(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "S.F. Newsletter (Jan.-June 1905)"

D EDO? 1SD17M 1 

California State Library 



MIA. 

!RARY. 



Accessions No,. 132960- ... Received .. 9Q61 . . $li... 

FEB 1906 



^'-•. , .*A-' V 



NEW YEAR'S EDITION 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, ISM 




<&uliffitnffi s %ob&vti*tv~ 

Devoted to the Leading' Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

price 10 cents. SarT Francisco, Saturday January 7, 1905 t* per year. 




The new Model N Packard combines all the proven excellence of our 
Model L, with the addition of more power, longer wheel base and double 
side entrance body. 

The car will take all reasonable hills on the high gear and yet easily maintain 45 miles per hour 
over ordinary country roads. 

Every available ounce of power developed by the 4-cylinder motor is nursed upon ball bearings 
and is transmitted upon the high speed through a bevel gear direct drive. 

The lubrication of the motor is positive, being accomplished by a gear driven single plunger 
pump. The carburetor automatically adjusts itself to every variation of motor speed and is not 
affected by atmospheric changes. 

The perfect control of the motor without removing the hands from the steering wheel, the 
noiselessness of the transmission, both in shifting and in operation, the smooth action of the clutch 
and the faultless ignition system are all exclusive PACKARD features. 

Wheel base 106 inches, rear springs 50 inches, all tires 34x4, tonneau extra roomy — will com-' 
fortably seat three large people. 

Price CM2S*) $3,500.00, f. o. b. Detroit 



PACKARD MOTOR CAR CO., DETROIT, MICH. MEMBEBS A - L 

California Dealer — Pacific Motor Car Co., 49 City Hail Ave., San Francisco. 



■ A. M. 




SWISS MARINE 

Insurance Companies Combined 
OF SWITZERLAND 

CAPITAL, - - - $4,000,000 



Louis Rosenthal, Gen. Agt. 

311 CALIFORNIA STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



PALACE HOTEL 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will now 
with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-five years carriages have 
been driven. This space of over a quarter of 
an acre has- recently, by the addition of very 
handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers and 
tropical plants, been converted into a lounging 
room, the FINEST IN THE WORLD. 

THE EMPIRE PARLOR; the PALM 
ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool Tables for the ladies; the LOUIS XV 
PARLOR; the LADIES' WRITING ROOM, 
and numerous other modern improvements, to- 
gether with unexcelled cuisine and the most 
convenient location in the city — all add much 
to the ever-increasing popularity of this most 
famous HOTEL. 



San Francisco 




I II llHlllllllIlllllllllillllllllltlllllUIllllltlllDlllllllllllilllll IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIitllllilllllllillllllMlllllllllllllllllll 



For Ease in Washing and Pleasure in Bathing, USE 20 MULE TEAM BORAX 




Purest 

and 

Best 

For Sale 
Everywhere 




DICKENS UP-TO-DATE. Benjamin Ide Oliver Twist Wheeler AsKs for More. 



1329G0 



Price per Copy, 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 

tin r**Nciteo 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 







Vol. LXX. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 7, 1905. 



Number 1. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER I* printed and published 
•very Saturday by the proprietor, Frederick Marriott, Halleck 
building-. 120 Sajuome street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Entered at San Francisco Postofflce as second class matter 

New York Office— (where Information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising)— 30fi Broadway. C. C. Murphy, 
KepresentaUve. 

London Office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C. England. George Street A Co. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than lam. 
Thursday previous to day of laaue. 

Oregon's land ring is in a fair way to be landed 
ln-hind the bars. 



The recent schuetzenfest at Folsom is one of the 
tilings California ought to be grateful for. 

There is no closed season for statesmen up in 
< ire-gon when the Federal Grand Jury goes gunning. 

A "hold-over" Senator is quite a different thing 
from a "hold-over" New Year celebration. 



Chairs are still being reserved for Russia and 
Japan in President Roosevelt's peace congress. 

Anomalous as it may sound, the average "hold-up" 
is without visible means of support. 

A "bookmaker" is a person who ought to be en- 
gaged in the manufacture of jute bags at San Quen- 
tin. 



The "shake-up" of the earthquake is like the 
"shake-down" of the police department in that no 
human agency can stop it. 

The Australians went wild over our Nance O'Neil 
and went wild at our group of O'Farrell street 
comedians. 



Three new buffalo have been added to the herd in 
the park. The same old "buffalo" is again in use at 
the State capital. 

Port Arthur has fallen at last, and, wonderful to re- 
late, without the assistance of any high-priced Ameri- 
can journalists. 

The price of rubber keeps on rising, but there ap- 
pears to be no falling off in the supply for the manu- 
facture of flexible necks for average citizens. 

About this season of the year the newspapers lay 
aside their squirt-guns long enough to say flattering 
things about their rival's voluminous holiday edi- 
tions. 



Now that San Francisco's delegation of lawmak- 
ers and lobbyists has departed for Sacramento, the 
police are settling down to the enjoyment of a sea- 
son of comparative quiet. 

Hearst suspects the Government of trying to steal 
California's Yosemite. The "young Napoleon of 
journalism" has been busy suspecting ever since his 
experience at St. Louis. 



San Francisco has plenty of fog at times, but 
thanks be to goodness, it is not the black brand which 
has lately been making "merrie England" the gloom- 
iest spot on earth. 

There is reason to be thankful that we are removed 
by the space of one week from the hideous horn- 
blowing incident to the the birth of a new year. 

The holidays are gone, and the bargain counter 
days have taken their place, because they bring profit 
to level down Christmas prices and thus even things 
by the law of averages. 



One good thing about the incoming of 1905 is that 
the city is one year nearer the finish of the City 
Hall patriots. May their likes never again be seen 
in the public's concerns. 

Chicago language-tinkers are trying to add several 
new letters to the alphabet. There seems to be 
enough already to keep most people busy with their 
spelling. 

San Francilsco had enough left over after Christ- 
mas and a long season of in-and-out horse-racing to 
make its New Year celebration not merely happy, 
but hilarious. 



Half a dozen postmasters in Idaho are polyga- 
mists, and so, under the discipline of the Mormon 
church, have something more substantial than 
stamps to lick. 

Brain anatomists in New York are looking up a 
form of bequest by which the lover of his race may 
legally will his thinking apparatus to them, and in- 
sure its delivery when he is done with it. 

An Eastern scientist likens the corpus callosum of 
the human brain to the telephone "central." Then 
aphasia is a case of crossed wires, and when you 
can't think of the word you want, it's "line busy." 

The tin angel on the City Hall dome begs to deny 
that the earthquakes have made her crooked, and to 
say that she is just as much on the level as she was 
before the Schmitz family became acquainted with 
her. 



Astronomers are preparing to view from Labra- 
dor another total eclipse of the sun. Up there, com- 
plete darkness will last two minutes. Down here it 
will not be long enough for the Schmitz administra- 
tion to get its hand into the public pocket. 

What matters it to you whether the measure be of 
gold or silver, of wood or of clay, if it be clean and 
honest ? But it does matter a great deal to you what 
the quality of the grain is that the measure measures 
to you. The measure I am speaking of is yourself, 
and the grains it measures to you are your thoughts, 
your desires, your aspirations. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 



THE DOLBEER WILL CASE. 

It is not often that such a spectacle is presented in 
a court of theatrical justice as that afforded the pub- 
lic in the Dolbeer will case, lately decided by a jury 
in favor of the proponent; it is not often that the 
smug, sleek little brothers and sisters of the rich 
have such an opportunity to earn their keep. Though 
the verdict went against the kinfolk of the dead wo- 
man, and her large estate was awarded in the first 
instance into alien hands, the relatives who contested 
a will that was full of duDiety were fortunate in hav- 
ing an attorney with courage and a conscience. Hi- 
ram Johnson's eloquent tongue was tied by no con- 
sideration for the feelings of the "society people" 
who, unquestionably, had banded together for the 
upsetting of the law, the perversion of the facts, and 
the gagging of justice. His forefinger did not wob- 
ble when he pointed it at the plain perjuries of the 
case, and his voice rang loud and clear when he de- 
nounced the hired witnesses of the proponents and 
their sophisticated statements made under oath. 

The Dolbeer case was simple enough : a rich young 
woman, the inheritor not only of a great fortune, but 
of a pronounced melancholia, accompanied by a well- 
defined tendency toward self-destruction, is commit- 
ted by environment and circumstance into the hands 
of a hired companion, a woman of about her own age, 
though not at all of her station in life. Left mother- 
less at an earl}' age by the suicide of one parent, she 
is thrown more and more upon the companionship 
of her paid attendant. Finally, upon her father's 
death, she comes into her estate, but she displays 
none, or few, of the characteristics of a sound men- 
tality in a wholesome body. More and more she is 
dominated by the hired companion, to the exclusion 
of healthy interests and associations. She becomes 
almost a recluse. The hired companion is her shadow 
— a shadow that shuts her off from her own relatives 
and from all the world. Finally, ill in mind and dis- 
tressed in body, she makes a will, leaving practically 
all her inheritance to the hired companion. Then, 
with a haste that excites comment, they go abroad, 
In Europe, the heiress' afflictions progress swiftly. 
Those of her acquaintances who come in contact with 
her note unmistakable signs of her deepening melan- 
choly ; some of them know and make written record 
of her steady drift toward suicidal dementia. On the 
way home she is killed by a mysterious fall from a 
high window in a New York hotel. The only witness 
is the hired companion, the chief beneficiary under 
that peculiar will. What is it — accident, suicide or 
what? In New York, the hired companion tells 
calmly enough her story of the heiress'tragic end; in 
San Francisco she is "utterly prostrated" for the pur- 
poses of publicity, but in private is able to direct her 
fight for a fortune and to go shopping. 

When the fight over the will comes on, the heiress 
of- an heiress is attended into court by a cloud of "so- 
ciety people" willing to swear to anything on her 
behalf — a vulgar, voluble flock of gaudily-plumed 
macaws, chattering from the chairs of the courtroom, 
doing their best to intimidate the simple, honest citi- 
zens who appear as contestants and testifving — 
again like the parrot tribe — with tales that dovetail 
only too well — and all this for one who, but for the 
remarkable will and the remarkable "accident," 
would be only a hired companion, and so beneath 
their notice. For her sake, or the sake of favors ex- 
pected from her, they make the shy, shrinking, ner- 
vous Bertha Dolbeer a bright, gay, high-spirited girl. 
With marvelous exactness, they cite incident after 
incident to prove how dashing she was, how fond of 



society, of sports, of the companionship of her fel- 
lows ; how untroubled was her life — a life that was 
shadowed, almost from its beginning, by knowledge 
of the curse Iieredity had laid upon her, and domi- 
nated, too, by the chilling and ever-present personal- 
ity that was done with her to the last hour! 

Attorney Hiram Johnson might have gone much 
further than he did in his flaming denunciation of the 
crew of toadies that outdid itself in hand-swearing for 
the proponent. He might have said much more 
about the character of their testimony, and their 
motives, without offending the public's sense of pro- 
priety. It is to be hoped that a higher court will at 
least afford him the opportunity to re-open the case 
and apply still further tests to the evidence that went 
so directly against all human nature. 



LOW, BRUTAL AND MURDEROUS CON- 
SPIRATORS. 

After suffering long, persistent and fiendish per- 
secution, the Union Lumber Company has brought 
suit in Judge Sloss' court against the Building Trades 
Council, with the Mill Owners' Association as co- 
defendant, that is well calculated to go down in his- 
tory as a test -of the sincerity of the nation's Declara- 
tion of Independence. In that document, the nation 
guarantees protection to the uttermost to all citizens 
who are lawfully pursuing a lawful occupation, and 
the several States, as well as the nation itself, are 
bound by the fundamental principles of their inde- 
pendence to secure this protection, even though tho 
military arm of the commonwealth has to be in- 
voked. 

This case has added importance because it identi- 
fies and makes co-defendants certain lawfully organ- 
ized and legally constituted industrial firms and com- 
panies in a suit for damages, and perpetual restraint 
against an organization of miserable wretches that 
has no legal existence ; that holds secret meetings ; 
that assumes tyrannical authority over employers 
and employees in the channels of industry, and sits 
in secret as a court of oyer and terminer to impose 
brutal penalties upon honest firms and corporations 
and individuals for refusing to obey its fiendish 
mandates. That is to say, these co-defendants muse 
answer for the crime of conspiring with an organiza- 
tion whose existence is itself a conspiracy against 
the peace and dignity of the law and the liberties 
of the people, to destroy, bankrupt and drive from the 
business world an industrial company whose credit, 
integrity and business methods are admitted to be 
above suspicion, and which has its existence by au- 
thority of a charter granted by the State, which in- 
strument also guarantees safe conduct and ample 
protection to the corporation it has created. 

These co-defendants should not be allowed to plead 
ignorance of the character of the Building Trades 
Council. They keep in touch with current events. 
They read the newspapers. Hence, they knew be- 
forehand, what the public has known to its sorrow 
for years, that the Building Trades Council is not 
only a standing conspiracy against and an everyday 
menace to the building industry of San Francisco, as 
everywhere else, but encourages, or orders, rather, 
strikes, boycotts, rioting, destruction of property, in- 
timidation of honest labor by threats and violence — 
even to the taking of life — when its right to dictate 
hours of labor, wages, from whom materials shall and 
shall not be procured, and otherwise tyrannize over 
employed capital and independent labor is ques- 
tioned. All this these co-defendants, the Mill ( )wn- 
ers' Association, knew, and it follows logically that 



January 7, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



thcv joined hands with the beastly Trades Council 

urc the aid of its lawless and murderous meth- 

the I 'nil >n Lumber Company— a busi- 

inization thai stands out conspicuously 

throughout the Pacific Coast for us sound financial 

standing, its high code of business ethics, and its f.iir- 

in the field of competition. But this miserable 

hand of leeches on the body industrial — the Trades 
Council — and their co-partners, the Mill < >wncr-' \» 
sociation, say that the Union Lumber Company's 

methods are "unfair." The synonyms nt' "unfair" ill 
the Trades Council's vulgar vocabulary are "thief," 
"dishonest," "immoral," "rascal." "liar," etc. And 
in all this infamous conspiracy against a most hon- 
orable business enterprise, can any one locate the 
exact spot in this vile combine at which the respect- 
able ( ?) Mill < hvners' Association leaves off and the 
slimy 'Trades Council begins? Is not the Associa- 
tion merely the continuation of the low and con- 
temptible Council, only towards greater depths of 
degradation — seeing that the Association is com- 
d of hitherto supposedly honest and law-abid- 
ing business firms? 

Hut it is up to Judge Sloss to say which shall domi- 
nate in this community, reputable business enter- 
prises and honest business methods, or conspira- 
cies, intrigues and other lawlessness; whether the 
laws and their machinery of operation are a sham and 
a mockery, or a reality with sufficient honest purpose 
behind them to enforce their intent, and whether or 
not the dictums of the Building Trades Council 
transcend the authority of the State. These things 
the public wants to know all about, and speedily, 
too. The Union Lumber Company of San Francisco 
and Fort Bragg have brought suit against the dast- 
ardly Trades Council and its co-partners of the Mill 
Owners' Association, for damages in the sum of 
$100,000, and for a perpetual injunction against boy- 
cotts and other conspiracies by this wicked and law- 
less combine. The sentiment of this community un- 
doubtedly is that the Union Lumber Company should 
not only be vindicated, but that the conspirators, the 
Trades Council-Mill Owners' Association, should be 
taught a lesson, the moral and legal effects of which 
would operate to eliminate all such disgraceful and 
brutal and villainous practices from San Francisco's 
channels of trade, industry and commerce. 



WORK FOR THE MERCHANTS' ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

From now until next November, when San Fran- 
cisco will elect a successor to Schmitz, seems a long 
time, but it is none too long if the decent people of 
the city are in earnest about wanting somebody else 
and somebody better than the fiddler in the Mayor's 
chair. The primary will come in August, and it is 
there and then that the battle must be fought. Here 
the cards will be stacked and the dice loaded against 
anything that smells of reform. The Ruef-Schmitz 
gang, controlling the Election Commission, will con- 
trol all the machinery of the primary. It will desig- 
nate the voting places, select the officers and judges 
of election, and conduct the counting. The bogus 
Democratic organization which was badly burned, 
but not scotched last August by the respectable wing 
of that party, will be in the field again, hunting any 
kind of a corrupt alliance ; the Republican organiza- 
tion is entirely in the hands of the gang; whatever 
strength remains in the Union Labor Party will be 
of course at the call of the administration. 

Nothing, then, is left but the radical course of in- 
jecting into the situation an independent ticket, so 



carefully selected that not one man elected on it can 
be pulled down, before or after the primary. I 
in the preliminary skirmishing, it must be known 
with reasonable delinitcncss what kind of nun the 
independents have in mind for municipal offi 
It would not be bad politics to announce the pro* 
pective head of the independent ticket at the \ ery 
outset, choosing such a man that his name will in- 
vite support. Then detailed preparations mus 
made to do business against an Election Hoard 
which has already shown that it will not stop at fel- 
ony in the obeying of orders from kuef and Schmitz. 
The new movement must be in readiness to deal with 
a Registrar who cares nothing about the law or pub- 
lic opinion as long as he pleases his masters. It 
must be armed so that it can stand off organized and 
experienced bands of ballot-box stuffers, aided by 
election officers who do not mind going to jail. Wy- 
man, Rebstock and Steffins may not be in a position 
to do business by that time, but Maestretti is still on 
deck, and these are only three of his many bond- 
men. 

Naturally, the public looks to the Merchants' As- 
sociation to initiate the work of reform. It is fully 
advised of the needs of the hour, and it knows by 
experience how to go about the task which cannot 
be left to other hands. Granted only that its first 
step be taken early and in the right direction, there 
will be no lack of feet to follow in them. 



U. S. SENATOR GEORGE A. KNIGHT. 

Among the many acceptable candidates that crowd 
into the minds of the feathered Solons at Sacramento 
as available timber for the Senatorship, there is none 
that comes so pertinently forward as George A. 
Knight. He is the logical candidate of those Legis- 
lators who, desiring to smooth over the difficulties 
existing in other factions, having no desire to show 
favoritism north or south, will select a man hailing 
from the city of San Francisco. 

Knight is a man who grows on acquaintance, and 
he has won the admiration of old friends and added 
the friendship of new adherents since going to Sac- 
ramento. Since it has been decided that this Sena- 
torial contest is to be a free and untrammeled con- 
test, Knight's chances have decidedly improved. 

The News Letter made mention of George A. 
Knight's candidacy last week, and what we said then 
regarding his fitness for the office applies with added 
force to-day. His general business ability, his spec- 
ial knowledge of the law, his wide acquaintanceship 
with his constituency, and his known sympathy with 
all the desires of the national administration are the 
particular and specific reasons why he should be 
chosen. As we prophesied last week, the question 
of locality has been entirely eliminated, and it is now 
a question of fitness only. 

THE RHODES' SCHOLARSHIPS. 

In spite of all the head-shaking of the pessimists, 
the Rhodes scholarships to Oxford seem to be very 
popular with the university students in this State. 
We have certainly no reason to be ashamed of the re- 
sults of our efforts. Our boys did second best in 
the country, and the career of young Crittenden at 
Oxford appears likely to match his success in this 
community. - Cecil Rhodes was a very astute man, 
and in the creation of these university opportunities 
for American boys, he laid the foundation of a better 
international understanding. There is little doubt 
that the ancient foundation whose guests they are 
will profit from the contact with young America. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 



THE FALL OF PORT ARTHUR. 

The surrender of Port Arthur to the besieging 
army does not come as a surprise. It was inevitable 
at the outset, and the surprise is that General Stoes- 
scl was able to hold the Japanese in check so long. 
Both the besieged and besieging armies will go down 
in history for valor and heroic deeds, which in none 
of the wars of the world will scarcely be found a 
parallel. The Japanese have abundant reason to be 
proud of their victory to the point of boasting, but 
none the less have the Russians reason to be proud 
of their defense to the point of egotism. The loss 
in killed and wounded within and without the forts 
is to be counted by the tens of thousands, to say 
nothing of the enormous cost in money in destroyed 
warships and in guns and ammunition. Yet from the 
viewpoint of what was to be accomplished, the van- 
quished did not pay too much, nor did the victors. 
But the capture of the stronghold was of vital im- 
portance to the Japanese, but not so vital was its re- 
tention to the Russians after their warships had been 
rendered unfit for service and General Kuropatkin 
had been driven back upon Mukden, and the seas of 
East Asia without an armed vessel carrying the 
Czar's flag. The reduction of the forts was a strategi- 
cal, political and moral necessity to Japan. Its de- 
fense as long as possible was necessary for the moral 
influence that stubborn resistance would exert upon 
Kuropatkin's army and the people of Russia. 

But now that all Russia knows what has befallen 
Stoessel and his heroic band — now .that the public 
knows that it has been fed upon rank deception and 
cunning falsehood all these months concerning the 
situation in the Far East — what will be the political 
consequences in the Empire? That question trans- 
cends all others that concern the nations. Doubtless, 
there will be loud and vehement denunciation of the 
official Government, and there may be rioting, but it 
is doubtful if public sentiment would sanction, much 
less encourage, an uprising of the dignity and rami- 
fications of a revolution. The ignorance of the Rus- 
sian people is too great to be relied upon for anything 
like an intelligent uprising. It is said that fully one- 
third of Kuropatkin's army cannot read or write. If 
these ignorant masses were imbued with the real 
spirit of personal liberty they might be dangerous, 
but they are not, and since those who would lead 
them into a rebellion are socialistic agitators with- 
out honesty or capacity, there does not appear to be 
any danger of a long-lived revolution, if one at all. 
Then, again, those who are demanding reforms in 
the Government for the good of all the people are 
the "Intellectuals," which includes the nobility and 
the better element of the middle class, but they are 
as much opposed to an armed revolution as the Czar 
himself. Hence an effort to incite the people to an 
effort to overthrow the Government by a general re- 
bellion is not likely to be made. 

"But will the fall of Port Arthur end the war?" is 
asked on every hand. There is no reason why it 
should. The Japanese have acquired only a small 
fraction of Manchuria. General Kuropatkin is at 
Mukden, with a large army, which will be swelled 
to over 600,000 by early spring. He controls about 
1,400 miles of the Siberian railway in Manchuria, 
with uninterrupted train service to the supply centers 
in European Russia and Siberia. In fact, Russia is 
in better shape in the Far East to engage the land 
forces of Japan than at any previous time since the 
war began ; besides, the Czar could swell the ranks of 
the Manchurian army of 1,000,000 men without ma- 
terially weakening the home establishment, and 
whatever the sentiment of Russians as a whole may 



be as to reforms in the Government, they are practi- 
cally a unit on the question of prolonging the war 
until the wrong of Japanese invasion is avenged and 
the army regains its lost prestige. All this the Mi- 
kado foresaw when he announced that Japan ex- 
pected the war to last three and perhaps five years. 
No, the fall of Port Arthur intensifies rather than 
weakens the war spirit in Russia. But what the 
powers may do in the premises is another question. 

CAUSE AND EFFECT IN PRISON DISCIPLINE 

We have had two contrasting events in prison life 
lately which throws a whole flood of light upon the 
mismanagement of our places of penal discipline. At 
Folsom an attempted escape on the part of the con- 
victs was only frustrated by a deadly fusillade and 
the killing of three men. At San Quentin, the War- 
den of the prison choose to exercise his somewhat 
peculiar taste in the entertainment at dinner of a 
number of the convicts. The two events are inti- 
mately related, and point to one fact, which is the 
cause of all our trouble. That fact is the lamentable 
lack of discipline in prison life. The attempt at Fol- 
som was the second of the sort, the first having had 
an encouraging measure of success. That such at- 
temps should be made at all reflects no credit on the 
prison management. It is an absurdity that convicts 
should have the opportunity of consorting and ac- 
complishing a movement which implies in the very 
nature of it a certain amount of liberty absolutely 
inconsistent with prison life. Surely some super- 
vision can be exercised which will prevent such 
things occurring. 

With regard to the i>an Quentin affair, it ought to 
be obvious that no man is fit for the position of war- 
den who finds his pleasure in the society of convicts. 
A commissioned officer who indulged his whim for 
the society of privates at the table would soon be 
shelved. How much more absurd is it that a 
State officer should be allowed to gratify his personal 
preferences for the society of the depraved. 



The question of whether or not it is good form for 
a freshman to shoot a sophomore when the hazing 
is on, is now up to university presidents. Look for 
a hung jury. 

FAT FOLKS 

I reduced my weight seventy pounds, bust six Inches, waist 
six Inches, and hips fourteen Inches In a short time by a guar- 
anteed harmless remedy, without exercise or starving. I will 
tell you all about It. Enclose stamp. Address MRS. E. R. RICH- 
ARDS. 225 EAST NINTH ST., RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA. 




UCHAS. KLILLS & COU 

&£XCL C/S/VE& 
HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

Half a century of "Knowing how to make good 
clothes" is the pedigree of makers who make ours. 
This goodness and worth is in every model shown 
here. Our tailoring service is thorough. You can 
depend upon being fitted here correctly. 



KEAIJy^STIRJiLIS'ir 



January 7. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 





own 




He if the Police 

•k the bribes From the Chinks ; 
He ans« 1 red with gurg 

With sighs ana with winks. 
lUit never a syllable tripped from his tongue — 

He was mute as a mouse — 
"Me i!" sabe," says Cheung. 

And 'tis always the way. 

When the wicked conspire, — 
When the people talk loudly 

And bristle with ire — 
When every one clamors 

That some one be hung, 
The scoundrels who know, 

Never "sabe.'' like Cheung. 

The case of Mrs. Emma Clarke, who was discov- 
ered to be managing an unlicensed maternity hospi- 
tal, and who offered one of the babies for sale for 
nty-five dollars, is a nice commentary on the 
strictures which we pass on Chinese slavery. It is 
very probable that this business has a wider scope 
than we imagined, and that a sort of chattel slavery 
still persists in our midst. 

I sympathize with Dr. Ragan in his reply to an at- 
tack upon "Health Hints for Households." In the 
fullness of my ignorance, I was myself somewhat 
skeptical with regard to its value, but am now con- 
vinced that it was one of the most original, and per- 
haps valuable, experiments made in the direction of 
municipal hygiene. The Crier is never above admit- 
ting a mistake. 

Weeping Tom Cator effected the acquittal of the 
Election Board on purely technical grounds. It is 
a little significant that proceedings against corrupt 
officials should almost always be legally defective. 
It is an open question whether the prosecuting at- 
torneys are lacking in ability or in integrity. 

A wise local editor, apropos of the Teachers' State 
Convention, remarks that matrimony is no longer a 
climax in woman's career, thus implying that the 
teachers are fonder of teaching than of matrimony. 
If he has the courage of his convictions, let him pro- 
pose to one of them. 

Britt wants to fight White, an Englishman, and he 
prefers to fight in San Francisco, because the gate 
receipts will be heavier than elsewhere. This is a 
pretty commentary on our standing as one of the 
world's leading cities. 

The Fruit Dealers are going to strengthen their or- 
ganization. No organization of Fruit Dealers will, 
however, bring it about that the best fruit is not 
always at the top of the basket. The Omnipotent 
gave fruitmen and milk-dealers consciences which 
do not respond to ordinary stimuli. 

The demands for appropriations which are being 
made continually upon the State by the University 
are growing intollerable. Talk about a white ele- 
phant. A whole circus full of white elephants would 
be less expensive than the abode of sweetness and 
light which we have to keep up at Berkeley. 

The Castlehun case has shown that there is at least 
one path in the Park on which we can walk, without 
the danger of arrest. The police force is so delight- 
fully uncertain in its working that it is really an 
advantage to be sure of this much. 



The Chinese have a new scheme for defrauding the 
Immigration Commissioners. They marry a wife in 
China — at least, such of them as .ire Americans, They 
get the wife admitted here as tin- wife of an \. 

can. anil then make a slave "f her. After all. this 
custom is not so very unusual with ourselves. What 
an elevating effect our civilization evidently lias upon 
tin- Chinese. 

Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings! Little 
Pomona has managed to enforce an ordinance mak- 
ing it a misdemeanor for anyone to charge a higher 
rate for gas than that imposed by the city ordinance. 
If we can only find some one here with pluck enough 
to make the stand, we ought to have some fun. 

It is really time that some stop were put to the 
fudging of documents, such as has appeared in the 
Monnier case. If the courts would only do their duty 
and promptly get rid of some of the attorneys who 
try the trick on, there would be a much more satisfac- 
tory condition of things. As it is, one can depend 
on nothing. 

Four lately-arrived shepherds from the Basque 
country were nearly asphyxiated with our local gas. 
Here is another example of the effects of civilization 
upon native races. Civilization, by the way, appears 
to imply an ability to endure corruption, material and 
political. 

There is a great outcry against the proposed fixing 
a uniform rate of teachers' salaries by the State. But 
some such measure would seem to afford the only 
solution of the difficulty which is experienced in 
finding suitable teachers in the country districts. 

There never was such a place as Oakland. It is 
always having its scavengers haled into court for 
cleaning up the place against the wishes of the in- 
cinerating company, and it lets thugs and highway- 
men clean up its citizens without a protest. 

Let us be joyful ! Life wears its old aspect again. 
After a discreet wait, the Berkeley thugs have again 
begun operations with some de/jree of success, and 
managed to stun a woman and steal her purse and 
handbag. There is nothing like a college town for 
sport. 

Mayor Olney was a little doubtful as to how the 
ordinance requiring the removal of signs from the 
sidewalks would be regarded by the Oakland busi- 
ness men. There is nothing new in this. Mayor 
Olney has been a little doubtful all through his term 
of office. 

The Reverend H. L. Boardman complains to the 
Baptist Ministers' Association that the mad rush for 
money has caused a decline in spirituality. The 
reverend gentleman should feel ashamed, for it is a 
poor sentry that lets the enemy rush the outworks. 

The codlin moth has arrived to eat up the parasites. 
There is much excitement at the City Hall, where a 
special meeting of the Board of Health is to be caller! 
for the purpose of finding a bacillus to fight the cod- 
lin enemy. 

Bank clerks are regarded by United States Immi- 
gration officials as laborers. It would be hard to say 
why, unless it is because they do not labor. 

We should like to remind Dr. Simon, who has just 
been appointed a member of the Board of Health, 
that evil communications corrupt good manners. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
Society Notes 



Many well-known San Francisco people have 
stopped at the Burlington, No. 10 West 30th street, 
d iring the past few months, among whom were Dr. 
W. S. Thorn, Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Hancock and Mr. 
'•rank Coffin, who had just returned from a tour of 
Europe. Mrs. J. S. Birmingham is wintering there, 
while Aliss Mary Genevieve Moroney has for some 
months made it her home. The house has been con- 
ducted as a family and transient hotel for the past 
eighteen months by Messrs. Fortescue and Grant, 
who were the proprietors, and opened the Cumber- 
land on Bush street. 

* * * 

Arrivals at Hotel Del Monte for the week ending 
January 2, 1905 : Mrs. Sydney Smith and the Misses 
Smith, Mrs. Phillip Van Home Lansdale, Mrs. F. E. 
Mead, C. A. Miller, Mr. and Mrs. W. Mayo New- 
hall, Miss Newhall, Miss E. Newhall, Mayo New- 
hall, Dr. and Mrs. Abram, Mr. and Mrs'. Max Schwa- 
bacher, F. W. Runyon, Mrs. L. H. Bryan, Mrs. ]. 
L. Bradbury, Miss Bryan, R. Mason Smith, Miss 
Middleton, Dr. L. A. Draper, J.. Hubert Mee, Spen- 
cer Grant, A. W. Foster, Jr., Jas. D. Phelan, Enrique 
Grau, Mrs. Reginald Brooke, Mrs. J. Downey Har- 
vey, Mr. and Mrs. Ashton Potter, Mrs. I. L. Requa, 
Mrs. Oscar F. Long, Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Tubbs, Mr. 
and Mrs. I. Fleischmann, Sam Heller, Miss Phelan, 
Mrs. Belvin, San Francisco. Mrs. A. W. Foster, Miss 
Anna Foster, San Rafael; Miss Scott, St. Louis; Mr. 
and Mrs. J. W. Harnman, Mr. and Mrs. Edna 1. 
Dodge, New York. 

* * * 

Arrivals at Hotel Rafael during week ending 
Tuesday, January 3, 1905: J. C. Campern, Miss 
Houghton, C. L. Colburn, Mr. and Mrs. Henrv 
Levy, F. B. Anderson, B. T. Anderson, Mr. Tames 
Robinson, Miss Robinson, Miss Cooper, A. P." Rob- 
inson, E. K. Hurlbert, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Austin, 
C. G. Gunther, A. A. Sirl, Mr. and Mrs. E. Hansen, 
W. G. Bullis, Willis E. Peck. There were several 
dinner parties at the hotel during the holidays, and 
many society people from San Francisco were guests 
at the hotel. 



ENTERTAINMENTS. 

January 1 (Sunday)— Miss Leontine Blakeman was 
"at home." Mrs. Ynez Shorb White entertained 
her friends. Miss Dorothy Eels gave a house 
party in Ross Valley| Mr. and Mrs. William 
Bourne gave a house party. The Misses Eliza- 
beth and Ruth Allen entertained at their San 
Mateo home. Mrs. William Henry Smith gave 
a tea on Monaay. Lieutenant Rockwell gave a 
breakfast. Mrs. John Lawson entertained a 
house party. 

January 3 (Tuesday)— Mrs. Redmond Payne gave a 
luncheon in honor of her sister, Miss' Irene Sa- 
bin. Mrs. J. R. Nuttall gave a dinner. 

January 5 (Thursday; — Mr. Edward M. Greenway 
will give a ball in honor of the Gaiety Club. Mrs. 
Blair will give a bridge party. Mrs. Teanette 
Hooper gave a luncheon. 

January 6 (Friday)— Mrs. Eleanor Martin was "at 
home." Mrs. Freeman and Miss Maud Payne 
were "at home." Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Payne 
gave a dance. 

Januarv 7 (Saturday) — Mrs. Austin Coolidge gives 
a tea in honor of Miss Elsa Draper. Miss Chris- 
tine Pomeroy will give a dinner. The Bohemian 
Club gives its annual Christmas dinner. 



January 7, igc.5. 

January 10 (Tuesday)— Mrs. Charles Deering will 

give a luncheon. 
January 12 (Thursday)— Miss Beatrice Fife will give 

a luncheon in honor of Miss Irene Sabin. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
December 31 (Saturday) — Miss Marie Voorhies, 

daughter of Dr. and Mrs. A. H. Voorhies, to 

Captain H. P. Young, at the family home, 21 11 

California street. 
January 11 (Wednesday)— Miss Gertrude Dutton 

to Josiah Howell at Trinity Church. 
ENGAGEMENTS. 
Miss Susie Le Count to the Reverend David Evans, 

rector of Grace Episcopal Church. 
Miss Mary Dame Kittredge to Dr. charles Adams 

Peters. 
Miss Cornelia Dean Gon.on, daughter of General and 

Mrs. David S. Gordon, of Washington, D. C, 

to Isaac O. Upham, of San Francisco. 



San Francisco is a citv of beautiful women, really 
too trite a saying to publish, had we nothing to say 
with it. Our civic pride prompt-, us to let out a little 
secret for the benefit of those who are or are not 
already fair. The writer happened into the cozy 
offices of M. Ella Harris, the famous chemist and 
skin specialist, at 128 Gear) street, the other day. and 
learned something of the science of producing beauty 
there practiced. One can see positive and undis- 
puted evidence of some of the most marvelous trans- 
formations being effected — women of sixty made to 
look like twenty-five. Even the medical profession 
is baffled, yet unstinted in their praise and apprecia- 
tion of the scientific aid to nature as accomplished by 
M. Ella Harris. The eminent practitioner, Dr. Eliza- 
beth J. Corbett, says: "I regard this discovery of M. 
Ella Harris only equaled by the discovery of an- 
aesthetics as a boon to humanity. 1 also want to 
say explicitly that this treatment is affected without 
surgical interference. There is no blood-letting, no 
cutting, and no electricity employed. This fact elimi- 
nates all fear of unfortunate results. I hesitate no 
longer to give my unqualified indorsement to this 
method." 




HELLER & FRANK 
C L 6 Yh'i E R S 

$15.00 

They were late in transit- 
about seventy- five single 
and double-breasted Sack 
Suits all sizes were to sell for 
$22.60 and $25, now marked 
fifteen dollars, to make room 
for spring models, about to 
arrive. 

MARKET STREET 
AND GRANT AVENUE 




January 7. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Lillian Lawrence, a favorite of the Alcazar Com- 
pany. 



Mme. Melba, who will appear at the Alhambra 
early in February. 




Kathryn rvictcier, who appears as co-star with 
Frederick Warde at the Columbia Theatre. 




John Craig, in "Old Heidelberg"— Alcazar Theatre. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 




Maxine Elliott 



Madge Drew Mary Mannering Minnie Ashley 

Photos by Morrison— Kockwood— Morrison— Falk 



BEAUTY AND 

THE 
FOOTLIGHTS 



LEIGH GORDAN GILTNER 
in Overland Monthly 



If, as William Shakespeare hath it, "beauty is 
bought by judgment of the eye," then the aggregate 
of feminine loveliness before the footlights varies 
always in direct ratio with the number and variety 
of optics theatrically inclined. 

Fortunately, tastes, individual, collective, general 
and local, differ in respect to personal pulchritude. 
The face which appeals to the eye of the artist, often- 
times fails to touch the crasser sensibilities of the 
multitude, while the type which delights the aesthetic 
sense of a given nationality, is, not infrequently, in 
direct antithesis to the standards of another. The 
actress who pleases the provinces may be voted a 
guy by metropolitan playgoers, and — mark ye this, 
my masters ! — vice versa. Incredible as it may seem, 
the judgment of a metropolitan press and public has 
been known to be reversed — a reversal subsequently 
sustained by the self-same judges who rendered the 
original verdict. In the days not so long gone, when 
as Miss Marlowe herself phrased it, New York 
"would not have her," the provinces (and to the New 
Yorker all is provincial that is not of New York — 
Greek and Boeotian still!) had for years recognized 
her histrionic gift and her peculiar magnetic charm. 
To-day, Miss Marlowe plays to phenomenal business 
in the city which once closed its gates to her, and the 
critics who once condemned her, either outright or 
with the faintest of faint praise, are now practically 
unanimous in their acclaim. On the other hand, 
though this is more rarely the case, New York and 
London successes have occasionally failed of en- 
dorsement in the provinces. 

"Beauty is bought by judgment of the eye, not 
uttered by base sale of chapman's tongues." Evi- 
dently the methods of the press-agent (to whom pro- 
phetic reference might almost seem to have been 
made) were embryonic in Shakespeare's time. Noth- 
ing could be truer than that the world accepts the in- 
dividual at his or her own estimate. Let but a wo- 
man, whether of society or the stage, persistently 
assume the attitude of a beauty ; let her cause herself 
to be loudly heralded as such ; let her be duly photo- 
graphed and "written up" and advertised (and the 
methods used nowadays in advertising feminine 
charms differ little from those employed in booming 
a cereal food, cosmetic or a dentifrice), and in the end 
the world will, outwardly, at least, recognize her 
claim. Men, after all are much like sheep — one fol- 
lows where another leads. Let but one courtier hail 
a woman queen, and a dozen subjects will spring up 
to do her homage, even though in their secret souls 
they know their sovereign a lay figure, wearing a 
pasteboard crown and clothed upon with the shim- 
mering robes of illusion. The favor of a personage 
of high degree or the dictum of a noted critic has 
more than once availed to establish as a reigning 



stage beauty an actress whose much-heralded charms 
would suffer by contrast with those of some humble 
\ illage belle. The beauty which satisfies the heart is 
bought only by judgment of the individual eye. Each 
must discover it for himself. 

Beauty, in the last analysis, is largely a matter "l 
taste, particularly in our cosmopolitan country, where 
there is no distinctively national type, and where 
often coloring, expression and mobility of feature 
outrank classic contours and precision of outline. The 
Greeks and Romans had certain fixed standards of 
masculine and feminine perfection, which were ap- 
plied alike in their judgments of individual charm 
and to their conceptions in art; while that which we 
of to-day term beauty is often something less — or 
more — than flawlessness of feature, a something sub- 
tle, impalpable, indefinable, yet none the less potent. 
There are, however, certain women whose beaut) is 
so patent, so transcendent so compelling that all men 
(and even all women) must admit its existence. Mary 
Anderson was one of these. 

The same standards can scarcely be applied to the 
beauty of society and the beauty of the stage. As the 
tone adapted to the drawing-room would scarcely 
carry across the foot-lights, so must the conventional 
manner, gesture and costume of society be accentu- 
ated, even exaggerated, in order to be effective on the 
stage, just as the scene painter must paint with a 
broader brush and more vivid colors than the artist 
whose canvasses are destined for closer and more 
critical scrutiny. The reflections in the mirror which 
the players hold up to nature are of heroic propor- 
tions. The stage demands strong contrasts, bold 
outlines, broad effects. Many a recruit from the 
drawing-room seeking to exploit her charms upon 
the stage, finds her gestures and movements tame 
and ineffectual, while her beauty, which she has not 
learned the art of making the most of, pales before 
the radiance of some stage favorite, who may be far 
plainer in real life, like feeble beams of a candle in 
the luminous glow of the incandescent. Coloring 
and complexion go for little before the footlights 
— these are matters for the make-up box. 

It is chiefly contour and feature that catch the 
managerial eye, which in time acquires the faculty 
of selecting from a bevy of pretty faces those which 
will make up well, and those which to fresco with 
kohl and carmine were in truth to "paint the lily." 
No one could claim for Mine. Modjeska surpassing 
beauty off the stage, yet equally could no one deny 
that in character, whether as Rosalind of Beatrice or 
Ophelia, she fills the eye and delights the artistic 
sense. Given good outlines and features well-de- 
fined, even if something rugged — coiffeur, costumer 
and make-up artist will do the rest. Though the 
modern tendency toward realism in stage effects has 



January 7, 1905. 

in amount 
lial, and the 

.•car without a touch ol 
lening effect of th< 
lights, simply detracts from the ensemble to a certain 
■it. It has been claimed that Mary Anderson 
never made up except ior pronounced character 
This is an error, though it is true she dis- 
played a moderation in the use of grease-paint which 
ur vaudeville performers would do well to 
emulate. 

Beauty, without doubt, is an incalculable aid to an 
actress, in that it enlists tor her the managerial inter- 
im! the patience and consideration .if her au- 
diences during the days of her apprenticeship, as 
well -is enables her to adequately embody the concep- 
tions of the playwright and realize the ideals of the 
playgoer. The woman without any particular charm 
of face or figure who adopts the stage as a profession, 
will find herself heavily handicapped from the begin- 
ning to the end of her career. Vet that beauty is 
not absolutely essential to success upon the stage a 
glance at the foremost feminine exponents of the 
drama will prove. The great Rachel was not a 
beauty, strictly speaking; the face of Fanny Kemble 
marred by the ravages of smallpox. Charlotte 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 

light a sculptor. ,iv in, bed it has done; Maxinc 
Elliott and Julia Arthur are regally beautiful women: 
Viola Allen has not only beaut] of feature, but a 
rarer beauty of expression; the charm of Julia Mar- 
lowe's face is not without relation to a piquant 

file and a dimpled chin: ( idette Tyler is even prettier 
in private life than in the glare- of the footlights; 
Mary Mannering is admittedly a beauty, and the 

loveliness of Lillian Russell, despite the encroach- 
ments of advanced years and adipose tissue, remains 
perennially seraphic. 

Ii were invidious to attempt to determine to which 

of the many lovely women ol our modern stage the 
golden apple should be awarded, and rash imbed 
would be the critic who should essay the role of 
Paris — the bold youth who was, beyond a doubt, 
chief of the heroes of antiquity. The doughty deeds 
of Achilles and Agamemnon fade .into insignificance 
beside the courage of the son of Priam, who dared 
make choice between the charms of three divinities, 
each dowered with an inconvenient omnipotence. 
Surely, though the gallantry of Paris was sadly at 
fault, his intrepidity deserved a better recompense 
than the gift of a second-hand charmer whose posses- 
sion but served to plunge him into unpleasant com- 
plications. Even to-day, frankness — especially in re- 
spect to feminine charms — remains one of the virtues 




Gladys Wallis 



Emma Eames Julia Marlowe 

Photos by Falk — Aime Dupont — Morrison 



Cushman was of rather a masculine type; Duse's 
countenance is intellectual rather than beautiful; 
Ellen Terry runs the gamut from positive plainness 
to potential beauty; Bernhardt exhibits, in lieu of 
perfection of feature, a sinuous grace, a perfect poise 
of body and a knowledge of composition and group- 
ing so accurate that she is always a harmonious, 
though striking, element in a stage picture ; Minnie 
Maddern Fiske's beauty is more that of the spirit 
than the flesh ; Maud Adams is pleasing rather than 
pretty, and Clara Morris frankly characterized one 
of her literary creations, easily identified with her- 
self, as "having escaped being a beauty so easily that 
one could not help feeling that she had never been in 
danger. 

On the other hand, Sarah Siddons was a woman of 
surpassing beauty and commanding presence ; Peg 
Woffington was reckoned lovely in her day ; Mary 
Anderson's classic countenance, judged even by the 
rigid standards of the ancients, was faultless, except 
for a very slight defect in the contour of the cheek ; 
Fanny Davenport in her prime was a splendid speci- 
men of physical perfection ; Emma Eames has a face 



which is its own (sole) reward, as any man who has 
essayed it can testify. 

Personal beauty is recognized the world over as a 
power, but nowhere is it more potent than on the 
stage. The actress, realizing this, sets about making 
the most and best of her charms and concealing or 
modifying her defects. To this end she invokes all 
the known laws of beauty and hygiene, as well as 
the adventitious aid of coiffeur, manicurer, derma- 
tologist, masseur and modiste — all of whom are ar- 
tists in their line. The result is that in spite of hard 
work, long rehearsals, late hours and constant travel, 
the actress of forty is apparently in her prime, while 
the farmwife or village matron of the same age looks 
twenty years her senior. It is not work, if that work 
be congenial, which ages women, but the dull routine, 
the helpless drudgery, the monotonous dead level 
of a life unbroken by change or incident. The ac- 
tress' life, hard though it is, is one of infinite variety, 
and women of the stage, as a rule, retain their youth 
and beauty far longer than their sisters who have pre- 
ferred the glow of the domestic hearth to the glare 
of the footlights. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 




Francis J. Heney, the I iovernment's special prose-j» 
cutor in the timber land fraud cases, certainly hadjj 
tr.e time of his life in Portland. He brought about™ 
the indictment of Senator Mitchell and Congressman 
Hermann, caused the removal from office of United 
States District Attorney Hall, and is now acting as 
District Attorney himself. Heney is a li l tie fellow, 
but he is full of fight, and President Roosevelt evi- 
dently fully appreciates tne attorney's qualities. The 
Nemesis ot the timber land manipulators is a resident 
of this city, wdiere 1 e has resided for some ten years 
past, just previous to which he was Attorney-Gen- 
eral of Arizona. Heney is ;i Democrat, and bad some 
passing prominence in local politics about seven 
years ago, when lie acted with Major Harney and 
others in fighting McNao. Since that time, he has 
given his entire attention to his profession. Judg- 
ing from the prompt action taken on his recommen- 
dations in the matter of District Attorney Hall, 
Heney stands high at Washington. 

The well-developed commercial sense of David Be- 
lasco has prevented the presentation by Blanche 
Bates of a Shakespearean drama for the benefit of a 
local charity. For a long time past, Miss Bates has 
cherished a desire to appear in the "legitimate." 
Some of her many friends in this city knew of her 
ambition, and knowing also her charitable disposi- 
tion, suggested that she give a matinee performance 
for the benefit of some worthy institution. Dick 
Hotaling was deep in the plot, ami lie had agreed to 
appear with Miss Bates. "The Merchant of Ven- 
ice" was selected for the performance, Miss Bates to 
appear as Portia and Hotaling as Shylock. Hotaling 
is well known as an actor of considerable ability. He 
has bestrode the boards many times in the cause of 
charity, and has always presented an excellent per- 
formance. Many years ago he appeared as Riche- 
lieu at the Grand Opera House, since which time he 
has always been considered by society as a heavy 
tragedian awaiting only the opportunity to win real 
fame. The eagerness of Miss Bates to play Shakes- 
peare, and her willingness to give a charity matinee, 
presented the much-desired opportunity. The per- 
formance was to have been given during Miss Bates's 
present engagement, but Belasco vetoed the propo- 
sition. He plans to bring out Miss Bates in Shakes- 
peare this year, and negotiations are now on to se- 
cure David Warfield for her support. Since Warfield 
gave over comedy, and seriously engaged in the le- 
gitimate drama, he lias won great success. Belasco 
did not want the edge taken off his enterprise by con- 
senting to his star's appearance, even at a charity 
show, before he was ready to present her to the 
public as the latest exponent of the legitimate, so we 
must possess our souls in patience until Miss Bates 
comes hitherward again with Shakespeare's women 
in her train. 

* * * 

The Native Daughters of the Golden West will 
cause the introduction in the Legislature of a bill 
providing an appropriation for a statue to be erected 
in the national galler" ot statuary at Washington in 
honor of some distinguish ed statesman of California. 
The Native Daughters feel that we have been too 
modest. Other States, they say, have erected in 
the national Panthenon expensive figures of marble 
and of bronze, made in the image and the likeness of 
one or more of their distinguished men, and there 



lis no reason why California should not make proper 
'addition to the brilliant galaxy. Whom shall we 
fname for the honor? Remember, it is considered 
rather bad taste to erect a monument to a man who 
is yet in the flesh. Our stone must be raised to com- 
memorate the greatness of a "dead one." When one 
pauses to consider the matter, there should be little 
difficulty in obtaining, during the present session of 
the Legislature, a long list of "dead ones," almost 
any one of whom possessed in his time qualities 
that entitle him to remembrance. Now, there is 
Charley Shortridge, for instance. None, more than 
he. possessed to the full all the qualities that make 
for greatness. Knowing himself well, he was ever 
aware of the benefit he conferred upon California by 
permitting it to be known that be consented to re- 
side within her borders. And then, oh, ye lovers 
of the beautiful in nature, think how marked would 
be the statue which bore the imprint of Shortridge's 
classic features! Or, how would Colonel Dan Burns 
do? or U. S. Grant, Jr.? Or any three of the present 
candidates for Senator? ( >r Martin Kelly? And 
there are others who, in common with those that are 
named, possess the primeval quaification for enroll- 
ment among the great — they are all "dead ones." 

* * * 

The Examiner advertises that people who read its 
Sunday issue will be hereafter entitled to accident in- 
surance policies. They need them. An all-wise 
Providence keeps a close watch upon us, and soon 
or late, Fate will certainly make a visitation upon 
any one who persists in reading the yellow journal's 

Sunday issue. 

* * * 

The Comptroller announces that there are 10,- 
000,000 in the State Treasury. The Legislature has 

just opened its session. What's the answer? 

* * M 

.That pinnacle on the Larkiu street tower of the 
Cilv Hall was not dislocated by the earthquake 
shocks on New Year's Dav. It was the pressure of 
"tin- push" around the Mayor's office, rushing for 

prize places, that forced the tower out of joint. 

* * * 

When the Sovereign Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows 
met in this city four months ago, the local committee 
raised $9,000 by subscriptions from people who were 
not members of the order, in addition to the $20,000 
contributed by members. Recently, after all the bills 
of the celebration had been paid, a surplus remained 
in the treasury, and the committee lias fust distrib- 
uted this surplus among the subscribers who were 
not members of the order. There was enough money 



DUC DE MONTEBELLO 

CHAMPAGNE 

FROM THE OLD 'WINERIES 
OF THE DUKES OF OR- 
LEANS ^ -^ V» *• 

Mareuil -sur - ay - France 




January 7. 1905. 

left to return 

per orthy thai 

this is the tir^i time in this which any one 

that tin-.. Is subscribed to a pubhc 
rtainmeni r been returned to the sub- 

vhich had charge of the 
financial cml of the convention deserves great praise 
■ heir administration of affairs, and for returning 
the unusued money t.. those who had contributed it. 
Such excellent management will make it easier in 
the future to secure funds for great |>nl>lic entertain- 
ments. 

• * * 

A visitor to the Park started to walk down a path 
which the omnipotent police, without any warrant of 
law, hail ordered closed. A policeman ordered 
the gentleman to leave the path. The visitor re- 
fused, and thereupon the policeman arrested him. 
Then the indignant visitor sued the policeman for 
false imprisonment, and Judge Seawell has given 
judgment against the bluecoat. The court found, 
however, that as the officer was simply obeying the 
orders of his superior officers in keeping the path 
clear, and in arresting the complainant, that no 
malice was shown, and therefore, only nominal dam- 
ages were awarded. The court took occasion, how- 
ever, to point out very clearly that the police cannot 
make laws nor issue regulations for their own bene- 
fit. The Park belongs to the people, and any person 
who conducts himself in an orderly manner certainly 
has the absolute right to walk upon any of its paths 
so long as in doing so he does not transgress the law. 
If the police would display as much zealousness in 
arresting real offenders against the law, as they do 
in running in small boys and pleasure seekers in the 
parks, the city would speedily be entitled to a better 
bill of health than at present. 

* * * 

The commission appointed by the Governor to in- 
vestigate the charges against the State Board of 
Pharmacy has found that the members of the Board 
are too susceptible to feminine charms. They are 
warned to beware of women who assume "a kittenish 
appearance."' One of these kittenish women, the 
Commission says, was present at an examination of 
applicants to practice pharmacy, and though she was 
apparently as coy and shy as a debutante through- 
out the proceedings, it is found by the investigators 
that, as a matter of fact, she was prompting her 
friends the whole time. Hereafter, kittenish women, 
gushing girls, and willowy widows will be barred 
from the examination room. The members of the 
Pharmacy Board are not proof against them. 

* * ■:■ 

Professor George Davidson calmly "tells us that 
our recent earthquake shocks are of a geotectonic 
variety, whatever that may be, and that they are 
really not worthy of consideration. The four shocks 
on New Year's day were all parts of one real earth- 
quake, says the Professor, and they were all due to 
a new adjustment of the earth's surface, caused by 
shrinkage. That is all very interesting and very 
satisfying, but if the Professor would only find some 
way of fixing that shrinkage business so that old 
mother earth could draw up her wrinkles in a more 
calm and dignified manner, we would not be so 
shocked every time she tries to fold up a few laps. 
No doubt the whole business is the fault of the 
weather man. 

Only three 'hundred patriotic citizens fell off the 
water wagon on New Year's eve, and were given 
lodgings in the city prison. That shows that San 
Francisco is improving as a center of high morality 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



<3 



and dignified deportment When il dered 

that there an in San Francisco, and 

that 3,900 of them sell stuff that would make a hip- 
popotamus do the cake-walk, a bunch of 300 drunks 
is .1 small record for New Year's eve. Gentlemen, we 
reason to be proud of our capacity. 

The State Senators have decided to allow them- 
selves $20 a da) For patronage. That means that 
igh jobs «ill be handed out to allow each Senator 
to distribute among his constituents $20 on each 
lative day. I am surprised at the modesty of our 
makers. They make but little of their opportu- 
ne v. 



Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. 

74H Market street. San Francisco. 



Cooper 



GRAND CLEARANCE SALE OF 

Oriental Rugs 

at 40 per Cent Discount 
on our Sale Prices 



To make an effective clearance sale and realize 
cash, we are giving actual 40 per cent discount on 
every rug. 



MIHRAN'S, 205 Post St. 

The oldest and most reliable rug house. 



Headquarters For Progressive Chiropody 

DRS. BROWN ®. LEANER. 

SURGEON CHIROPODISTS 

REMOVES CORNS ENTIRELY WHOLE (Painless) WITHOUT KNIFE, BUNIONS 
AND INGROWING NAILS CURED BY A SPECIAL AND PAINLESS TREATMENT. 
Hours: 9 to 6 p. m. Saturdays. 9 to 6 p. m. and 8 to 10 p. m. 

6 GEA'Ry ST'REET 



TelepKone BLACK 2702 



Junction Geary and Kearny 




TOM 

DILLON 

SCO. 

OPPOSITE 

PALACE HOTEL 

HAT OEDERB 



J- p. LACAZE & co. 

French Laundry Work Guaranteed 

The BEST in San Francisco 

829 SUTTER ST. TEL. EAST 615 



BUSWELL COMPANY 



636 Clay Street 



Bookbinder. Paper-ruler, Printer and Blank 
Book Manufacturer 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 



fhe REFLECTIONS 

0FA Knocker 



t^RyJohn We ndrick Jiangs. 




ON MRS. CHADWICK'S MISTAKES. 



"Yes, sir," said the Knocker, settling back in his 
chair, and cursing his cigar because it had dropped 
ashes all over his vest. "Yes, sir! I am for Mrs. 
Chadwick every time. There's a woman, by Jingo, 
that I approve of. You don't catch her sitting home 
all day embroidering mottoes on perforated card- 
board with pink and yellow floss, requesting the 
Lord to bless No. 62 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland ; put- 
ting up nineteen different kinds of raspberry jam 
from receipts in the Ladies' Home Journal, and wor- 
rying herself into a nervous fit because some astig- 
matic hen has laid an egg in her husband's new silk 
hat. She's not the kind of woman that makes her 
lord and master slave nineteen hours a day to keep 
her in sable boas and matinee tickets, and if she ever 
lost a minute's sleep because the cook, after drinking 
a quart of cooking sherry, scrambles the squab, and 
broils the French coffee pot for her little luncheon to 
the Dorcas Society of Colonel Rockefeller's little 
Standard Oil Chapel, she has successfully kept that 
moment of weakness from the public. When she 
needed $8,000,000 pin money to keep herself in tiaras 
or to buy ham sandwiches for the poor of Cleveland, 
she wouldn't get up in the dead of the night and go 
through her sleeping husband's pockets to get it, but 
she put on her hat, went out to Oberlin on the first 
train, and scooped in any little old National Bank she 
could find strolling about the camp'us. If her butcher's 
bill was a trifle larger than she expected it to be, did 
she compel the Doctor to go out and cut off some- 
body's leg in a quest for funds to meet the deficit? 
Not on your life. She bought a return ticket from 
Cleveland to Brookline, Massachusetts, and borrowed 
all the money in sight at 66 per cent interest. If a 
down-trodden cabman charged her $7.50 for a fifty 
cent drive from the Grand Central Station, New 
York, to the Holland House, did she write to the 
Mayor and have that poor laborer's license revoked? 
Never ! She paid up, and to make good the over- 
charge she appointed Andrew Carnegie trustee of 
her Sinking Fund of $10,000,000, drew sight drafts 
on it for $5,650,000, and issued these to holders of 
other Carnegie securities for cash at par. In every 
way she has shown herself a resourceful woman, 
and so considerate of the wage earners of her house- 
hold as to become one of the nineteen thousand won- 
ders of the world. I'm a single man myself, but I 
think if I could find a sweet young girl who would 
have some of that kindly consideration for her hus- 
band that this woman has shown for hers, I might 
be induced to risk my necK in the matrimonial noose." 



"And a pretty pass she has come to!" ejaculated 
old Redface. "With all her consideration for her 
family, and with all her resourcefulness, amounting 
to millions of dollars, where is she? In jail, Knocker, 
my boy, and likely to remain there for some time to 
come!" 

"Oh, tush, Redface!" retorted the Knocker. "A 
man of your usual good sense doesn't blame the wo- 
man for that, I hope. It isn't her fault that she is in 
jail. It's the fault of this rotten system of ours, 
which frowns upon every woman who goes out into 
the world and tries to do something for herself. From 
the days of Joan of Arc down to this moment, it has 
been the same. What happened to the lovely Joan 
is now happening to Mrs. Chadwick. Joan put on a 
Major-General's uniform and loaded her Mauser, 
sharpened up her sword and went out into the field 
and walloped everything in sight. Result, she was 
put in jail, and burned at the stake. Mrs. Chadwick 
turns herself into a Captain of Finance, loads her 
note book to the muzzle, sharpens up her wits and 
goes out into the field and puts all the National 
Banks in Ohio to flight, casts the Steel Trust into 
the shade, and gives the leading money kings of the 
hour a pain in the back that utterly destroys all their 
powers of locomotion. Result, she, too, is cast into 
prise m and roasted by the press from one end of the 
country to the other. It's all because she is a woman 
and because we of to-day like the men of old want to 
keep the sex in subjection. Maybe it's wise on our 
part, but it's wrong just the same. It would interfere 
materially with man's comfort if women were permit- 
ted to develop their intelligence to the full, and were 
fitted by education to get into competition with us 
lords of creation. When we see a cheap little Willie- 
boy smoking cigarettes and drinking cocktails, we 
tell him what a fine man he is, and make him a direc- 
tor of a Bank, and mention his name for the Legisla- 
ture, but if we see a woman doing the same thing, 
we hold up our hands in holy horror and ask ourselves 
what the world is coming to. When a man has 
learned how to use all the cuss-words in creation, to 
talk loud, to wear a big diamond in his shirt-front, 
and to keep his right hand from knowing what his 
left hand does with the campaign funds, we make 
him a Governor or a Senator or a Member of Con- 
gress, but if his wife joins a woman's club and tries 
to do something to make the railway companies sup- 
ply their motor-men with ear tabs during the winter 
season, there isn't a tuppenny joker in the land who 
doesn't feel that he is entitled to write funny para- 



January 7. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTLR. 



15 



graphs about licr ami to make licr name a part of 

- 

uig destroys your p'>uii "t 
sic»\ lias not lliis woman 

committed a crime?" 

"That's juat the questi rted the Knocker. 

"Has \ line in crime? Well, let's 

What has the lady done? As I understand it. 
she b Ited a l"t of worthless securities. She 

umped a lot ut Carnegie notes that Mr. Carnegie 
never saw, on the market, ami she has made a pile 
of money out of them." 

"IV said old Redface. 

"In other words, she has got something for noth- 
ing by the exercise 01 her wits, ami being a woman, 
i> now in jail for it," said the Knocker. "So far so 
Now, let us look at the masculine side of it. 
Four years ago the Hon. |. W. Bolivar, the Hot Air 
King of til.- World, decided that he was getting too 
old to work eight hours a day, so he gathered all his 
Hot Air plants together, and had 'em appraised. 
They were found to be worth about $350,000,000. 
Then he calls in Mr. I. Hammersley Workemoff, the 
great reorganizer, and between them they cook up a 
scheme to sell these Hot Air plants to the public. 
They get out first, second and third mortgage bonds 
to the value of $350,000,000. These, Bolivar and 
Workemoff divide between themselves. Then they 
issue two grades of stock, $350,000,000 worth of pre- 
ferred shares, $350,000,000 worth of common shares, 
making the total liability of the Hot Air plants 
$1,050,000,000. The shares, both common and pre- 
ferred, they sell to the public at prices ranging from 
49 to 92 — in other words, using the exact value of the 
plants as an offset to the bonded indebtedness which 
they keep for themselves — they coin $0,000,000 worth 
of stock into $493,500,000 good, hard, round American 
dollars. In still further other words, for nothing they 
get nearly half a million. And what happens? Does 
Bolivar go to jail? No, sir. He is made an LL. D. 
by all the colleges in the land that need funds. He 
goes to. public dinners and airs his views on the Sim- 
ple Life. He presents medical schools to the Zulus, 
and endows chairs in Applied Christianity in the 
Universities of Thibet, Greenland and Madagascar, 
and has to employ nineteen secretaries working six 
hours a day to decline the invitations he receives 
to address religious organizations all over the coun- 
try. And Mr. J. Hammersley Workemoff — does he 
sleep on a folding bed in a Cleveland jail because he 
has pocketed the proceeds of his share of the Hot 
Air transaction ? Not he. He takes luncheon with 
the leading statesmen of the day, plays pinochle with 
the King of England whenever he goes to London, 
is a patron of science, and like the Hon. Bolivar, 
holds enough honorary degrees from needy colleges 
to paper the walls of the pyramids inside and out." 

"H'm — well, you're sore because you were bitten, 
I guess," laughed old Redface. 

"H'm — yes, I am," retorted the Knocker. "I'm 
just as sore against Bolivar and Workemoff because 
they have come into possession of my savings as 
Mrs. Chadwick's creditors are against her because 
all they got back from her enterprises was their own 
usurious interest charges." 

"Oh, well," said Redface, rising. "You can talk as 
much as you please, Knocker. I guess time will show 
that this Chadwick woman has made a bad mistake." 

"She's made two of 'em," said the Knocker. "The 
first was in being born a woman, and the second " 

"She stole?" said Redface. 

"No," said the Knocker. "She tried to play the 
game of high finance without knowing how." 




Fine 



PLUMBING 




Good* 



Our new Show Rooms «re open 
to the public. You are invited to 
call and inspect our display of 

MODERN PLUMBING 
FIXTURES 

unequalled on the Pacific Coast. 
GEORGE H. TAT COMPANY 
49-53 First St. San Francisco 
Send to Booklet "MODERN BATH ROOM"." 



PACIFIC TOWEL COMPANY 

NO. 9 LICK PLACE. 

Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels, $1 per 
month, 12 hand or roller towels, $1.50 per 
month. Tel. Main 1780. 



"OOLD Sf AL" 
RUBBER (MODS 
THP. BEST MADE 



GOODYEAR'S 

Mackintoshes and 
Raincoats 

For Men. Women and Children. Any size 
any Quantity. 



Goodyear Rubber Co. 

R. H. Pease, President ' 

f. M, Sbepard. Jr., Treasurer 

C. P. Run yon, Secretary 

573-575-577 579 Market St. S. F. 

61-63-65-67 4th St., Portland, Or. 




"Wi-mi-li's, Rain Coat 



"The O'Hara a Livermore Studio 
of Applied Arts, 356 Sutter Street 
will make up in original designs, 
embroideries and brocades furn- 
ished by their customers" Of, 




¥' 



»*^ 



A n exclusive 

establishment 
where ladies and 
gentlemen can receive all at- 
tentions pertaining to the toi- 
lette, including all kinds of 
Hair and Scalp Treatment, 
Manicuring, Facial Massage, 
using either electrical or vi- 
bratory methods. 




121 GEARY STREET 



Suite 418 Starr Kim Bulldlur 



Telephone: Private BxcblDfe 214 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 



BANKING. 



BANKING. 



Wells Fargo & Co., Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Capital, Surplu^and Undivided j $16,000,000 

Homer S. King. President; P. L. Lipman, Cashier; Frank B. 
King. Assistant Cashier; Jno. E. Miles, Assistant Cashier. 

BRANCHES— New York; Salt Lake, Utah; Portland, Ore. 

Correspondents throughout the world. General banking busi- 
nes transacted. 

The SolIi Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco. 
James K. Wilson, President; Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier; Charles L. Davis, Asst. 

Capital. $500,000. Surplus and undivided profits, $1»0,000. 
Directors— William Pierce Johnson. Wm. J. Dutton, Geo. A. Pope 
C. S. Benedict, George Aimer Newhall, W. H. Talbot, H. D. 
Morton, Jas. K. Wilson. 

Agents— New York— Hanover National Bank, Chemical National 
Bank. Boston— National Shawmut Bank. Philadelphia— Drexel 
& Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St Louis— Mechan- 
ics' National Bank. Denver— National Bank of Commerce. Kan- 
sas Citv— First National Bank. London— Brown. Shipley & Co. 
Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. Johannesburg— Robinson South 
African Banking Co., Ltd. 

The Ca.n»Ldian BeLnkof Commerce 

With which is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 
Paid-up Capital, $S,700,000. Reserve Fund, $3,500,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $90,000,000. 
HON. GEORGE A. COX, President. 
B. E. WALKER. General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, Cranbrook, 
Fernie, Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson. 
New Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and Shagway (Alaska). 
Also 92 other branches, covering the principal points in 
Manitoba. N. W. Territories, and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, the Bank of 
Scotland, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd. The Union of London and Smiths 
Bank. Ltd. . , 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 

San Franoisco Office 325 California Street. 

A. KAINS, Manager. Bruce Heathcote, Asst. Manager. 

London, Pa.ris and American Bank. Ltd. 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,500,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,100,000 
Head Office— 10 Threadneedle St., London, E. C. 
AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank. Limited. No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. 
I.azard Freres & Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 

credits issued. n „„„ „ ^ „ 

S1G GREENEBAUM, Manager; H. S. GREEN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The Anglo-Cevlifornia.n Bank. Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized. $6,000,000 Paid-up, $1,600,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
make telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buvs and sells exchange and bullion. 

1GN. STE1NHART, P. N. ULIENTHAL, Managers. 
T. FR1EDLANDER, Cashier. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS— William Alvord. William Babcock, S. L. Abbot, 
O. D. Baldwin, L. F. Monteagle, Warren D. Clark, E. J. McCut- 
chen, R. H. Pease, J. D. Grant. 

4 1-2 Per Cent Interest PaJd 

Phoenix Servings B. (Si. L. Association 

Pays Ws per cent interest on ordinary savings accounts, interest 
compounded semi-annually, and 5 per cent on term accounts of 
$100 or more, interest payable semi-annually. 

516 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

Subscribed Capital $8,000,000 

Paid-in Capital 1,250,000 

Guarantee Capital 200,000 

Real estate loans made On improved property, principal and In- 
terest payable in monthly installments similar to rent. 

DIRECTORS 

A. A. Watkins, Charles R. Bishop, S. Prentiss Smith, George 
C. Boardman, Charles E. Ladd, Gavin McNab. Clarence Grange, 
Managing Director. 



International Banking Corporation 

NO. 1 WALL STREET, NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid in $1,947,200.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 3,947,200.00 

BRANCHES— London, Washington, San Francisco, City of 
Mexico. Panama. Yokohama, Kobe. Manila, Cebu, Shanghai, 
Bombay, Calcutta, Singapore, Hong Kong, Canton. 

FISCAL AGENTS for the United States In China, the Philippine 
Islands and the Republic of Panama. 

General banking business transacted. Accounts of corporations, 
firms and individuals solicited. Foreign and domestic exchange 
bought and sold. Travelers' and commercial letters of credit 
granted, available in any part of the world. Interest bearing 
certificates of deposits Issued for fixed periods. Interest allowed 
to banks on current daily balances. Special rates given to 
banks drawing direct on our branches and agents throughout 
the world. 

Correspondents In all parts of the world. CORRESPONDENCE 
INVITED. William H. High, Manager. 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH— Corner Sansome and Bush Sts. 



San Francisco Ssvvings Union 

532 California St., cor. Webb St. San Francisco. 

E. B. POND. President; W. C. B. DeFREMERY, ROBERT 
WATT. Vice-Presidents; LOVELL WHITE, Cashier; R. M. 
WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— E. B. Pond, W. C. B. DeFremery, Henry F. Allen. 
Wakefield Baker. Jacoh Barth. C. O. G. Miller. Fred H. Beaver. Wil- 
liam A. Magee. Robert Watt. 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks 
of reliable parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsi- 
bility of this savings bank commences only with the actual re- 
ceipt of the money. The signature of the depositor should ac- 
company the first deposit. No charge Is made for pass book 
or entrance fee. 

Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

Deposits June 30, 1904 (33.940,131 

Guarantee Capital, Paid-up 1,000,000 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 976,109 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

710 Market St, opposite Third. 

Guarantee Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 535,000 

Deposits, over 9,000,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Presi- 
dent: JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President; GEORGE A. STORY 
Cashier; C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, J~ohn A. Hooper, 
James Moffttt Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels. James M. McDonald. Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent on postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 

The German Savings 6. Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,474,518 ftt 

Capital Actually Paid-up In Cash 1.000,000 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1904 37,281,377.60 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann; 
Ign. Stelnhardt, Emil Rohte, H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herr- 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Continental Building & Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 

301 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital $17,000,000.00 

Paid-in Capital 3,500.000.00 

Profit and Reserve Fund 460,000.00 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; William Corbln, Secretary 
and General Manager. 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital 13,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1,725,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or 
Trustee, Check accounts solicited, Legal Depository for money In 
Probate Court proceedings. Interest paid on Trust Deposit* and 
Savings. Investments carefully selected. 



January 7. 190s. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



J Financial 




The ore development in Opbir 

Pine-St. Market carried the stock up to $9 per 

share when the I '.card opened 

for business alter the New Year holidays. At tiie 

latest report, the winze going down from the 2O0O 

level, at a point 0S0 feet back from the south line, 

lown 67 feet in "re. the assays of which ran over 
per ton. This discovery is one of the most 
important ever made on the Comstock since bonanza 
days, not only on account 1 f its magnitude, but also 
on account of the quarter in which the find is located. 
There arc no old timbers io be dreaded, as the ground 
is practically virgin. While the stock may not run 
up into the hundreds, as ; t did then, owing to the 
different class of people who are likely to take a hand 
in the game, it is only natural to expect that the 
stock will rise to a level with the ore values devel- 
oped in the mine, a point which is still a long way 
off. So far, the market has responded to a small ex- 
tent, in sympathy with Ophir, but there is a time 
coming, and it is not far away, when developments in 
other quarters will place each section of the lode on 
an independent basis. Everything at present looks 
boom-like on the street, which is satisfactory for 

pening of the new year. 



The Tonopah-Goldfield market has been active 
during the week just past, considering the interven- 
tion of the holiday season. The total sales for the 
week ended December 30th, on the big board, were 
282,125, with a record of sales of 111,450 shares on 
the San Francisco and Tonopah Exchange. Mac- 
Namara advanced under heavy purchases and closed 
strong. Montana Tonopah weakened on an influx of 
stock. Red Top closed in demand at 16 cents. Sand- 
storm continued firm under news of improved min- 
ing conditions. There was little done in Tonopah 
Extension. The balance of the market was steady at 
the close. 

Now that the Legislature is in 

A Badly-Needed session, something ought to be 

Reform. done to regulate the control of 

the State Mining Bureau on a 
systematic basis, and in accord with other institutions 
of the kind the world over. It is safe to say that 
there is no other bureau of similar standing and im- 
portance where the trustees have little or nothing 
to say in the more essential details of the manage- 
ment. The present system is a relic of pioneer days, 
and the sooner~ it is blotted out the better for the 
mining interests of the State. The trustees should 
be placed in absolute control of the institution. Now 
they are figuratively responsible, but count for as 
much in point of utility as the fifth wheel of a coach. 
Now, the Governor, for the time being, appoints the 
trustees, and the same power selects the State Min- 
eralogist. The trustees should be empowered to ap- 
point all the employees of the bureau, from the State 
Mineralogist down, instead of having absolutely 
nothing to say in the selection of people for whose 
actions they are held responsible by the people of 
the State, who pay the money to support this institu- 
tion. Fancy the Regents of the University filling 
their office simply as ornaments, compelled to sit 
idly by, powerless, and see the actual work being 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 



ih« h 



ha rate of tl 

U 1 



:i" Miirk.'l Sir.. 1 



\ BTORT, Cuhla 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Continental Building and Loan Association, 
lias declared :i dividend f>>r the Bla 

ilium on ordinary 
cent "ii term deposits, and seven per cont on class "F" Install- 
ment DR. WASHINGTON DODGE. President. 
wm. CORBIN, Secretary. 
< iftlco— 301 California St. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the 31st of December. 1904, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate peT annum of three and 
one-half (3 1-2 ► per cent on term deposits, and three (3) per cent 
on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Tues- 
day, January 3, 1905. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

Office— 632 California Street, corner Webb. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31. 1904, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and one-quarter (3 1-4) per cent per 
annum on all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Tues- 
day, January 3, 1905. 

GEORGE TOURNT, Secretary. 

Offic— 526 California Street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending December 31, 1904, dividends have 
been declared on the deposits in the savings department of this 
company as follows: On term deposits, at the rate of 3 6-10 per 
cent per annum, and on ordinary deposits at the rate of 3 per 
cent per annum, free of taxes, and payable on and after Tuesday, 
January 3, 1905. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 

For the half year endiner December 31st. 1904, has declared a dividend 
on dbposits at the rate of three and one-quarter (3,'.,i percent pet- 
annum, free of taxes, payable on and after Tuesday, January :trd, 1905. 

W. E. PALMER. Cashier. 

626 Market street, opp Palace Hotel. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 

For half year ending December 31, 1904, dividends upon all deposits 
at the rate of three and one-quarter ( &4 ) per cent per an- 
num, free of taxes, will be payable on and after January 3. 1905. 

FEED W. KAY, Secretary. 
222 Montgomery St., Mills building. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

has declared a dividend for the term ending December 31, 1904, at 
the rate of three andone-quarter ( %%. ) per cent per annum on all 
deposits, free of taxes and payable on and after January 2. 1905. 

CYRUS W. OARMANY, Cashier. 
101 Montgomery st., cor. Sutter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held 
this day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one-half 
(3 fa) per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending 
December 31, 1904, free from all taxes, and payable on and after Janu- 
ary 3. 1905. ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 

Office— Cor. Market, McAllister and Jones sts., San Francisco, De- 
cember, 28. 1904. 



J. BARTH <& CO. 

BROKERS IN EASTERN AND LOCAL SECURITIES OE ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

New York Quotations Over Private Wire. Orders on New 
York Stock Exchange Promptly Executed. 

Correspondents: Herzog C&, Glazier; 40 New Street, New 
York. Scholle Bros., 30 Broad Street, New York. 

480 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main 5819 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 



PL 



AY 



S-PI 



'LA 1 

AND ^^ 

■entertainments 

Catalog of thousands sent Free ! Free! Free! 
Addriss SAM'L FRENCH, 32 W. 22d St., New York 



YS 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco California. 
Location of works, Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Nntice is hereby Riven, that at a meeting of the Board oi Directors, 
held on the nth day of Dec-. 1904. an assessment (No- 48) of ten cents 
per share whs levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, paynble 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary at the office 
of the Company, Ronm 29. Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco. California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
12th DAY OF JANUARY, 1906 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction and unless 
pavment is made before will be sold on Thursday, the 2nd day of 
February, 1905. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with 
cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. HAVENS. Secretary. 

Office— Room 22, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery st.. San Francisco. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Yellow Jacket Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of works. Gold Hill. Storey County, Nevada. Principal place 
of business. Gold Hill. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, of 
this Company held on the 6th day of D#c. 1904, an assessment (No. 
18) of ten cents per share was levied upon each and every share of 
the capital stock of the said Company, payable immediately to the 
Secretary at the office of the Company, or to James New'ands Jr., 
Transfer Secretary Room 35 Mills Bldg.. 3d flr., San Francisco. Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 11th. 1905 
will be deemed delinquent and will bedulv advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before will be sold on 
MONDAY, the 16th day of February 1905. at 4 o'clock p. m. in front of 
the office of the Company, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with the costs of advertising, and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Trustees. 

W. H. BLAUVELT. Secretary. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Mexican Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco. California 
Location of works. Storey County. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held on the tfth day of Dee. 1904. an assessment (No. 80) of 16 cents. 

fier share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
mmediately in United States gold coin, to the secretary, at the office 
of the Company. Room 79. Nevada Block. Sin) Montgomery street. 
San Francisco. Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE loth DAY OF JAN. 1905, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at puhlic auetion, and unless 
payment is made before, will he sold on Tuesday, the 31th day of Janu- 
ary t905.to pay the delinquent assessment together with costs of adver- 
tising, and expenses of sale. 
By Order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 
Office— Roatti 79. Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco. California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Andes Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco. Cal. Location 
of works, Virginia Mining Di trict. Htorey County. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held on the 22nd day of December. 1904, an assessment (No. fl2) of ten 
(10) cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation 
payable immediately in United States eold coin to the secretary at the 
office of the company, rooms 21 and 22 Nevada block, 309 Montgomery 
street, San Francisco. Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 2fith DAY OF JANUARY, 1906 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction ;and unless 
pavment is made before will be sold on FRIDAY, the 17th day of 
February. 1905, at l o'clock p. m.. to pay the delinquent assessment to- 
gether with the cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

JOHN TV. TWIGGS, Secretary. 

Office— Rooms 21-22 Nevada block, soo Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. 



TELEPHONE MAIN 1405 STALLS, U TO 100 CALIFORNIA MARKET 

Katz $ Sons, lnc 

Dealers in BEEF AND 

Ham. Bacon, L&rd, DAD1/ 

Smoked Beef. Mutton. "WKIV 

Torvg\j©s and all kinds of RDTrHFR^ 



carried on in accordance with their ideas or not, by 
another set of officials over whom they, who are sup- 
posed to be in actual control of all and everything 
connected with the institution, have no more to say 
than an outsider. The full control of the Mining Bu- 
reau should be invested in the trustees, who should 
be empowered to appoint a State Mineralogist, re- 
sponsible solely to them for his official acts. All 
work should be carried on by the State Mineralogist 
under the direction of the Board of Trustees, and he 
in turn should be allowed to employ his own assist- 
ants, assuming full responsibility for their conduct 
in the field. This would place the Bureau upon an 
independent footing, and increase its utility, freeing 
it from political influences which are anything but 
beneficial, to put it mildly. The matter is worthy 
the consideration at least of liberal minded men in 
the Legislature, who can readily perceive the pos- 
sibilities of evil results arising from questions of au- 
thority apt to arise at any time when two different 
powers are in control, a policy as unwise as it is 
unsafe. 



Will Mine for 
Alaska Tin. 



The Board of Directors of the 
Pacific Tin Mines Company, late- 
ly incorporated by John Par- 
tridge, Samuel Colclough, Bert 
C^rbcU, Joseph Murphy, P. B. Bowen and G. O. 
Frarcc, have just held their first meeting in the 
Stock Exchange Building. It was decided at that 
meeting that a limited number of shares of stock 
should be placed on the market at 50 cents per share, 
and that work should be begun on the property of the 
company which is situated in the Port Clarence Dis- 
trict in Alaska, early in the coming spring. The 
company holds consideraule property in this locality, 
all of which has been prospected and found to be rich 
in tin ore, assays of which run over 65 per cent in 
tin and from three' to four per cent in gold. The 
company's offices are temporarily located at room 
11, 320 Sansome street, in this city. The Pacific Tin 
Mines Company was incorporated with a capital of 
$200,000, divided into 200,000 shares of a par value 
of $1 each. 



The respectable mining element throughout the 
State has for some time past been decrying the op- 
erations of wild-cat promoters, the latter being in a 
measure protected from interference by the lack of 
any law which can be brought to reach them, so long 
as they cannot be convicted of robbery out and out. 
What is wanted is a law which will reach the com- 
pilors of a false and misleading prospectus, and the 
individual who, upon the strength of its statements, 
markets the shares on some wild-cat scheme upon 
innocent investors. It is difficult to frame a law of 
the kind, and one or two of the States have signally 
failed in their endeavor to do so, even New Jersey, 
which passed an incorporation law, based largely on 
the provisions of the English law, which is consid- 
ered about the best enactment so far of the kind. 
The trouble is, its provisions were not carried out in 
full. The New York Commercial News, in dealing 
with the subject, says: "In Great Britain not only 
must every new company issue and file a prospectus, 
but every money statement in the promotion scheme 
is considered as referring only to cash, unless plainly 
explained otherwise; every director and officer is 
held legally liable for the absolute truthfulness of 
the prospectus' statements; every director and officer 
is held liable as such until his formal resignation has 
been filed in the registrar's office and his successor 
has been officially elected or appointed and qualified ; 



January 7, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



and every director ami officer is held personal 
sponsible not only for prospectus statements made, 
but a] iny material fact. Thus, 

■ -it>lc all the time, and with- 
out limitations or exceptions." It the present I 
lattirc would model an enactment of the kind, il 
would assist materially in clearing the State of pettj 
larccnists who could fittingly I" 1 "sneak 

tliie\ 



INSURANCE 



The Stock anil Bond Exchange has taken pO! 
-ion of its new and handsomely appointed board- 
room in the Merchants' Exchange Building. There 
was a large attendance present at the opening cere- 
mony, with speech making by Edward Barry, presi- 
dent of the Hoard, and Edward l'ollitz, one of the 
leading operators on the floor. 

Local Savings Banks are now paying their regular 
semi-annual dividends on capital stock in the follow- 
ing amounts: Union Trust. $39,900; German Savings 
and Loan. $66,00O; Humboldt, $9,000; San Francisco 
Savings Union, $60,000: Savings and Loan, $20,000; 
Mutual, $9,000; Security, $9,000. 



The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society has just 
published its annual statement, and this statement 
goes to show the prosoerity of the working classes 
of San Francisco. This institution is the monument 
erected to the thrift of the sons and daughters of 
toil. It is their financial Gibraltar, the bulwark of 
their old age. The amount of deposits in this great 
institution on the 31st day of December, 1904, 
amounted to $58,648,182.32, and the total assets of 
the Society are $62,020,961.41. The moneys of this 
institution are invested solely in first-class securities, 
principally in San Francisco realty and bonds. 

C. E. Goldsmith, the engraver of 36 Geary street, 
is now with Sanborn, Vail & Co. He has charge of 
the engraving of wedding invitations, visiting cards, 
announcements, etc. Mr. Goldsmith's presence at 
Sanborn, Vail & Co.'s insures a continuance of the 
very best work that the engraver's art produces. 
Prices always right. 741 Market street. 




Craftsman" hand-made library table and 
armchair. 'Fumed" oak and exclusive- 
ly at 

Geary Street at Union Square 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $5,850,000 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital J3.000.000 

Surplus to Policy -holders 5,022,01$ 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 202 Pine St.. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 

Capital Paid-up, $3,44G.100. Assets. $24,662,043.35 

Surplus to Policy-holders, $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over $134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager, 501 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1860. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 5,172,036.00 

Surplus to Policyholders . . 2,441,485.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOTD, Agent for San Francisco, 216 Sansome Street. 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

Of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co.. Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 



Cash Capital, $200,000.00 



Cash Assets. 387.306.99 



PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

Home Office, 828 Montgomery St. San Francisco. 
Employers' Liability, Teams, Genera] Liability. Workmen's Collecthe 
Vessels, Elevators. 

Edmund P. Green, President; Ant. Borel & Co., Trees. John 0. Cole- 
man. Vice-President; Franklin A. Zane. Secretary; Frank P. Deering. 
Counsel. 

MARSHAL A. FRANK. General Aeent for California. Hay- 
wards Building. 

Organized 1853. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Capital $3,000,000 

Gross Cash Assets 17,300,000 

Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary tojourners 
anywhere in United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance epaintt 
loss by Fire. Lightning, 'Windstorm or Tornado. Indemnity for Loss 
of Rental Income by Pire or Lightning. 
H. L. ROFF. General Agent. 
GEO. M. MITCHELL, Metropolitan Manager. 
210 SANSOME STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

if Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Agt, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 




I -went to the Alcazar Theatre on last Tuesday 
night, partly, of course, to see the show, but princi- 
pally to see and take in the crowd. I knew that this 
popular house was doing' a land-office business, but 
I must admit that I was unprepared for the crush of 
fashionables that met my eyes when I got down- 
stairs. Every box was taken, filled with pretty wo- 
men and well-groomed men, and the whole house 
was sold out. It was the best-dressed house I had 
seen in a long time, and the genial manager in- 
formed me that they could have sold .out twice over. 

During the evening, Mother Earth gave a slight 
shaking up, but nothing could mar that perform- 
ance. I am not going to attempt to write about it. 
My confrere has alreadv done that most ably, but 
I am very glad I had an opportunity of seeing "Old 
Heidelberg" played as it was by the Alcazar stock 
company. Lillian Lawrence, John Craig and Mr. 
Maher are worth coming a long way to see and hear, 
and I can only bless my luck for having had the op- 
portunity. 

It seems to me that with ease this play could run 
at this cozy theatre for many weeks. This rests, of 
course, with the public, and has nothing to do with 
the critic. 




James Corrigan, Central Theatre. 
* * * 

Sunday afternoon last, at the Orpheum, will be 
remembered by the audience of that house for many 
a day to come. First of all, the show is a very com- 
plete one, and its value has been tremendously en- 
hanced by the Four Bards, athletes of a very high 
order. As a rule, feats of strength have only a pass- 
ing interest for the onlooker, but these boys are a 
revelation in the possibilities of equilibrium and bal- 
ancing. Their work is the cleanest cut I have ever 
seen, and they alone are worth the price of admis- 
sion. In the second place, old Mother Earth took 
it into her head to give a few stunts on her own ac- 
count, and during the atternoon, shook the audience 
up considerably. Fortunately, we are so accustomed 
to these little vagaries of the old lady that beyond a 
little scream here and there, they passed unnoticed. 
Jen Latona was in the middle of one of her pretty 
songs when the second one came, and for a moment 
her voice wavered, but quick as a flash she was her- 
self again, and was singing as sweetly as ever. 
Clarice Vance repeated her success of last week, and 
the great road show is running on greased wheels. 



The Alcazar's twice-deferred production of "Lost 
River" will be presented next week. The Alcazar- 
ians act with equal facility in romantic drama, farce, 
problem play and melodrama. "Lost River" is a 
blending of farce and melodrama, written by Joseph 
Arthur, and crowded with unique sensational effects. 
To follow, January 16th, comes the first local produc- 
tion of "The Girl and the Judge," a celebrated Clyde 
Fitch comedy, in which Annie Russell starred. And 
this will be followed by a spectacular production of 
Paul Potter's powerful play, "The Conquerors." 




Blanche Dayne, who will present "Town Hall 
To-night," with Will M. Cressy, at the Orpheum, 
Sunday afternoon. 



Musical San Francisco will soon know the joys and 
thrills of a genuine grand opera season. The per- 
formances will be given in San Francisco's home of 
grand opera, the famous Tivoli. The date set for the 



January 7. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



■ -■•ii 1- Wednesday . 
January nth. The great run of "King Dodo" will 
with the Sunday night performance, January 
8th, and the theatre will remain dosed until Wed- 
iic sale of reserved seats is now in 
: the Tivoli. The prices 
will range from two dollars to fifty cents. Th> choice 
for an opening opera has not been decided. The 
lull list of operas in the company's roster is found in 
the following: "Faust," 'The l'earl Fishers," "Mil- 
lion." "Manon," "I.akme," "Rigolecto," "Somnam- 
bula," "La Traviata," "Dinorah, "Pagliacci," "Cav- 
alleria Rusticana." "Lucia," "Puritam," "The Bar- 
I Seville," "La Tosca," "Adrian Lacouvreiere," 
"Fedora," "Andre Chenier," "Zaza," "Carmen," "La 
Boheme," and "Manon Lescaut." 
* * * 

Mr. Jacob A. Riis. the noted writer, reformer, and 
lecturer, whom President Roosevelt calls "the most 
useful citizen in Xew York," will lecture at the Al- 
I amlira Theatre Monday t veiling, January 9th, on 



11 
addition to the presentation of "The Darling of the 

tmds." Mi>s Bates's las) week will lie marked liv 
the production of Ibsen's "Iledda Gabler," .it a 
ial matinee next Tuesday afternoon, .h 2:30 o'clock, 
and Shakespeare's "The laming of the Shrew" at 

the same hour next Thursday afternoon. Sundav 

matinee January 15, John C. Fisher's stupendous 

musical production, "The Silver Slipper." will begin 
an engagement al I he 1 ,rand Opera House. 

* * * 

After the storm comes a lull; no more daggers and 
pistols at the Central for a week. Melodrama will 
lie laid away in a dustv nook next week, and a real 
old-time minstrel show with leading man and villain 
spinning jokes will be in order. There will be other 
good things, too. Every member will sing or dance. 
or — or something else. Don't believe the advance 
notice that says its the greatest ever, but go and have 
a laugh yourself. 

* * * 

Will M. Cressy and Blanche Dayne, producers and 




Amateur Theatricals at Stanford University. 

"Tony's Hardships," dealing with the problems of 
the city street boy. The civic department of the 
California Club has secured this notable attraction 
for the purpose of calling attention to the work for 
the "Citizen of To-morrow," which Mr. Riis so suc- 
cessfully inaugurated in New York City; and with 
the intention of raising funds by which similar work 
in this city, in which the California Club is inter- 
ested, may be advanced. 

# # * 

Blanche Bates will begin the third and last week 
of her triumphant engagement at the Grand Opera 
House next Monday night, in David Belasco's won- 
derful production, "The Darling of the Gods." In 



universal favorites, will begin a limited engagement 
at the Orpheum, Sunday afternoon, presenting Mr. 
Cressy's latest one-act comedy, entitled "Town Hall 
To-night." Mr. Cressy's character is that of "Hip 
Flitters," the janitor, manager, stage manager, stage 
carpenter, property man, electrician, bill poster treas- 
urer and pianist of the Town Hall, where Miss 
Dayne, as "Miss Genevieve Montmorency," the lead- 
ing lady of "The Elite Repertoire Company," plays 
"for one night only." Miss Nita Allen, a beautiful 
and piquant actress, supported by Clicord Dempsey, 
the well-known leading man ; Chassine, shadow- 
grapher; Josie Kine and Phil Gotthold will present 
"A Medical Discovery;" H. V. Fitzgerald, Winfield 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Douglas and Margie Ford, the Four Bards, Eleanor 

Falke, the singing comedienne, and the Orpheuni 

Motion Pictures are the remaining numbers of the 

programme. 

* * * 

Vaudeville again holds sway at the Chutes, and 
for the coming week the programme is very alluring. 



ceivable style of moving picture, 
varied and interesting bill. 



January 7, 1905. 
will complete a 



Melba, the great song bird, will be here within a 
few weeks, and will maxe her appearances at the Al- 
hambra Theatre under the direction of Gottlob, Marx 
i\: ( ompany. She will be heard only twice, and at the 




Edna Elsmere, Central Theatre. 

It is headed, by Ernest Wilson and Marie Leicester, 
who present a very neat singing act, which they en- 
title "Love Stories Told in Song." The four Gor- 
dons will give an exhibition of acrobatic skill, and 
Dan Russell and Blanche U'Neil promise five laughs 
a minute in their skit, "Sullivan, the Coachman." 
"The Burton Bell Ringers," who offer capital enter- 
tainment; Eldridge, who makes wonderful portraits 
and pictures with sand; Mabel Lamson, the alwavs 
welcome singer of illustrated songs, and the Ameri- 
can biograph and animatoscope, showing every con- 



coucerts will be assisted by baritone Gilibert, tenor 
Van Hoose, the great harpist, Sassoli, and an orches- 
tra ol fifty. It js now five years since Melba has 
been heard in San Francisco, and her coming concerts 
will undoubtedly lie the great musical events of the 
present reason. The dates for the concerts are Tues- 
day night, February 7th, and Friday night, February 
I Oth. 

* * * 

Tin' presentation of Wagenhals and Kemper's gor- 
geous production of "Salammbo," by Frederick 



January 7. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»3 



I Kathryn Kidder, at the Colombia Thea- 
ning, promises lo be ■ gala 

Manag ilials and 

Kemper have provided a prodaction which, it is said, 
whole glittering series of tin- Sardou 
■Iran; zinal and melodious incidental music, 

bj llcur\ K. Ilarillov. is a prominent fea- 
ture of tin- production. Prominent in the big cast are 
■ii Harris, Thos. Coffin Cooke, Augustus 
Balfour, Harry Barton, Iua Brooks, Irene Osier, and 
little Walter i'.urri>. < Iwing to the engagement be- 
ing limited t" one week only, there will be matinees 
on Wednesday and Saturday. 




William Collier, who will shortly appear at the 
Columbia Theatre. 

* * * 

Edna Wallace Hopper, who has become one of the 
most popular figures on the American stage, is com- 
ing here for the first time since her appearance with 
De Wolf Hopper at the Baldwin Theatre, and will 
appear in a strong double bill, comprising Arthur 
\V. Law's comedy, "A Country Mouse," and the one 
act curtain raiser entitled "The Lady's Maid." 

When Melba appears at the Alhambra Theatre, 
she will have with her the remarkable young harpist, 
Sassoli. This artist is the protege of the great diva, 
and accompanied her during her recent Australian 
trip. In that country the harpist was accorded com- 
mendation of the highest order. On the present tour, 
American music lovers have received her playing 
with marked approval. 

* * * 

Harry Mestayer is about to begin a limited en- 
gagement with Belasco and Mayer, and will appear 
with their stock companies and in special Ibsen mat- 
inees at the Alcazar, as well as the Belasco theatre 
at Los Angeles. A matinee of "Ghosts" will be given 

at the Alcazar on Thursdav afternoon, January 19th. 

* * * 

John Drew has closed the most successful New 
York engagement he has played in a number of sea- 
sons. His production of the "Duke of Killicrankie" 
had a run at the Empire of over one hundred per- 
formances. 

* * * 

E. H. Sothern and Julia Marlowe will include the 
"Merchant of Venice" in their repertoire for next 
season. 



Columbia Tbeatre. ■«— J^A,?*™^ 

Hi'k'lniilng DUCl Mimility. HotlllMt WcdDMdftf and Satur-htf 

Frederick Kathirn 

WflRDE and KIDDER 

In WaKi>iihult* ami Kemper's stupendous M«Ola production ..f 

SALAMMBO 

(The Daughter of Hamllcur) By Stanislaus Stange. 
Jan. 16— Edna Wallace Hopper. 



Central Theatre. 



Belasco &. Mayer, proprietors 
Market st., near 8th, Phone South 633 
Ha! Ha! It Is to laugh- 
Beginning Monday Jan. 9. Matinees Saturday and Sunduy- 
The Central Theatre Stock Company In 

MINSTRELS 

Sungs, acts, specialties and plenty of fun. 
Prices evening 10c to 60c. Matinees toe, 16c. 25c. 

Tivoii Opera House. °° rner ^Lon'st™.,. 

List uightsof the Tivoii success 

KING DODO 

Begins Mouday evening January 2nd- 

GRAND OPERfl 

In Italian 
Season oppns on Monday January llth. 
Reserved seats now on sale. Prices, $2, tl.eo, $1. 50c. 
Orders by mail, accompanied by check or money older, will 
receive attention in the order in which they are received. 



Graod Opera House 



Last week begins Monday nest, January 9th 
David Belasco presents 

BLANCHE BATES 

In the drama of Old Japan 

THE DARLING OF THE GODS 

Matinee Tuesday, "Hedda Gabler." 
Matinee Thursday, "The Taming of the Shrew." 
.Matinee Saturday' "The Darling of the Gods," 
Beginning Sunday matinee Jan. 16— "The Silver Slipper." 

AlravoK- TKanhi-Q Belasco & Mayer, Proprietors 

HlCdZdl ineutre e. D. Phiob. Gen'l. Mer. Tel. Alcazar 

One week commencing Monday January 9, 

Regular matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

The Alcazar Stock Company in Joseph Arthur's famous play 

LOST RIVER 

With its marvels of realism. First San Francisco production. 
Mon. Jan. 16.— Clyde Fitch's comedy 

THE GIRL flND THE JUDGE 

As played by Annie Russell. 

Evenings 25c, to 75c. Matinees 25c, to 50c. 

Hi-nhoi ikt\ O'Farrell St., 

KJ r pneU IT) . bet. Stockton and Powell Sts. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, Jan. 8. 

ENTIRE NEW SHOW 

Will H. Cressy and Blanche Dayne ; Eleanor Falke ; Miss Nita 
Allen and Company; Chassino ; Kine and Gotthold; H. V. Fits- 
gerald ; Douglas and Ford ; Orpheum Motion Pictures and last 
week of 

THE FOUR BflRDS 

Matinees every Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday 
Prices 10. 26 and soc. 



(liter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the 
theatre is over. 



VISIT THE HOFFMAN CAFE 

LUNCH, GRILL AND WINE ROOMS 

Fine Goods a Specialty. Merchants' hot lunch from n a. m. to 
2:30 p. m., served also in Ladies' Oafe- Steaks, English Chops, 
Chicken, Oyster Loaves, Salads and all delicacies a specialty. 
Handsomest Cafe in America. Open all night. Private Dining 
Rooms for Ladies and Escorts. Charles Hildebrecht. Mgr. 
HOFFMAN CAPE, Props. Half a block below Palace and Grand Hotels. S. P. 



2 4 



We invite your inspection of our new and 
latest styles of Carriages, Traps, etc., just ar- 
rived from the East. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. January 7> 1905. 

THeir New Year's Resolutions 



1 


% 







Our Wicker Carriages and Pony work 
specialty. 



o F. Willey $ Company 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



FINE CARRIAGES, HARNESS, ROBES 
and WHIPS of Every Description 



1622-1628 MARKET STREET 

Under St. Nicholas Hotel. 



Dominican 
College 



FOR YOUNG LADIES 

Conducted by the Sisters of 
St. Dominic. Full college 
course of studies. Modern 
building; steam heated. Un- 
surpassed beauty and health- 
fulness. Address, 

Mother Superior 

Dominican College 
San Rafael, Cal. 



To admire my bulk only thrice a day, since Peter 
Dunne, who is a vainer man, as surely all the world 
knows, smiles with satisfaction at his shadow at 
lease five times between breakfast and dinner. — Col. 
Kowalsky. 



To make solemn affidavit, as often as may be nec- 
essary, that at no time can proof be established that 
at any time has my palm been crossed with Chinese 
gold. — Chief Wittman. 



To refuse to be the "fall guy" for any combination, 
and to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing 
but the truth — if I have to. — Sergeant Ellis. 



To accept transportation expenses and a per diem 
to appear as a minor attraction at all will contests. — 
Addizon Mizner. 



To bag Chinese gamblers whenever the Fever is 
upon us, and to laugh at all laws that may interfere 
with our Napoleonic plans. — The ( irand Jurors. 



To fling away political ambition, and to remember 
that some Republicans, like all Republics, are un- 
grateful. — Jake Steppacher. 



To show the people of California that I am part 
of the Governor some of the time, some of the Gov- 
ernor all of the time, and all of the Governor part of 
the time — but that there are others. — Governor Par- 
dee. 



To take every dollar in sight; to rob every gudgeon 
who comes within our inclosures : and to continue 
paying current rates for proper protection. — The 
Race Horse Pirate's. 



To always recollect that upon my shoulders rests 
the responsibility of manufacturing the history by 
which San Francisco shall be known in the ages yet 
to be. — A. Ruef. 



To distribute the loaves and fishes so that all the 
yawping months may be filled, and yet enough be 
left over to form a nucleus for a new campaign. — 
Mavor Schmitz. 



To remember that Father Time will catch me if he 
can, and that even I cannot deceive the calendar, and 
must, forsooth, soon pass into the class of "als 1 
rans." — E. M. Greenway. 



To profit by the experiences of the last campaign, 
and to combine with my friends, the recent enemy, 
to the end that my grasp may come closer to the City 
Hall.— Gavin McNab. 



To bear always in mind that the main object in 
life of the President of a State University is to en- 
deavor to be up to date in matters of dress; the rest 
is so easy. — President Wheeler. 



To continue hammering away with our biggest 
guns until something drops, or we are satisfied there 
is nothing there.' — F. J. Symmes. 



To forget that there ever was a Democratic party, 
lmt to remember that I yet live, and that the people 
still look to me as their savior From the oppression of 
all the wealth-cursed millions who follow the flag of 



January 7. 1905. 

1 
Hc.i- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

VID-ta-r.ir r.l. AY. K. i-i-^f-s-i-J-t-t...;;?-!^. ;.;.-. 



as 
-•■• •-..... 



Idition and multiplication, l>nt to pass 
forbidding 

•f a mis-spent political 
life, telling how and why it happened, and how it 
it i> all over. — E. I. Liveraash. 



-. check books, lei 
anil all other hooks that guide one in the measly 
marts of merchandise, and taking up arms against a 
;' troubles, show an expectant world just what 
kind of a man Shakespeare drew when he marie Shy- 
lock immortal. — Dick [totaling. 



To burn my diary and swear off on the habit of 
recording the whence and where and why. lest retri- 
bution arise in the night and smite me. — Harry Hol- 
brook. 



To be truthful if we must, but then only as long 
as some one is watching us, and is prepared to prove 
us various kinds of a liar. — The Boughton Bulletin. 



To never again expose my nether limbs to the criti- 
cal gaze of an artistic public, famous for its appre- 
ciation of the beautiful in nature. — William Greer 
Harrison. 



The Pacific Coast Advertising Men's Association 
is to meet in Fresno January 9th. The purpose of the 
meeting is to discuss plans for properly advertising 
raisins throughout the Eastern States. The raisin 
growers are to attend the session and listen to the 
advertising men's addresses and papers on this sub- 
ject, which is not only of interest to Fresno but is of 
importance to the State at large. The plans of the 
committee in charge in Fresno are about as follows: 
On the arrival of the delegates Sunday, January 8th, 
at noon, a special train will be run to Kearney Park 
- — an estate of 1,000 acres of vineyards, flowers and 
fruit ; an automobile ride of nine miles through Kear- 
ney avenue, one of the most beautiful driveways in 
California; lunch at the Calwa Winery — the largest 
in the State ; special train ride through the raisin 
districts around Fresno ; and a trolley trip over the 
electric lines. The banKers, merchants and adver- 
tising men of Fresno have planned to make the visit 
of the ad. men most enjoyable. The educational ses- 
sion will be held Monday, followed by a banquet in 
the evening. It is hoped that the meeting will re- 
sult in inducing the Raisin Growers' Association to 
appropriate $250,000 and extensively advertise raisins 
everywhere east of the Rocky Mountains. 

A French seeress sees all kinds of calamities in 
store for the nations, which will be scattered broad- 
cast during the year. A seer or seeress who sees no 
cash fee on the table is sure to see the wrong thing. 
The nations should chip m and hire her to take an- 
other peep into the unknown and unknowable, and 
discover better things. What fools we mortals be ! 

The management of the City and County Hospital 
of Whittier and of Napa show very clearly that it is 
an awful mistake to be sick, poor or insane in this 
community. 

The Overworked Eye. 

the Faded Eye, the Red and Inflamed Eye, the Eye that needs 
care, relieved by Murine Eye Remedy. An Eye Tonic. 




Time's Fruitage 



Age matures, ripens, enriches and 
purifies, hence the superb quality of 



Hunter 
Baltimore Rye 

The Highest Standard 

of the American 
Gentleman's WhisKey 



HILBERT MERCANTILE CO., 

136-144 Second Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Exchange 313 



<e>$xs>3><sxSKSxex3>$xexSK3K8xsxsx8xexe^^ 



TELEPHONE SOUTH 455 

H. ROSEKRANS ® CO. 

HARDWARE 

511 Sixth Street 

San Francisco 



Silver Dollar Wine Rooms 

PINE MERCANTILE LUNCH served every day from 11 to i 
o'olock. Finest Wines. Liquors and Clears. 

,<IEEBA ® DOLAN, Proprietors 

sia Sansome street, cor. Halleck, San Francisco. Tel. Black 602 



H. ISAAC JONES, M. D. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Office— Starr King Building, 121 Geary street, San Francisco. 
Rooms, 303, 304, 306. Hours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m,, 2 to 4 p. m. Sun- 
day by appointment. Telephone, Private Exchange, 216. Resi- 
dence, corner 6th avenue and 16th St, Oakland. Tel. Eaat 31. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January y, 1905. 




THE AUTOMOBILE 




Because of some rumors which have been spread 
regarding the price of the Winton touring cars for 
the season of 1905, Mr. Brinegar, president of the 
Pioneer Automobile Co., has just issued the follow- 
ing circular letter to prospective purchasers, viz : 
"Because of the fact that Alexander Winton has list- 
ed 1905 Winton cars at prices fully $1,000 less than 
those of equal horse-power sold by other manufactur- 
ers, the rumor has been circulated by some of our 
competitors that the Association will force him to 
raise prices to the standard. The purpose of this 
rumor is to make our customers believe that we shall 
not be able to deliver Winton cars at the prices at 
which we have advertised them. The rumor is ab- 
solutely without foundation. In the first place, the 
Association has no power over the prices of the Win- 
ton Company. In the second place, we have a con- 
tract with the Winton Company whereby our prices 
cannot be raised. And in the third place, the Winton 
Company has always lived up to its price and other 
agreements with dealers and purchasers. The rea- 
son why the Winton Company can afford to sell cars 
of sterling value at prices $1,000 below the market 
standard is due to the fact that the Winton factory 
is one of the largest ana best-equipped automobile 
plants in the world. Its manufacture is systematized. 
Its cars are m'ade in lots of i,coo, with all parts in- 
terchangeable." 



Among the recent purchasers A Packard automo- 
biles in this city are Dr. rt . K. Marshall and P. Geo. 
Gow. Both placed their orders at the Packard fac- 
tory. Dr. Marshall made a special trip East to in- 
spect the 1905 cars, and will soon have one of the 
new four-cylinder Packard side-entrance cars. Mr. 
Gow, after touring through Europe and inspecting 
French and German cars, on his return home placed 
his order for a 1905 car. 



The Inter-Club Challenge Trophv. shown here- 
with, manufactured by Hammersmith & Field, gold 
and silversmiths, has been presented by L. P. Lowe, 
of the Automobile Club of California,' to all of the 
automobile clubs of the State of California for per- 
petual competition, with a view of awakening and 
keeping alive interest in automobiling from numer- 
ous standpoints. The terms of the deed of gift are 
such as to keep it in constant circulation. The tro- 
phy, which is in the form of a silver cup, surmounted 
with cover and hgure statuette representing Pro- 
gress, is open for competition for all manner of 
events, including track racing, hill-climbing and road 
racing. The beautiful trophy has already twice been 
contested for at the Del Monte meet, and also at 
Los Angeles. Both times the A. C. C representative 
won the cup. 



"Rollin White, the designer of die White Steam 
automobile," says Automobile Topics, "was awarded 
a gold medal personally by the St. Louis Exoositicn; 
this in addition to the Grand Prize the White car r •- 
ceived." This is certainly a great honor bestowed o • 
Mr. White, as I believe it is the only personal award 
made at the World's bair to the designer of an au- 
tomobile. 




Trophy to be presented by Mr. L. P. Lowe. 



January 7. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



a 7 



Car Guaranteed to Carry 5 People 

on Road, a Mile a Minute 




TYPE VIII-30-38 H. P., 1905 POPE TOLEDO 

A Demonstrating Car of This Model 
Will Arrive January 1 Oth. 



Pope Toledo Touring Car Co. 

G. A. BOYER, Manager 



134-148 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



TELEPHONE SOUTH 1 1 42 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 




The illustration of the racing car shown here with is the enormous powered car built by the Electric 
Vehicle Company of Hartford, manufacturers of Columbia automobiles. In this time-destroying motor- 
car, Eddie "Cannon" Bald, the cycling champion of old, will go after fame in the fastest company on the 
automobile track. 



The world-girdling tour of Charles J. Glidden in 
his Napier automobile has commenced again. '1 lie 
Glidden party left Vancouver about two weeks ago 
bound for the Antipodes to resume the second half 
of the Boston motorist's trip around the world in an 
automobile. His first stop was at Honolulu, where 
he had his car swung ashore for a six hours' stay, 
during which time he toured in the vincinity ot 
Honolulu. According to his schedule, the next stop- 
ping place will be the Fiji Islands, where, in a ten- 
days' stay, Mr. Glidden expects to cover at least 
1,000 miles. This will be the first motor car to tour 
that part of the world. New Zealand will be the next 
place where a motoring feat will be attempted. This 
will be the attaining ot the most southerly point (in 
the globe on which their exists a highway. As Mr. 
Glidden has already the honor of being the first to 
cross the Arctic Circle, his attempt in the land of the 
Southern Cross to win fresh honors will be watched 
with interest by motorists all over the world. 
* * * 

With the minor differences which threatened re- 
cently to breed trouble in the successful management 
of the automobile speed races, the end of January, 
on the Otmond-Daytona Beach, Florida, entirely 
cleared away, automobilists, whether speed enthu- 
siasts or not, are looking forward to the results of 
that week's meet with the keenest interest. The fact 
that the contests are open to the world, the invita- 
tion plan as adopted last year being abandoned, will 
greatly enhance the entries, and in many of the more 
important contests a number of heats will undoubt- 
edly be run. 

The races held on the beach last' year, and the re- 
markable records then recorded, have made a strip 
of shore at that section of the long Florida beach 
famous throughout the world, wherever automobiles 



J5he *G& int on 9 s 

NEW TYPE 4 CYLINDER VER- 
TICAL MOTOR IS A WONDER 

Is pleasantly simple and practical, surprisingly efficient, and, in 
the matter <>f direct accessibility of every working part, has 
everything else ' driven to the timber." It presents something 
-1. .-lrvrr -,i- i" remove i he cause of those annoying difficulties 
whluh have accompanied the four-cylinder vertical motors that 
have gone on the market to date- 




Model C. 16-20 h. p. U cylinder) 
Model B, 24-30 h. p. U cylinder) 
Model A. 40 h. p. (4 cylinder) - 
Model A, special U cylinder) 



$1. 950 

2,650 
3.650 
4,650 



To secure first delivery put 
in your order at once 

If machine on arrival is not perfectly satisfactory we will freely 
refund all deposit. If you are interested call on us. or send your 
address 

PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 



901-925 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



January 7. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ag 



\V. K. Varuli-rbilt startled all speed auto- 

•nl^ for .1 
mile iracy 

his ninety 

n machine five miles in 3.31 3-5; 

■ ! nity iir ;■». Tl ese rec- 

ambition of many 

amateur automobilista and of many professionals t>> 

- them all, if pi 1 i> confidently expi 

that they will b I, the prediction being strong 

that the mile record will be cut to 30 seconds. 

* • * 

Lord Curzon states that be regards India a^ a 
country pre-eminently suited for the wide introduc- 
tion of the motor-car. "Expense," he observes, 
"may for a time retard it> employment except by the 
wealthy, or for public <>r official purposes. But in 
proportion a> the cost is cheapened, as it will be 
before long, SO will the motor-car come within the 
use of larger numbers, and with the llal and splendid 
roads that India | with the considerable 

distances that require to he traversed, with the many 
purposes that are capable of being served by motor- 
cars, and with a native population endowed with so 
much mechanical ingenuity, there can be little doubt 
that a great future lies before this means of locomo- 
tion. 

* * * 

Rudyard Kipling, the noted author, says that he 
became an automobilist seven years ago, in the days 
when six horse-power was reckoned a fair allowance 
for a touring car, and a speed of fifteen miles an liour 
was something to talk about. "My agonies, delays, 
road-walkings, and burns * * * all went to make 
the car of to-day safe and comfortable. Any fool 
can invent anything, as any fool can wait to buy the 
invention when it is thoroughly perfected; but the 
men to reverence, to admire, to write odes and erect 
statues to, ar*e those Prometheuses and Ixions — 
maniacs, you used to call us — who chased the in- 
choate idea to fixity up and down the king's high- 
way with their red white shoulders to the wheel. 
* * * Nowadays, my car helps me to live at a de- 
cent distance from any town without what the house 
agents call the amenities." 

* * * 

One of the Eastern journals recently published an 
article on the Development and Future of the Elec- 
tric Vehicle, and it said in part: "The electric vehicle 
undoubtedly has a great future before it. Much 
more so, indeed, than is appreciated at present by 
ultra gasoline enthusiasts and those unfamiliar with 
the mechanical attributes and possibilities of electric 
propulsion. With electric locomotives supplanting 
steam ones, and the electric street car girdling the 
United States, it must be evident that the electric 
road carriage is destined to cut an important figure 
in transportation, especially in our large cities." 

* * * 

Among the expert chaufifeuses who were out tour- 
ing about last Sunday were Mrs. J. J. Moore, Mrs. 
P. E. Bowles, Misses Grace and Lillie Spreckels and 
Mrs.. C. S. Middleton. The Spreckels girls had their 
Autocar runabout out for a spin, taking turns at 
operating the natty little motor vehicle. Master 
Bowles was driving the Autocar in which his mother 
was enjoying the beautiful weather. Mrs. Moore has 
been running her new Autocar quite frequently of 
late. 

Charles D, Blaney, of San Jose, is a most ardent 
motorist, and has not yet tired of running his White 
steamer about in the southern part of the State. Cli- 
mate and roads are O. a. in the South, writes Mr, 




The Best 
1 Transmission 



Most autotn 

troubles nristf in 
the transmission 

disc. T'.ie transmission of the Cadillac has solved 

one of the most difficult problems of the automobile. 

It insures perfect running, reduces cost of 

maintenance and repairs and gives 

greater power. It is simple, 

strong and noiseless. 

Iiverv part 

of the 




is built 
with care, thor- 
oughness, and precision. 
The result is extreme durability 
and absence of annoyance to the operator. 
The speed range of the Cadillac is from four to 
thirty miles an hour, the maximum speed being 
easily maintained with four passengers. Let us send 
you booklet A E and give you the name of the near- 
est Cadillac agency where you can satisfy yourself 
that uothingat double the money equals the Cadillac. 
Prices, $750 to $900. 



CADILLAC 

AUTOMOBILE 

COMPANY, 

Detroit, Mich. 

Member Association 
Licensed Automobile 
Manufacturers . 



Model B 
*ttOO 




Pierce Arrobv 1905 



The Suburban, body by Quinby, 28-32 h. p. 

The Landaulet. '* '.'•'- 

The Opera Coach, " - 

The Great Arrow, side entrance, aluminum tonneau, 28-! 



h. p. 



, 15.20 
$6,200 
$6,200 

$4,150 



The Arrow, side entrance, aluminum tonneau 24-28 h. p. $3,660 

These are all four cylinder direct driven machines. The un- 
usual success attended these cars in' 1904 is convincing that the 
Pierce Arrow solution of the problem of successful motor car 
building: is the right one. This success was recognized by the St. 
i.ouis Exposii ion, which awarded the Pierce line the Qrantf Prize 

MOBILE CA'R'RI AGE CO. 

Golden Gate A*)e. and Gough St. S.F. 



&/>e CADILLAC 




Cadillac won 10 Trophies 
at tbe Del Monte meet. 

Price $950 
With Tonneau $1050 

Canopy top extra 
August 10. 1904 Cadil- 
lac officially first to 
finish in ' the New 
York and St. Louis 
run. Roads nearly 
impassable. 

CUYLER LEE, Agt. 

359-363 GOLDEN uATE 
AVE., S. P. 



& AUTOMOBILE SPECIALTIES j& 

Geo. P. Moore C&. Co. 
323 VAN NESS AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



30 



Blaney, and the auto has so far given no trouble. Mr. 
Blaney last month successfully covered 585 miles on 
the run from San Francisco to Los Angeles. 

* * * 

The new side-entrance Pope-Toledo will be on ex- 
hibition at the Pope-Toledo Touring Car Company's 
garage, 134-138 Golden Gate avenue, on January 
10th, having passed Albuquerque on January 3d. 

* * * 

W. H. Hooper, a prominent lumberman of this 
city, intends to do quite a bit of motoring this sea- 
son, and has ordered a four-cylinder Autocar. The 
arrival of this new motor car is being awaited with 
much interest. 

* * * 

J. Durnham, of Watsonville, is among the visiting 
automobile men in San Francisco the past week. Ac- 
companied by his family, lie had a most enjoyabie run 
111 his Autocar to this city, and has been daily taking 
short trips 111 the vicinity of the metropolis. 

* * * 

The first Oldsmobile light delivery wagon on the 
coast is being used by the Fresno Evening Democrat 
in the delivery of their newspapers, and they are 
much pleased with its work so far. 

* * * 

The Pope Motor Car Co. guarantees its 1905 30-38 
horse-power side entrance car to carry five people 
on the road at a "mile a minute" speed. This is 
the greatest speed guaranteed by any manufacturers 
tor a regular stock touring car in America or in 
Furope. 

* * * 
A year or so ago, when Colonel Albert A Pope 
undertook the personal management of the old In- 
ternational Motor Car Company, and re-christened it 
the Pope Manufacturing Co., it was accepted as a 
icregone conclusion that the world would hear from 
the veteran before long. Expectation in this case 
has been fully verified in the entry of a Pope-Toledo 
racing car as the first candidate for a place on next 
year s Gordon Bennett team. The Colonel's exam- 
ple should prove contagious, and at least a dozen 
cars should be listed before the date for closing en- 
tries. The eliminating trials under such circum- 
stances should be an event second in sporting inter- 
est only to the Vanderb.lt Cup or the Florida Carni- 
val Europe expects an American team next year 

res ,lt And F ' ^ T S ,°, methi "g ° f * %"re in the 
result. And Europe should not be disappointed. 

Card and Loose Leaf Systems. 

$2.00 buys a card index drawer, 500 record cards 

a phabefcal index and guide cards 5 Shaw-Walker 

Set? ST" 1 ' l° fi OSe " !ea ! l6dgers ' P rice h °° k * and com- 

fn* s? a Hn°l ,tfit V ndUding printin S and bookbind- 

4tM S at-et°" r r e y et DePartment " SMb ° rn ' Vail & C °- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 



The 1905 



Your shopping list for the Holidays will not be 
complete without OLD KIRK whisky It "s the 
ptaS°A p et H't T 1 T k ? a P-sent %£ 
s P t I ree S rSa„ A FrrncSc o tal,ng & ^ «H37 Jackson 

FrT^o! delTsTn a^i'ffif ^ n r e e ^»" Ca.lforn.a street, San 
^UMEylSSS^Sn*. ™'™ d and Dust 




Side Entrance 16 Horse Power Double Cylinder Touring;Car 

Has Arrived 

Call and see it. 

Rambler Automobile Agency. '"J,** «*J st. 

Phone South 1007 



BEFORE PURCHASING 1905 MODEL AUTOMOBILE SEE THE 

PUNGS= 
FINCH 

4 Cylinder $1,800 
Touring Car 

B. B. STANLEY. Agt. 

Salts Rooms— 596 GOLDEN 
GATE AVE., S F. 




THE EXPERIENCED BUYER AND THE EXPERI- 
ENCED OPERATOR BOTH SAY, "GIVE ME THE 

AUTOCAR" 



The four-passenger car and the runabout have made 
AUTOCAR REPUTATION. Each stands at the head 
of its class for value and efficiency. The 16-20 
h. p. four cylinder, double side entrance AUTOCAR which 
will sell for $2150 is the most simple, reliable and efficient 
four cylinder automobile produced in America. 



WEST COAST MOTOR-CAR CO. 

606 V„ Ness Ave., S. F. 1 16- 1 18 E. Third St., Los Angeles 




t T wrmT,de I l^lfar h ri™jan P i o Pe o T » r leda A demonstrating car of 
on road, a mile a minute Oar guaranteed to carry 6 people 

POPE TOLEDO TOURING CAR CO. 

G. A. BOYER, Manager 

U«« fiOLDEN GATE AVE., S. F. PHONE SOUTH 1142 



J.inu.i 



IO05. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



3» 




j^L^rvto 



urance 



fiSfibM. 




The rumor ol the Washington Life Insurance 
Company's re-insurance is authoritatively denied in 
a letter to the News Letter from President Brewer. 

"Thinking that you mav have seen the rumors re- 
■ lii- company, lately published in scmie of 
the newspapers, to the effect that we were about to 
re-insure our policies in or become absorbed by some 
other company, etc.. and that you should be advised 
the truth of these rumors, we write you this 
letter. 

"We deeply regret the publication of these ru- 
mors. They are not true, and are very distressing, 
but we hope our good record of 44 vears will prevent 
our being injured by them. Others among the largest 
life insurance companies have at times in the past 
been subjected to kindred rumors. 

'l'be Xew York State Insurance Department is 
now making its customary periodical examination of 
this and other life insurance companies of tin's State. 
The Department's examination is not yet completed. 
When it is, the result will be published, and we will 
send the statement to you for your information. 

"We have no intention of being re-insured in or 
absorbed by any other company, or of retiring from 
business, or anything of the sort. There is no reason 
why we should. Our assets are larger than they ever 
were, and our investments are of the best character. 
They will compare favorably with those of any of 
the large life insurance companies. Our business 
this year has been larger than in any previous year. 
The company is amply able to and will take the best 
of care of its policy-holders. 

Mr. David Parks Frackler, one of the most emi- 
nent Xew York actuaries, has lately made a com- 
plete examination of this company, and furnished us 
his written statment, which shows that the company 
is in sound and stable condition in every way." 

The field and omce force of George H. Tyson, 
1 leneral Agent, celebrated his twenty-fifth anniver- 
sary in the insurance business by presenting him 
with a very handsome silver and cut glass pitcher and 
glasses and silver mounted tray as a Christmas 
greeting and remembrance of his twenty-fifth anni- 
versary in the insurance business, many of the em- 
ployees having been connected with him during the 
greater part of his insurance career. 
* * * 

Insurance Commissioner Wolf has issued the fol- 
lowing notice to the companies as to "filing dates 
and penalties" : 

"Attention is again called to the fact that the dates 
for filing statements are fixed by law as hereinafter 
set out. See Section 611, Political Code. 

"Penalties for neglect to file statements are like- 
wise fixed by law at $100 for the first month's delay 
and $200 for each succeeding month or fractional 
part of a month. 

"The Commissioner has no discretion in this mat- 
ter. He 'must collect.' See Section 617 Political 
Code. 

"Statements of California business must be verified 
by the oath of the State Manager, and must be filed 
on or before January 15th, in each year, 



"Annual statement of California companies must 

be tiled on ■ >r before February l-t. of each year. 

"Annual statement of companies of othei 

must be tiled on or before -March loth. 111 each 

"Annual statement of companies of foreign coun- 
tries must be tile. I on or before Ma\ 1st. in each 

"Life companies may use convention blank for 
annual statement." 

* * • 

In the meantime, the News Letter desires to call 
the Insurance Commissioner's attention t.i page 25 

of the Examiner of January 1st. and ask him what he 
is gi ling to do about it. 

* * * 

The news that Robert Dickson is to leave the 
Royal Exchange comes as a surprise to his many 
friends on the coast. The Exchange, if it lose Mr. 
Dickson's services, will find it hard to replace him. 
Robert Dickson has been connected with the Royal 
Exchange since 1891, when he was appointed Pacific 
Coast manager of the company. In 1898 he was pro- 
moted to the position of LInited States manager, 
when the company entered nearly all of the princi- 
pal States, at the same time moving its United States 
headquarters to New York City. The rumors on the 
street that Mr. Frank Dickson would lose the com- 
pany on account of this change are regarded as un- 
founded. The department, under his management, 
has made money for the Royal Exchange, and there 
is no reason to expect any change. 

* * * 

Mr. Robert Dickson, it is understood, in event of 
his leaving the Royal Exchange, will enter the local 
business in New York. 



Jane Woodworth Bruner has sold her new play, 
"The Mad world," and it will soon be put on in stock 
in San Francisco. Mrs. Bruner will be remembered 
as the author of a sensational article which appeared 
in the Overland Monthly for the month of October: 
an attack on the Russian Siberian Government, 
called "The Czar's Commissionaires." 



There is no residence section in such great demand 
at the present time as the Piedmont district. People 
generally are making changes as spring approaches, 
and they are purchasing building tracts in the cities 
across the bay. Piedmont and Oakland are sure to 
enjoy an unusual and healthy advance in realty val- 
ues the coming year. 




PIERCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO., Inc. 

STORAGE, MOVING. PACKING and SHIPPING 

WAPEHOUSE, EDDY ST., near Fillmore 

Separate built room> for the Storage of Household Furniture 

Office: Post and Powell Sts. Phone Private 571. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 




Library&able 



ss— 




"The Buccaneers: A btory of the Black Flag in 
Business," is a novel by Henry M. Hyde, giving with 
startling candor and realism, a picture of modern cor- 
poration methods of the "frenzied" type in dealing 
with rivals in business. Two great concerns clash; 
wit is sharpened against wit, schemes and plottings 
are met with tricks and counter-plots; a love story 
winds its troublous way through the clashing and 
twisting interests of the rivals; the relation of fam- 
ily ties to "business" is shown relentlessly. It is a 
keenlv interesting story. 

Funk & Wagnalls Co., New York. 



"The Business Career in its Public Relations," 
by Albert Shaw, Ph. D., is an able address, terse and 
epigramatic, and imbued with practical ideals for 
business life, will have a wide influence beyond the 
educational circles for which it was originally in- 
tended. 

Paul Elder & Co., Publishers, San Francisco. 



"Amy Dora's Amusing Day" is by Frank M. Bick- 
nell, announced as good entertaining for "those who 
like that sort of thing." We are quite sure that you 
won't. 

Henry Altemus Co., Publishers, Philadelphia. 

"Stealthy Steve" — A Foolish Series — published by 
John W. Luce & Co., Boston. A reprint from Bos- 
ton Post. 



Do You Want a Trunk 

at a moderate price? One that looks good and is 
good ; or a dress-suit case, valise or traveling set? We 
have them all in the best material and lowest prices. 
Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 



RIGGS HOUSE 

Opp. TJ. S. Treasury, one block from the White House- 
Washington D. C. The Hotel "Par Excellence" of the 
National Capital. 
First-class in all appointments. O. G. Staples, 
Prop. American Plan, $3 per day and upwards.* 



THE COLONIAL 

S. E. cor. Pine and Jones Sts. 
The Select Hotel of San Francisco 



All apartments steam heated 



Rest a Few Days 

A great many San Francisco people spend daye and weeks during 
the fall and winter at Hotel Del Monte. No other resort in Cali- 
fornia offers such a combination of attractions—sea bathing, golf, 
■.utomobiling. bowling, tennis. Ashing and all out-of-door sports. 
Instead of going from place to place seeking comforts, the wise 
who enjoy out-of-doorlife arrange to put in many enjoyable weeks 
down at Del Monte by the sea. Address Geo P. Snell. manager. 
Del Monte, California- 

At Hotel Del Monte 



San Marco Hotel 



536 Taylor Street. 

bet. Geary and Post Sts. 

A new modern flre-proof family and tourist hotel. 52 sunny 
suites with private bath rooms, 44 single rooms with public bath- 
room on each floor. Electric lights, steam heat and telephone in 
every room. Only white help employed. In its furnishings and 
table the San Marco will compare favorably with any select 
family hotel. GEO. J. CASANOVA, Manager. 



1012-16 VAN NESS AVENUE 

HOTEL 



Opp. St. Mary's Cathedral 

'RICHELIBX/ 



The finest private family hotel on the coast. Elegantly furnished 
f ront suites on the avenue. Every r^ 5m steam -heated. Reception, 
smoking and private dining rooms. Concessions made to large 
families by the year. Correspondence solicited. And 



HOTEL GRANADA 

(Fireproof Building) 



N.W. 



Sutter and Hyde Streets 

Hotel Richelieu Co. 



For Those Who Appreciate Comfort and Attention 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 

SAN FRANCISCO 
American and European Plan. A Quiet Home 
Centrally Looated. George Warren Hooper, Less e 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST.. near Tremont, BOSTON 

Harvey 3 Woods, Props. 



WM.SCHRQCDt 



TELEPHONE 

MAIN 668. 




GOLD MEDAL 

California Midwinter International 

Exposition 1894 



mjjftt GRAM' SILVER MEDAL 

^^ World's Exposition, Paris, 1900 



^.\i 



j €mbossina. Staining, Beveling €tc 

Office 120 Second St. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



HIGHEST AWARDS 
Wherever Exhibited 



January 7. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

My Lady of the Whip 



By Lady Algy. 

Now il:.u tl>. son is on, the choo-choo of 

the automobile no longer sounds like the funeral 
dirge of t! ["hose who feared that the grow- 

bubbling spelled disaster for polo, 
find their fears were groundless. A smarter and more 
enthusiastic crowd never gathered than at the open- 
ing meet at the private track of Charlie Clark. The 
women who went doVvn tor the racing wore frocks 
that were the last word on gowning. Mrs. Rudolph 
Spreckcls had her sister. Virginia Joliffe, and Ethel 
I lean with her, and a stunning trio they made. The 
Clarks. the Clem Tobins and the Magees formed 
an attractive group, and the Hopkins-Taylor-McNear 
clan splashed the perspective with a hit of color. Mrs. 
l-'rank Carolan. Xew Yorkly correct, had Mrs. Paul 
Gagstone with her. and Mrs. Cardan's enthusiasm 
bubbled over whenever the blue and while colors of 
the Carolan stables fluttered victoriously.- Mrs. 
Spreckcls showed the same jubilant interest in the 
whining ponies entered by her husband. 

This abundant enthusiasm in polo promises that 
the coaching season will see some lady whips in the 
field. It is a sport that has been neglected hitherto 
by California women, only a few having achieved the 
distinction of first rank wdiips. Conspicuous among 
these is Alice Hoffman, who can drive a four-in- 
hand with the skill and dexterity of a professional. 
I should not be surprised if Mrs. Carolan took to the 
whip this season, for her interest in horseflesh has 
not been dimmed by bubbling, and she has just 
come from Xew York, where she was entertained by 
the hunting set, among whom are such famous whips 
as Miss Eleanor Jay, Miss Bryce, Mrs. J. Ledyard' 
Blair, Miss Angelica Gerry and several others. In 
England and France, women whips are recognized 
as being just as clever and nervy as their male rivals. 

Morris E. Howlett, a four-in-hand genius, who is 
the most famous whip of Paris, and who has taught 
many beautiful American women the mysteries of 
the art, expects to be in California this year, which 
fact alone will give an impetus to coaching. I re- 
member attending a lecture Howlett gave once, at 
wdiich a throng of fashionables sat in rapt attention, 
and when the wizard of the coach had finished, I felt 
that coaching was one of the fine arts. Howlett de- 
clared that a splendidly poised woman driving the 
six-in-hand was the finest sight in the world. I have 
my eyes on a verbatim report of the lecture, which 
will be interesting to every lover of the sport who 
holds that women do not make good whips. "Some 
have doubted the advisability," said Howlett, "of 
ladies driving a coach believing that the average 
woman would be unable to hold a four with sufficient 
strength. There may be some truth in this, if the 
horses are unsuitable or badly bitted. But with the 
proper animals, carefully bitted, there is no reason 
why coaching should not be a pleasurable pastime 
for the most fastidious women. 

"Fathers, brothers and friends of young ladies 
wishing to drive should not expect too much of them 
when they take the reins to give maiden exhibitions 
of their skill. The lady should always have a fair 
chance and not be discouraged by hasty criticism or 
unnecessary advice. In teaching a lady never argue 
nor say 'The horses are not pulling — see, I can hold 
them with one finger !' It you are instructing a lady, 
encourage, rather than discourage her. One has onlv 
to be present at the ladies' coaching parade in New 
York to realize how popular this form pf sport has 



33 
become among the fair sc\. The dexterity and skill 
displayed bj some coachwomen in handling their 
teams would put man) a man to shame. 

"It has been full\ demonstrated that women are 
abundantly aide to manage and drive a four-in-hand. 

This form of sport will continue to flourish and in- 
crease the number of recruits. Driving 1^ loo 
ous an art to admit of frills, and society ladies who 

join the coaching army put aside mannerisms ami 

seriously master every detail of the glorious art. 

"If I were asked for advice, 1 would say, keep a 
level head and steady nerve. A lack of these means 
failure to become an expert eoaehwoman. One must 
l>e thoroughly taught by an expert to acquire a plain. 
easy, masterful manner, and to avoid the flippant 
handling of the reins that endangers life as well as 
reputation for horsemanship." 

Why shouldn't we have a ladies' coaching parade 
lure"' There are plenty of society women with 
"horse sense" enough to become expert whips. I 
am sure somebody will start the wheels moving. 

Pretty much all those who "swore off" on the first 
day of the New Year are ready to swear that they 
made a mistake, and will immediately undertake to 
make up for lost time. 




HIE EVOLUTION 

OF A 

Good Cook 



From NO beef extract 
to ANY beef extract 
then to the ONE. 
beef extract — 

LIEBIG 

COMPANY'S 
EXTRACTofBEEF 

With Blue Signature 
TOR FORTlf YEARS THE FIRST 



» 



1 



Ruinart 




The champagne 
of perfection. 
Essential to the 
enjoyment oP 
any function 

HJI/BERT 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTlS 

VWGaakill-Special-Ad? 
San Francisco 




34 SAN FRANCISCO 

Automobile Club WorR 

By L, P. Lowe 



NEWS LETTER. 



It is more than likely that ninety per cent of the 

Ktabrf ™r? °< lhC existence °* t," Auc- 
tion de^r 1 H ? T'Y 11 '^ h ^ a SOcial organiza- 
snnrt ,L f ° d " eIo Pnient of automobilinl as a 
sport and pleasurable pastime, and indeed, it is not 

he att"r derC,i "n"' SUCh be the Case > as > When pSb 
ectu n w 'h" f Ued f t0 thc club h '» dually in con- 
meet tZ " e / unctl °" as a run, tour or raee 
meet. The mam objects of the club arc however 

e^of'cin ° S in ;' CCd ' a " d whiIe the PleasurabTe 
n fart 1 7 work are not lost sight of, and are 

mak in? ,h Very , T* n°, the f ° re ' k is with «« Wea 
01 making the club well known and thought of as 

ours, runs and rate meets offer a means of attracting 

the first attention of those who might not heS 

hear of it, and ultimately know enough of its serious 

problems to become interested therein 

nafure^L^nfTf theringS '" -'' SOcial and Pleasurable 
nature also offer a means of contact and easv com 

mumcat.on and always result in SUbstanlL additions 

to the membership roll, and while they entail a «*»? 

amount of work, especially the race meets Lsf tin 

unVe V r; th , e dl ' l> ; and burdens fa » undertake them 

nhes ltatlng i y and willingly, and feel their reward 

m the conviction of work well done towards the 
peat and good ultimate objects of good roads and 

b H t Wfor'tr a 'r ,e f ° r the be -nt of a a utomo d 
Dinsts, but for the entire community, for what ran 
be a greater public convenience and even bteSE ap 
predated and participated in by all classes, than^d 

It may therefore be stated that the development of 

mo^aToi S5E is the prime obj - f " f ^Sto- 

™fa ran 1 in f 1 ma ' C -° UpIed with the a.Jopti-.n 

us by afl ' T„ T f,T er \ mg t,,eir ^tenance and 
tours runs £S ? * the P leasurab '^ feature of 
tours, runs, and clean, sportsmanlike contests arP 

sa d id° C done S t'V "' ?"** whicTmuch 

saiu aonc and learned, experiences pvrliamr.^ 

gestions received and given, way^nT "Sou^I 
of educating and accustoming the "cnonl nil t 
the use of the horseless vehicle, the reh ti£ n eri ' 

discus e sTd er and° S "^ ^ ^eTo^aE 

scusscd, and the thousand and one other subierts 
u hich^arise, and all in a spirit of good wS^S 

Already there are several thousand automobiles in 

mobile the ereat factor Ir, t g ■ , the auto " 

thereof, and who f , H v e L fv, rap,d develo Pment 
action and prestige whTch can corn^ 6 f T* ° ( 
earnest association work ™ C ° n,y thron * h 

Good roads will come a t , „„... i 
when the public demands are sufficS ^"^^ 

wholesale, but, be the method asTt ™ P, e done 
pHshment will be quicker ^ and better b'v t7 ^T] 
efforts of hundreds working through J •^ Un 't ed 
organization on well define! Z^LT b^T 



January 7 , I905 . 

^TWalueTnd ° f th ° USandS gr °P in S ^dually. 
±ne value, and even necessity of club work is most 
apparent in connection with the making of just laws 
governing highwaj traffic, and the undoing of unulst 
ami vicious ones. Happily, the automobile has Ue 
preceded by the bicycle and the electric car the ad 

IlliSIIIf 

d l,n a,r - of some of their constituents, offers an 
indeed calls for. earnest club wort- u/i , 

misconception is found the 77,1 of ° "''■' 

Pleasantly undertaken buv.urt hatefuToS' " 
and vicious bigoted oppo^^^^^ 

hfn'itiSt ° r ° tlierW, ' Se may be Pessary and 
fuUssue the contest from which the indTviduaTgstTy 

denve a . n f !-" Sta r, Ce ° f thC be " ent and l' llbli C good to be 

■nay serve better than'extended w " 

Have not the residents of all cities watched the 

;; nhng streams of teams slowly making "their ^ 

through the busy streets, accomplishing but little 

or themselves and greatly impeding other rffic? 

bne^enTisTt 11 horSe " drive ° **&• ™^- 

now done by horse-drawn teams ' S 

Again, the powerful automobile will handle at I P «t 
twice as much of a load as will the horses so tha 
space, speed and load considered" at feast Zrdvl 

Siir fs of i,ors " m n "™» ™ui 7 u™ ofih. 

To^llitfarnier the .nlomoWe offer. „„ I... a boo,, 



BOOTHS DRY GIN 



FOR 

COCHTAILS, 
FIZZES 

and 
RICHEYS 
lilbert Mercantile Co 

Solo Agents for P.ciflo Co.st 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Commands :he 
highest price In 
London and Is 
recognized a. s 
the Best Dry 
Gin the world 
over. 



January 7. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IS 



\cr perfect highways, he will safely "auto" his 
'•> market or point of shipment at an aver- 
age »] from fifteen to twenty miles per hour, 
■. unthought of distances, anil 
all at much less cost than can be done with team--. 

When it is considered that five > ears ago there were 
practically no automobiles, and that during th( 
twelve months the automobile output exceeded in 
value all of the locomotive- built in America by $20,- 
000.000, notwithstanding the fact that the industry is 
hardly fairly begun, it does not take an over Optomis- 
tic not duly unimaginative mind to see in the automo- 
bile the emancipator of the horse. 

Hut what, do you say. has automobile club work 
to do with this? Everything. The automobile is, 
to-day, principally a pleasure vehicle, but in process 
of commercial development, calling for good roads, 
fair and enlightened laws and public favor. It is, 
as yet. too expensive in both first cost and subsequent 
operation to be adopted by the many, and consequent- 
ly the favored few are the present users, but the gen- 
eral public should not lose sight of the fact that it 
is the thousands, aye, millions of dollars spent an- 
nually by the present automobile users, principally 
for pleasure vehicles, which enable and permit the 
development of the industry, and which will, in time, 
and indeed within a very short time, place the auto- 
' mobile within the reasonable reach of any one who 
now owns a team. 

Unfortunately, the public cannot as a whole be 
depended upon to take this broad-minded and liberal 
view. Many individuals freely admit its truthful- 
ness, and eagerly anticipate the coming good. Some 
are passive, and do not much care one way or the 
other, but there are also those who hold a pebble so 
close to the eye as to exclude the glorious light of 



nn beyond; those who hinder every form of 
lightened advancement; those who think that what 
was good enough for their grandfather 
enough for them; those who, because of their cal 
fear they may be, in some way. interfered with 
through changed conditions; those who, having .1 

fractious horse, would rather spend live precious 

years and many hard-earned dollars in fighting the 

automobile than live minutes in educating and •'! 

toining the horse to it; those who. on general prin- 
ciples, antagonize and object to anything which they 
do not themselves enjoy, and the many others, "those 
whose efforts at hindrance, generally hidden, can 
be met with organized action." 

In time, commercially considered, automobile 
clubs will be as useless as would horse and wagon 
clubs now, although as touring and social clubs 
they may always remain, but in the clays of infancy, 
when fair treatment is needed and popularity is im- 
perative, club and association work is essential, and 
in this connection there can be doubly applied to nu- 
merical strength and financial ability that old Scotch 
adage: 

"Many a mickle makes a muckle." 

Draperies, portieres, and the many other fabrics 
used in the home, may be obtained from Geo. T. 
Marsh & Co., 214 Post street. 

John W. Carmany, Chronicle Building, makes 
shirts to order. They are the best to be had for the 
money. 



Testa Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only $7.50 

per ton; half ton 14; quarter ton |2. Full weight guaranteed. In 
economy, cleanliness and heat producing qualities, Briquettes 
are superior to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th 
and Channel. Phone South 95. 



Perfected Dunlop Detachable Tire 



Solves the problem of 
proper cost for tire 
maintenance. Made of 
the best rubber by the 
most expert workmen. 
No rim cutting. No 
creeping. No pinching 
of tubes. Punctures 
easily and quickly re- 
paired. 



h 





It can be detached by 
a novice in less time 
than any other tire. Ex- 
pand the ring by means 
of the turnbuckle, re- 
move ring and slip 
outer cover from rim. 

SIMPLE. 
EASY. 

QUICK. 



Tirade mask 
The Hartford Rubber WorRs Company, Hartford, conn. 



Boston New York Philadelphia Buffalo 

Detroit Minneapolis San Francisco 



Cleveland Chicago Denver 

St. Louis Los Angeles 



36 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. January 7, 1905. 

Anecdotes from Washington 



sl good 

for a 

dollar.d a half 



Centemeri 

109 Grant Ave.BttGearySPostSts. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT S TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

^-PAPE'R — «* 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Blake, McPall & Co., Portland Oregon. 
TEL. MAIN 199. 55-57-59-61- FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses 
R*-iicllac» laundries ' paper-hangers, printers, painters 
OrUSIICJnilliard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy- 
makers, canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 

Buchanan Brothers 
Brush Mfts., 609 Sacramento St., S. F., Tel. Main 5611 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and commission merchants. 
General agent. 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

Gillinghara Cement 

MarKet Street, cor. Fremont 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

va Post street, between Powell and Mason 
San Francisco. Tel. Main 1323. 

E. BRIDGE. Proprietor. 




Bon Marche Clothing Renovatory 

SVITS CLEANED and PRESSED $1.00 

Suits called for and delivered free. Repairing and 
alterations. Work guaranteed- 

Office: 410 Hearst Building. Telephone Drumm 44 



A REWARD OF $1,000 

will be paid for a case of 

WRINKLES. FRECKLES, BIRTH MARKS, 
HOLES. MOTH PATCHES, SMALLPOX PIT- 
TIN0S, PIMPLES, TAN, SUNBURN, ACNE. 
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR, PORT WINE MARKS 

and all Facial Blemishes that I 
accept for treatment and fail to 
cure : : : ; 

YOU CAN BE BEAUTIFUL 

DR. W. C. SCHLEY. Dermatologist 

School. 141 Powell St. S. F. Store. 229 P. well Sl: 




From Washington Life. 
The Only One. 

John Sharp Williams is one of the wittiest men in 
Congress, and usually more than holds his own at 
repartee, but the following anecdote indicates that 
the famous Mississippian now and then catches a 
Tartar. One day when he was speaking in Missis- 
sippi a man in the audience cried, "I've been robbed 
by pickpockets !" 

"I did not suspect there were any Republicans 
present," said Mr. Williams, amid great laughter. 

"There ain't !" cried the victim ; "I'm the only one." 



Familiarity. 

Regular army officers say that volunteers are a 
trifle deficient in matters of military etiquette. A 
story is told of a volunteer captain who started in by 
calling General .Miles plain "Miles," whereat the 
General sardonically remarked: "Don't call me 
'.Miles'; it's too formal. Call me 'Nelse.' " 

Major-General Henry Clark Corbin, who is now in 
the Philippines, tells an amusing story of a young 
lieutenant of militia who accompanied his fellow 
volunteers to the war game at Manassas recently. 

It appears, says Collier's Weekly, that the young 
volunteer officer in question was conversing with 
certain regular army officers near General Corbin's 
tent when General Grant and his staff passed. The 
regular officers arose and saluted, but the volunteer 
lieutenant sat still. 

"That was General Grant," said one of the regulars 
to the lieutenant. "Why didn't you salute him?" 

"Oh," responded the volunteer, nonchalantly, "I've 
only been here a few days, and we haven't been in- 
troduced." 



North and South. 

Air. Foster M. Yoorhees, former Governor of New 
Jersey, tells this story on a distinguished Virginian. 

The son of the Old Dominion had been out with 
the boys. As he softly opened the hall door the me- 
lodious voice of his better half greeted him with this 
query : 

"What time is it?" 

"It is early, my dear," responded the Virginian. 

"How can you say so," exclaimed his spouse, 
"when the clock has just struck two?" 

"All right," said the Virginian, his voice indicating 
virtuous indignation ; "all right. If you choose to 

take the word of a d d Yankee clock against that 

of a Virginia gentleman, you may do so; but I have 
my opinion of you !" 



Whistler's Tastes. 

Whistler was not a frequenter of the theatre, yet 
there were occasions in which he enjoyed the relaxa- 
tion of an evening with Menpes, or with a party of 
friends, in the stalls, says the New York Times. He 
was, however, not a very pleasant companion, for he 
never could take the stage seriously, even though 
the play were the most sublime of tragedies. "I 
shall never forget going one night with Whistler and 
Godwin, the artist, to see Wilson Barrett as Clau- 
dian," says his chronicler. "Whistler screamed and 
laughed and rocked himself to and fro in an agony of 
merriment. Godwin was a very brilliant man, and a 
serious sort of fellow, but he couldn't look at the 
stage, the actors or anything else, for watching 
Whistler. I thought he would have a fit." Shakes- 
peare's plays always struck WhistJler's humorous 



January 7, 1905. 

fancy, ami yet • re enthusiastic than 

• irae of the most trivial phrases ol modern 
art. He admired Nellie Farren, and woul 
claim: "Amazing I Marvelous!" every time the cur- 
tain fell upon a scene in which she Wa3 ;i 1 

Cora it the music halls and pantomimes 

amused him just as if he were a child. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



37 



Defined. 

Persons who nse the telephone "fun ha\e diffi- 
culties in making themselves understood. It is said 
of our Secretary of State that his ability to get at 
the hasis of any situation never fails him, and the fol- 
lowing, though "illy a trivial matter, is .111 illustra- 
tion. The Story is told that he called up another 
official here in Washington, who wanted t" know 
the name of his interrogator. 

"Mr. Hay." was given as the answer to the frequent 
telephone question: "Who is there?" 

But Mr. Hay was requested to repeat his name, and 
his interlocutor failing to catch it, again and again 
shouted rather impatiently. "Speak up; I cannot hear 
you." 

"Mr. Hav. Mr. Hay." 

"Mr. What?" 

"Mr. Hay-h-a-y, hay, dried grass — Secretary Hay. 
Do you hear me now ?" 

And he said he did. 



Compliments. 

Sir Henry Irving cherishes the memory of two 
compliments that were paid him, saying they gave 
him more pleasure than all the other pleasant things 
said to him. 

One evening he was hurrying out of the theatre at 
the close of a performance, when he heard a nice- 
looking old lady say : 

"What a shame that he is an actor and sold to the 
devil ! He would have made a fine preacher." 

Another tribute paid to his genius was that of a 
London newsboy, who insisted on sending him the 
Times free for a week because he thought Sir Henry's 
Shylock was a perfect imitation of a business rival 
whom he hated. 

Retort Courteous. 

Henry James, the novelist, who is now gathering 
impressions of his native land after an absence of 
twenty years in England, was recently discussing 
American writers with a literary acquaintance in 
New York, when he took occasion to bestow warm 
praise upon the work of a certain American author 
of the younger school. 

"But," interrupted his vis-a-vis, "the man you are 
admiring is, by the way, one of your severest critics." 

"Perhaps," mused the distinguished novelist, "per- 
haps we are both mistaken." 



Sweet Slang. 

By far too many of our daughters have a vocabu- 
lary so up-to-date as to be ahead of the dictionary. 
One of the season's buds was asked if she didn't 
think Miss Elizabeth Glover and the Netherlands 
Minister made a fine couple. She responded with en- 
thusiasm : 

"You bet, they're the sweetest couple that ever 
breathed. The Jonkheers a perfect lamb, and Bessie 
Glover's a bully girl." 

George T. Marsh & Co., 214 Post street, has on 
exhibition a complete assortment of Japanese art 
goods. 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 



Comer 

California and Montgomery 

Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



UNUL »mi SI ■ 
TOTAl ASSFTS 



ti.ill.lrt.H 
MU.7M.fti 



num. 
[otemri paid oil wivlm: 

annum. 

Trusts ezc rate i We nre 

auti. 1 the 

guardian "f estate* and the 
axeoutorot wills. 

Bate deposit boxen ranted at 
H> per annum ami apWttdfr 

Oct a box ;it onoe and guard 
against loss by Fire or Burg- 
lars. 

J. DaHzell Brown 

Ma.rva.gor 



Cytos 



For Antiseptic Purposes, 
Month Wash, Poison OaK, 
Catarrhal Troubles, Pre- 
serving the Teeth. 

ALL DRUGGISTS 



SANTIAGO ARRILLAGA 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Tuesdays and Fridays at Studio 

308 POST STREET, Byron Mauzy Piano Warerooms 

Wednesdays at Residence 

5734 TELEGR.APH AVE.. OAKLAND 



REMOVAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

ELEANOR CONNELL teacher of singing 

announces that she has moved to the Mutual Savings Bank Build- 
ing, at Geary. Kearny and Market streets, where she can be seen 
every afternoon except "Wednesdays. Studios 1201-2. 

TONE PRODUCTION, REPERTOIRE. FINISH. 

Studio for rent "Wednesdays 



PRIVATE BOARDING SCHOOL AND 
KINDERGARTEN, 

No. 2514 Pine St., near Pierce. 
'Phone Steiner 3171. 

DANCING, FRENCH, DELSARTE. 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 

Lessons in Painting, Drawing, Sketching and illus- 
trating. Life classes, $3.00 per month. 

937 HAHHET STREET 



PRESS CLIPPINGS 

GET THE HABIT 

of using our Press Clippings in whatever diversion you may be 
interested and you will marvel at the results. The ' Argus'' has 
many eyes, you only two. so let us do the work for you. Send 
five dollars for a final order with your desired instructions. We 
will do the rest and benefit you in many ways. 



Argus Press Clipping Bureau 

Otto Spengler, Director 



352 Third Ave. 



New York City 



MR. 


ALBERT 

ARCHITECT 


FARR 


REMOVED 




120 SUTTER ST. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, igos. 



IF I HAD KNOWN. 

By Beulah C. Clement in Ladies' Home Journal 

If I had known your eyes would turn away 

From smiling into mine, that I — alone — 
Should stand beside your silent form to-day, 

I should have been more tender, had I known. 
I could not hear the silent waters creep 

Close to your feet, or I (you knew it, dear?) 
Would not have said those words that made you 
weep 

Nor left unsaid the words you longed to hear. 
So many years I saw you in your place, 

I never dreamed that you could steal away— 
That I should lose the rare and gentle grace 
Of your sweet presence in my life some day. 

The word- unspoken, kindness left undone, 
These rise in tears of vain' regret to-day. ' 

I knew your worth and loved you, gentle one— 
V\ ould I had told you ere you went away! 

THE LIFE BETWEEN. 
By Louisa Fletcher Tarkiugton in Cosmopolitan 
flunk thou of this, dear heart, when I shall be 
Not with thee as to-day, my hand in thine. 
That, whereso'er I am, and thou still here, 
lhat, whatsoe'er I do, and thou not near,' 
I shall not count it heaven until thy kiss 
Shall end my waiting. Love, remember this. 
Think thou of this, my blessed, when (loci's will 
Divides us ; f shall have but gone before 
f hat His hand may from this poor clay you see 
Mold me to something worthier of thee, 
And I shall welcome fire and count it bliss 
lo purge my soul for thee! Remember this. 
Think thou of this, sweetheart, when on thy soul 
At last shall fall the shadow of thine end 
that, from the nearest borderland beyond 

bond™ 5 ° Utstretched sha11 clas P I"", and the 
Of lips and eyes shall live again nor miss 
fts olden sweetnes s. Yea, God gr ants love this. 

CHILDREN. 

By Madeline Bridees in The Smart Set 

_. The Girl-Child. 

Give her a flower to keep and hold 

A waxen doll in a silken gown 
A chain of coral with clasp of gold' 

A tiny kitten as soft as down • 
And sing, with your lips against her cheek 

Loves dear lullaby whispering, 
till sleep comes over her eyelids meek 

Sing for the girl-child— 'mother, sing! 

The Boy-Child. 

Show him the bird in its daring flight 

Th i H , t l 1C H Cl ?" d ' S br , 0W " edge - Tea&ch hil " ^ know 
1 he flag that spreads to winds' wild night— 

Sweep of the rain, and whirl of snow- 
Laugh with him, run with him, romp and leap 

Live him his will of the noisy day— ' 

but when you pause at the gate of sleep 

Oh, pray for the boy-child— mother, pray' 



For your protection remember that 
every bottle of ihe genuine 

Vve. CLICQUOT 

CHAMPAGNE 

imported direct from France bears the 
additional label 



|§|A-VIGNIER«G»- 

S,.T'V/J ■ SAM FRANCISCO- 



SOIE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC- COAST. 



This incomparable French Champagne 
is especially prepared to suit the taste 
of the American market. 

Refuse Substitutes 



LA GRANDE LAUNDRY 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE-*) Powell Street, opposite Baldwin Hotel. 

telephone Bush VI. 
BSANCHES-6A Taylor St., near Golden Gate avenue 

2S2 SPRjRffS? a»enue.oorner Kearny Street. 

209 1 lurd street rner Howard. 

njs Market street, opposite Eleventh 
LAUNDRV-Tweirth St.. bet Howard and Folsom San Francisco. 



THE REASON WHY 



So many San Francisco houses ad- 
vertise in the 



Oakland Tribune 



is because it reaches thousands of fam- 
ilies who depend entirely upon THE 
TRIBUNE for all the news of the 
day. 



THE CALL 

Has the Largest arjd Best Home Circulation 

thI h s„n?»^ R r? .fTORY SERVICE In the magazine section of 
CHATTY ARTIC-T FfThv *?£"*?■ . Th ff e are aI, ° NUMEROUC 
to 1 everybody* writers on topic, of lnter.st 

frT» e „f ICTURES given uway with the Sunday Call, absolutely 
J£% ,°' cha , r 8e are art gems, and are framed, preserved an 4 
??,'£ l I l T,?S ar . ly „ everjr art store - Ml 'his "i addition to a SUPER 
IOR NEWS SERVICE, both local and foreign. " lo * our *' l< 

Subscriptions i^ally and Sunoay, by carrier 75 cents per month 

*>>."£ & pe^'V^r 00 - 8Unday ed,t, ° n ' ' 2M P " '« "*• 




For Breakfast 
For Breakfast 
For Breakfast 



"ed Eyes and Eye- 
lids. Gran u 1 a t e d 
Eyelids and other 
±-re troubles cured 



MURINE EVE REMEDY 



January 7. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

STANFORD JOTTINGS. 

The .itricul.it 

Laura M. 
Ilir ( >nci<la Indian girl, \\! 
•in- fur herself in litcrari circle-. Her t"i r ~. l 
publii through her successful 

Ic tin Warner Indians to move pi 
aMy I in translating the 

her tribe, and lm* contributed articl< 
unique interest to many Eastern periodicals. She has 
made a study "i Iter own race problem, and is a bril- 
liant lecturer as well as a writer. It is in furtherance 
ill' her main ambition that she is about t" take a col- 
ourse, anil she has -elected Stanford fur her 
Alma Mater in preference to the Eastern universi- 
ties. In appearance Miss Cornelius — or Xeoskalita. 
91 Iter Indian title — is far more striking than the 
average Caucasian. She is tall, straight as an arrow, 
and has the piercing eyes for which her ra< 
famed. Her complexion is a pale olive, with only a 
touch of red. She represents the highest type of the 
American Indian, and as such will be an interesting 

study to the psychologists at Stanford. 

■"* * * 

A trio ot quick marriages, with former graduates 
for chief participants, have lent spice to the holiday 
festivities at Berkeley and Stanford. Amy Hamlin, 
a Berkeley graduate, who has been winning laurels 
on the professional stage, has recently taken unto 
herself a husband, in the person of the leading man 
of her "Village Postmaster" Company, now playing 
in Chicago. And following close on the heels of the 
wedding in this city of Frank Slaker, a Stanford foot- 
ball star, with an Eastern and Western reputation, 
comes the news that Frank Rodolf has eloped with 
an actress. Rodolph was a spectacular football hero 
on the Stanford team in '99, and since then has been 
more or less interested in dramatics. Mrs. Charles 
Contoit Hibbard, known to the vaudeville stage as 
Anita Allen, is the lady of his sudden choice, and, 
as her title signifies, this is her second venture of the 
kind. The two started immediately on a progressive 
honeymoon, leaving no clew for bereaved friends and 
relatives to follow. 

The famous carved tables, whose photos appeared 
in the Christmas News Letter, were carried from the 
little tavern in Mayfield on New Year's Day, and are 
now reposing in a similar haunt at Menlo Park. A 
delegation of Stanford men, followed by the entire 
student body (male portion) performed the task of 
removing the time-honored relics, and marched rank 
and file to Menlo with the trophies. Menlo is con- 
siderably farther from the Quad .than Mayfield, and 
the new tavern may perhaps fall off in patronage. 
However, just at present it is being given a rousing 
house-warming — the closing of the saloons in May- 
field has been made a gala day, and Menlo is reaping 
the benefit. 



MEWS LKTTr.P. 



Down-town merchants find the Aquarium a con- 
venient and select place where a first-class luncheon 
is served every day. 

Mothers be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow'8 Soothing Syrup" 

for your children while teething. 



Clean carpets are a great source of satisfaction. There's 

only one proper way to have them cleaned, and that's by send- 
ing them to Spauldlng's Carpet Cleaning Works, 363 Tehama 
street. They will come back looking like new, being thoroughly 
cleaned without any injury to the fabric. 




39 

HIGH 
CLASS 
WALL 
PAPERS 

AT ALL PRICES 

Interior 
Decorating 
Ideas and 
Estimates 
Furnished 

L. Tozer & 
Son Co. 

Retail salesroom 

110 GEARY ST. 

2nd Floor 

Wholesale Department 

762-764 Mission 
Street 



"BAB S" 



EPICURIAN RESTAURANT 
32 3 LA'RKI/'f STREET 



15he James H. Babcock Catering Co. 

409 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



REMOVAL NOTICE 

PATBICK k CO,, have moved to their new 
Quarters 111-U3 SANSOME STBEET. where a 
complete line of Rubber Stamps. Stencils, Seals. 
Metal Checks. Box Brands, etc. can be found. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASERS' GUIDE 

BERGEZ RESTAURANT— Rooms for ladies and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pino street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

POODLE DOG RESTAUEANT— N- E. Cor. Eddy and Mason streets. 
Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone Private Exchange 429 
A- B. Blanco. Proprietor. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 

M A E T I N ABONSOHN, Notary Public and Pension Attor- 
ney. Office, 632 Market street, room 8, (opp. Palace Hotel) San 
Francisco. Tel. Black 5541. Loans on any security at lowest 
terms ; no commissions. 

BOILER MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 814, 318, 818 Main 
street. Iron work of every description designed and constructed. 

Should use DAMIANA BIT- 
the great Mexican 
remedy. Gives health and strength - to the sexual organs. 
Send for circular. Naber, Alfs & Brune, 325 Market St.. 8. F. 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN £$££ 



—The evening at the theatre will be far more pleasant if you 
are looking forward to an hour at Zlnkand's afterwards. There 
you will enjoy the best food, wines and liquors In town. 



BILLY WESTERFELD, Prop. Phone JAMES 4711 

Mercantile Lunch, finest of American 

and German dishes served at the 

LEIDESDORFF BAR 

Now open under new management. All the best brands of 
WINES. LIQUOES and CIGABS 

Ccr. LE1DESD0RFP and 5A RAMENTO STS. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



4 o SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Cap &nd Bells Entertain 



January 7, 1905. 



Quaint and thoroughly enjoyable was the Christ- 
mas entertainment given December 29th by the 
Cap and Bells, one of the youngest, as well as one 
if the most energetic of the string of clubs that 
affords interest to thousands of women of this city. 
Mrs. William P. Buckingham is president. 

For this occasion, Sorosis Club-house, the head- 
quarters of this organization, which places merri- 
ment first, but which does not neglect the more 
serious things of life, had a holiday decoration of 
greens and grinning pumpkin faces in mysterious 
corners. 

There was not a modern number on the pro- 
gramme, which was aptly designated Ye Olde Time 
Programme, with all the small e's in their proper 
places. All the members taking part in the entertain- 
ment, as well as those receiving, wore the graceful 
frocks of their grandmother's day, but which 
are, by the turn of fashion's wheel of fortune, not 
very far from the most modish things of to-day. Old 
laces and brooches and ear-rings and bracelets were 
brought out, and proved to be most becoming. The 
ladies entered into the spirit of the occasion, living 
up to their pretty costumes. 

Mrs. S. P. Blumenberg and Miss Ena Langworthv 
played one of the old-time piano duets — a quadrille, 
bright with the tripping measures of the dance, and 
the lilting old melodies. Miss Helen Darling, in the 
costume of the Daughter of the Regiment, sang the 
well-known songs. Mrs. Charles Stewart, who 
looked exceedingly well in a low gown, sang three 
old-time songs to banjo accompaniment. 

Mrs. W. P. Buckingham, who has considerable 
histrionic ability, told with tenderness an old-time 
romance, one which took the audience from Sen- 
land to the United States in the Revolutionary times. 
In addition to this, she danced the single minuet. 
Mrs. V. C. Driffield and G. A. R. Huer, the one out- 
sider who contributed to the pleasure of the after- 
noon, gave the always welcome "Reuben and Ra- 
chel." At the conclusion of the programme, during 
a social hour, refreshments which fitted the day and 
the costume were served. There was good coffee, 
pumpkin pie, doughnuts and cookies, things seldom 
served within the precincts of a clubhouse. 



The Vienna Model Bakery, 222 Sutter street, above 
Kearny, is the best and most convenient place for 
ladies to dine while down town shopping. 

. Te fJ^, Brlf l u ettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 
for $7.50 per ton; half ton $1; quarter ton *2. Use Briquettes for 
cooking and heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



_ If vou want your old suit to look like new. send It to 

Spauldlr.B o Cleaning and Dyeing Works, 127 Stockton street 
Careful uressers always do this. Spaulding's also clean gloves 
cravats, curtains, laces and all such goods. 



Dr. Decker 



Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painlesB teeth 
extracting. 



OVR STANDARDS 



Sperrys 



Family. 



Drifted Snow. 
olden Gate Extra.. 



vSperry Flour Company 



Murphy, Grant & Co. 

Importers of staple and fancy dry goods. Manufacturers of 
furnishing good*. Patentees and sole manufacturers of 
"THE NEVER-RIP" OVERALL. The best in the world. 

Gloves, suspenders, laces, ribbons, dress goods, velvets, 
Bilk, flannels, oil cloths, cottons, linens, etc. Blankets, 
calicoes, umbrellas, cutlery, shawis. notions, smokers' 
articles, stationery, underwear, hosiery, white goods. 

Cor. Sansome and Bush Sts., S. F. 



NEWTON J. THARP 

ARCHITECT 



COMMaNDES tJ. S. NAVT 

Mr. George Mayerle— Dear Sir: The ere-glassea 
ou made for me are the most satisfactory pair I 
ave had in the last thirty years. Check In pay- 
lent Is inclosed herewith. Very respectfully 

W. W. KIMBALL, Comm'der U. sf foavy. 



131 Post Street. 



San Francisco. 



Denver & Rio firande System 

"The Scenic Line of the World." 



A 
Perfeot 
Dlnini 

Car 
Service 



Pullman and Ordinary Sleepers 
Through Without Change to 
DENVER. OMAHA. 
KANSAS CITY. 
CHICAGO. and 
ST. LOUIS. 

Personally Conducted 
Tourist Excursions 
Daily. 



Thraa 
Faat 

£xpr... 
Tr&lna 
DnJIy 



For Lowest Rates, Sleeping Car Reservation and 

Handsomely Illustrated Books of Travel. . . , 

Call ou or Address 

W. J. SHOT WELL. General Agent 

625 Market St.. Sun Franclaoa, Cal. 



$200.00 REWARD 

For the arrest nrd conviction ot any party or parlies obtalnlnr 
■looey or ialsely renrescntlni themselves as OEOBGE MAYERLE 
tie German Brpcrt Optician, or his ajeni. 




OEORGE MAYERLE'S IYE WATER 

Is a harmless and effective 
remedy ; it instantly relieves all | 
eye troubles and makes weak 
eyes strong, diseased eyes well, 
rests tired eyes. 

50c ; by mail C2c. Caution : The genuine bears the 
trade mark, an eye in a crown. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

1071 MARKET ST. Near 7th Street 




January 7, 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

STATEMENT 
Of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 



41 



-OF- 



The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

(A CORPORATION) 
AND WHERE SAID ASSETS ARE SITUATED 

DATED DECEMBER 31, 1904 

ASSETS 



1— Promissory notes and the debts thereby secured, the 

OCtoaJ value of which is $33,1 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts 
la as follows: They are all existing Contracts, 
Corporation, and are payable to it at 
Its < >tfice, which is situated at the corner of Mar- 
ket. McAllister and Jones streets, in the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of California, and 
the payment thereof 'is secured by First Mortgages 
Real Estate within this State ($33,242,210.79) and 
the States of Oregon ($236,000.00) and Washington 
0.00). Said Promissory Notes are kept and 
held by said Corporation at fts said Office, which is 
Its principal place of business, and said Notes and 
debts arc there situated. 

8— Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, 

the actual value of which is J 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts 
Is as follows: They are all existing contracts, owned 
by said Corporation, and are payable to it at its 
Office, which is situated as aforesaid, and the pay- 
ment thereof is secured by "Northern Railway 
iny of California First Mortgage 5 per cent 
Bonds," "San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley 
Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds," "Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company of Arizona 6 per cent 
Bonds," "Southern Pacific Railroad Company of 
California Series 'F and G" 6 per cent Bonds," "Los 
Angeles Pacific Railroad Company of California 5 
per cent Bonds," "Pacific Electric Railway Com- 
pany of California 5 per cent Bonds," "Park and 
Cliff House Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds," 
"Los Angeles and Pasadena Electric Railway Com- 
pany 5 per cent Bonds," "The Omnibus Cable Com- 
pany First Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds," "United 
Railroads of San Francisco 4 per cent Bonds," 
"I'nited States 3 per cent Bonds," "Pacific Gas Im- 
provement Company First Mortgage 4 per cent 
Bonds," "Spring Valley Water Works First Mort- 
gage 6 per cent Bonds," "Spring Valley Water 
Works Second Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds," "Forty- 
two shares of the Capital Stock of The Bank of Cali- 
fornia" and "One hundred and thirty shares of the 
Capital Stock of the California Street Cable Rail- 
Road Company," the market value of all said Bonds 
and Stocks being $665,525.00. Said Notes are kept 
and held by said Corporation at its said Office, and 
said Notes, Bonds and Stocks are there situated. 

3— Bonds of the United States, the actual value of i- 

which Is 15,998,436.08 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: They 
belong to said Corporation, and are kept and held by 
it in its own Vaults and are there situated. They are 



nia K per cent Bonds" 584,000.00 

9 "San Francisco and North Pacific Rail- 
way Company 5 per cent Bonds" 389,000.00 

"Southern Pacific Railroad Company of . 

California 6 per cent Bonds" 817,000.00 

"San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley 

Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" 111,000.00 

"West Shore Railroad Company of New 

York 1 per cent Bonds" 500,000.00 

"Spring Valley Water Works First Mort- 
gage 6 per cent Bonds" 123,000.00 

"Spring Valley Water Works Second 

Mortgage 4 per cent Bono's 462,000.00 

"Spring Valley Water Works Third Mort- 
gage 4 per cent Bonds" 1,020,000.00 

"Citv of San Luis Obispo 5 per cent 

Bonds 15,750.21 

■0 "The Merchants' Exchange 7 per cent 

Bonds" 1,300,000.00 

"San Francisco Gas and Electric Com- 
pany 4^ per cent Bonds" 495,000.00 

5— Interest on Miscellanenous Bonds accrued to Janu- 
ary 1, 1905 ...; 

6— (a) Real Estate situated in the City and County of 
San Francisco ($168,946.01), and in the Counties of 
Santa Clara ($151,631.89). Alameda ($159,714.18), and 
San Mateo ($13,665.07) in this State, the actual value 

of which is 

(b) The Land and Building in which said Corpora- 
tion keeps its said Office, the actual value of which 

is 456,585.70 

The condition of said real estate is that it belongs 
to said Corporation, and part of it is productive. 

7— Proportion of Taxes for the Fiscal Year 1904-1905 
chargeable to next half year 

8— Cash in United States Gold and Silver Coin, belong- 
ing to said Corporation, and in its possession, and 
situated at its said Office, actual value 2,160,530.39 

Total Assets $62,020,961.41 



266,046.58 



493,957.15 



45,324.75 



LIABILITIES 



"Registered 4 per cent of 1907 ($12,500,000.00) and 4 per 
cent of 1925 ($2,520,000.00) United States Bonds," and 
are payable only to the order of said Corporation. 

4— Miscellaneous Bonds, the acutal value of which is 8,284,294.97 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: They 

belong to said Corporation, and are kept and held 

by it in its own Vaults and are there situated. They 

are: "Market Street Cable Railway Company 6 per 

cent Bonds" $1,121,000.00 

' 'Market Street Railway Company First 
Consolidated Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds" 340,000.00 
"Sutter Street Railway Company 5 per 

cent Bonds" 150,000.00 

"Powell Street Railway Company 6 per 

cent Bonds" 158,000.00 

"The Omnibus Cable Company 6 per cent 

"Bonds" 82,000.00 

"Presidio and Ferries Railroad Company 

6 per cent Bonds." 26,000.00 

"Ferries and Cliff House Railway Com- 
pany 6 per cent Bonds" 6,000.00 

"Los Angeles Railway Company of Cali- 
fornia 5 per cent Bonds" 145,000.00 

"Northern Railway Company of Califor- 



-Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to and 

the actual value of which is 5S,b48,l8^.&i 

The condition of said deposits is that they are pay- 
able only out of said Assets and are fully secured 
thereby. 



2— Reserve Fund, actual value 



3,372,779. C9 



Total Liabilities *62,C 



),961.41 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By JAMES R. KELLY, President 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
inx^ in.o By ROBERT j_ TOBIN, Secretary 



State of California, City and County of San Francisco, ss: 

JAMES R- KELLY and ROBERT J. TOBIN being each sepa- 
rately duly sworn, each for himself, says: lhat said JAMES R. 
k-ftty s President and that said ROBERT J. TOBIN is Sec- 
retory of THE H?BBRNI A SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
the Corporation above mentioned, and that the foregoing state- 
ment is true. JAMES R. KELLY, President 
ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 



Subscribed and sworn to before rn^thg ^ ^of^an^rv. 19^. 
In and for the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 




Views of Port Arthur. 

5>6e Minister of Foreign Affairs 



One of the strangest of recent 
Peace and War national diplomatic and war- 
Preparations, office mysteries is that every 
one of the nations that has ac- 
cepted President Roosevelt's invitation to a peace 
congress is as -busy as a bee repairing and making 
seaworthy all old warships and rushing work on new 
ones. Even China feels the need of a much larger 
navy, and like all Europe, her gun factories are run- 
ning on over-time. Evidently President Roosevelt's 
invitation is misunderstood ; that he meant a general 
war and not universal peace. Perhaps it all grows 
out of a silly statement of a St. Petersburg paper 
that the United States is paving the way to add the 
Latin American States to their colonial possessions. 
and foolishly enough, our Panama Canal venture is 
cited as proof of the charge. 

The war in the Far East has 
In the Far East, ceased until Japan is through 
celebrating the fall of Port Ar- 
thur and Russia is through mourning over the same 
event. But meanwhile the Japanese Port Arthur 
army of investment is getting ready to join Oyama 
in the north, to which point 200.000 of the reserves 
in Japan are ready and awaiting marching orders to 
the same locality. It looks now as though quite a 
million men will engage in the next battle. Both 
sides are preparing to strike a "crushing and decisive 
blow." But very likely the opposing warships will 
meet and have it out before the weather will permit 
the land forces to go into the open. If the usual per- 
centage of killed and wounded is maintained when 
the Generals and the Admirals get through, the naval 
engagement and the land battle will cost the belli- 
gerants fully 100,000 in killed and wounded. 

Advices from the Transvaal are 

Boers Making discouraging to those who pinned 

Trouble. their faith to Boer integrity when 

the treaty of Veruniging between 
the British and the Boers was signed. Not only 
are the Boers showing contempt for the compact, 
but there is a suspicion that they are intriguing with 
the Swases, the Kaffirs and other native tribes to 
revolt against British authority in the Transvaal 
and Orange River Colony. These tribes are not only 
blacks, but they are far more bloodthirsty and treach- 
erous than the worst tribe of Indians this nation 
ever had to deal with. The majority of the Boers 
now openly assert that they never were and never 
will be British citizens, and it is believed that their 
defiance is based upon some sort of an alliance with 
the savage tribes to revolt. It is surmised that as 



many as <So,ooo British soldiers will be required to 
keep the country in line. And in the face of their 
treachery, the Boers are paying England for an in- 
dependent Government and the withdrawal of all 
British troops, except from the principal garrisons. 

The London Court Journal sug- 

A Significant gests that, since it is clear that 

Suggestion. some day the commerce of China 

will be the biggest prize in the 
world, it behooves the "western civilization" to see 
to it that the right party wins in the Russo-Japanese 
war. Setting court language aside, and using plain 
English, the Journal means that England and the 
United States must see to it that Japan is the win- 
ner. In this connection, it may be observed that 
both France and Germany are beginning to see quali- 
ties in the Japanese that are to be admired. That is 
to say, the fall of Port Arthur and the danger that 
the Baltic fleet is likely to join the Port Arthur squad- 
ron at the bottom of the sea, are causing the diplo- 
matists of these friends of Russia to trim their sails 
a little. There was a lot of sentiment in the French 
and German leaning towards the Czar, but the cold 
and calculating. schemes of the Anglo-Saxon to cap- 
ture the commerce that is to follow the Russo-Jap- 
anese peace treaty are awakening them to the fact 
that sentiment and commerce do not make good 
bedfellows. 

There is fear in Berlin that 
In Southwest Africa, the native blacks of Ger- 
many's Southwest African 
possessions are negotiating with other African tribes 
for a united assault upon the white race, wherever 
that race has secured a foothold in Africa. And there 
is good reason that there is cause for alarm. In fact. 



Q 



'WHITE HORSE 
CELLAR" 

Scotch Whisky 



Q 



IN CASES ONLY 
NEVER IN BULK 



Try it once and you wi'l never use any other brand 



Q 



CHARLES ME1NECKE 
& CO. 

Agents Pacifle Coast 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 



£2 



January 7. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



43 




An "Intellectual" 
Talks to the 
News Letter. 



it is suggested in high official circles in more than 
one European capital that the time has come when 
prudence demands the solidarity of the white nations 
that the issue between the murderous tribes of Africa 
and civilization be met in a way that will not only 
settle the right of the white race to supremacy, but 
settle it in a way that it will last for all time, with 
no one to gainsay it. 

A Russian, and a member of 
the "Intellectuals," who is in 
San Francisco for a few days, 
said to the writer, concern- 
ing the political situation in 
Russia : "No, there is not likely to be more than a 
little rioting over the Czar's dilly-dallying with the 
demands of the reformers, and the disgraceful defeats 
of our arms in Manchuria. That is one of the things 
the "Intellectuals" are as anxious to prevent as they 
are anxious for a better and a more wholesome sys- 
tem of Government. I think you do not fully under- 
stand the purpose of the "Intellectuals" in this coun- 
try. In the first place, we want a constitutional 
monarchy, but we do not want it until the people are 
fitted for it. You must understand that the popula- 
tion of Russia as a whole are fitted for Czarism, and 
nothing better, but they would be under proper con- 
ditions, and the chief of these conditions is education. 
The ignorance of the majority of the Czar's subjects 
is dense. Now, what the "Intellectuals" are striving 
for is to induce the Emperor to agree to change our 
form of Government into a constitutional monarchy, 
but not now — nearly a quarter of a century hence, 
say. Meanwhile, we want him to choose men for the 
several bureaus who are in sympathy with our pur- 
pose. We want a free school system, with compul- 
sory education, established in all parts of the Empire. 
We want religious liberty and freedom of the press 
right away. We want the Government to encourage 
industries, invention and mechanics. We want proper 
reciprocal trade treaties with other nations as soon 
as such a policy would be expedient. We want merit 
instead of family 'pulls' to be the measure for promo- 
tion in the army and navy. We want the details of 
the affairs of the Empire put into the hands of the 
nobility and intellectual business men, and we want 
every public official to work earnestly and honestly 
to fit the people for such personal liberty as a con- 
stitutional monarchy would give them. We would 
have, say, the year 1920, proclaimed now as the time 
for the new form of Government to become opera- 
tive. Meanwhile the public school system would fit 
thousands of young men to fill the minor offices 
throughout the country. Old men and young men 
would thus be stimulated to work for the best inter- 
ests of the Empire, that the constitutional Govern- 
ment might be inaugurated in a blaze of national 



From Overland Monthly. 

pride and loyalty. In the meantime, the entire ma- 
chinery of the Government to be operated with the 
view of making the event of 1920 mark the emer- 
gence of Russia from the darkness of ignorance and 
Czarism into the light and enjoyment of your own 
glorious reality of 'Life, liberty and the pursuit of 
happiness.' And, strange as it may seem, we have 
more fear of defeat from the socialists than from the 
Czar and the bureaucrats. They demand the impos- 
sible and the unnatural. Next to bureaucracy, social- 
ism is Russia's greatest enemy. Oh, yes, all Russia 
wants the Japs thoroughly whipped, but that job 
must not interfere with the preparations for 1920." 

The Use of Borden's 

Eagle Brand Condensed Milk Insures strong, healthy children, as 
reputable physicians testify. Those who use it for their babies 
are spared the dangerous disorders of Infantile digestion; their 
children mature as they should, and in weight, size and health. 
Beware of unknown brands. 




FINE FURS 

WILL BE 

SACRIFICED 

We are compelled to move Jan* 

1, on account of transfer of lease 

Genuine Boyal Ermine Four-in- 
Hands, $16 up; Neck Boas. $3 up; 
Mink Four-in-Hands. $7 up; some 
uncalled-for garments, including Seal - 
akin Jackets, will be sold for the 
amount of charges due. 

Siberian Fur Company 

Incorporated 

An KnrniTR (THE pliable 

All. aUtUtB FURRIER.) MAN'Q. 

121 POST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Upstairs. Rooms 7-11, bet. Kearny & 

Grant ave. 
Our temporary Salesrooms and Fac- 
tory, from the l:-t of Jan. 1905. until 
future notice will be located at 36 
Geary St., (Easterbrook hide..) 4lh fir. 
bet- Kearny &, Grant Ave. (Elevator.) 




MISS LOUISE MANNING, Manner 

MRS. CLARICE COHEN, President 



House and Church Wed- 
dings. 

Receptions, Luncheons, 
Dinners, and Funerals. 

Supply and care of flowers 
for offices. 

Choicest cut Sowers. 



246 StocKton St. 

Corner Post 
TELEPHONE MAIN 847 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 




SSIC5I 




i. should not be a bit surprised if other brides 
adopted the pretty customs introduced by Marie 
Voorhies at her wedding on Saturday afternoon. In- 
stead of having the sacred ceremony performed be- 
fore a crush of people, only a few intimate friends 
were there, the throng of people afterwards coming 
and going just as at any tea. There was no rice pelt- 
ing or old slipper throwing, the bride outstaying her 
friends, so that she could carry away to her new 
home the memory of the last sweet, solemn leave- 
taking. 

The Voorhies home has the rare quality of dis- 
tinction which few houses possess, and in its gala 
attire of bloom, it was a very effective background 
for the smartly gowned women who came and went 
during the reception hours. The handsomest woman 
in the receiving party was Mrs. Tom Bishop, who re- 
turned from the southland just in time for the wed- 
ding. Mrs. Bishop has a stunning figure, and she 
knows better than to freight it with fussy fol-de- 
rols. Her gowns are always extremely simple and 
in exquisite taste. 

The few friends who were given a peep at the wed- 
ding gifts were impressed with their number and 
magnificence. Marie Voorhies has always been im- 
mensely popular, and people simply showered her 
with remembrances. Her home at Schuylkill Arse- 
nal will be a very lovelv one, and will no doubt be 
further ornamented by handsome tapestries as soon 
as the bride's deft fingers find time to accomplish 
them. The beautiful tapestries which hang in the 
Voorhies drawing room were all painted by Marie, 
who is one of the most gifted girls in that line in 
San Francisco. 

* * * 

If all the eggs that were used on Xew Year's day 
were put end to end, they would extend from here 
to the hereafter. Egg-nogg parties went merrily all 
day Sunday and Monday. The holiday falling as it 
did, gave legitimate excuse for the festivities extend- 
ing into Monday. I heard one chap who had already 
been to four receptions, say that his head touched 
both sides of the room as lie drank his hostess' health 
at the fifth place. The good, old-fashioned New 
Year's "at home" fell into disrepute for this very 
reason. People thought that the day was becoming 
a Carnival of Bacchus, and the flowing bowl "flew 
the coop." But the last two or three years the cus- 
tom has been gingerly revived, "tried out," as it were, 
and the consensus of opinion is that Mr. Man has 
learned to put sufficient brake on his convivial spirit 
to make the custom unobjectionable. At the dozen 
"open houses" on New Year's day, there was admir- 
able restraint shown when punch was passed, and 
as a result the men who attended all of the receptions 
were still in excellent trim at the end of the day. 

One of the prettiest teas given on New Year's day 
was hostessed by Miss Leontine Blakeman, who is 
one of the few in the younger set who can handle a 
large crowd with charming lack of favoritism, 
greeting all her friends with the same genuine cor- 
diality. 

* * * 

The Dutton-Howell wedding on the nth is the 
next dress parade affair. As the marriage will be 
celebrated in Trinity, there will be ample room for 
Society and Cousin-German to Society, and everv- 
one will have on their very gladdest rags. These big 
church weddings are gladsome affairs for the cou- 



touriere, for not to have on a new gown at a smart 
wedding is to argue yourself economical — and what 
worse sin in these days ot reckless extravagance? 
Miss Dutton ought to look very handsome in her 
bridal robes, and as her maids are attractive, it will 
lie a very effective wedding party. 

The engagement of Susie Le Count to the Rector 
of (irace Episcopal Church is only another proof of 
the fact that school girl friendships are not straws, 
which show which way the character blows. When 
Susie McEwen was at the most fashionable seminary 
in ( lakland, her most intimate friend was Gertrude 
Lamson, now known the seven seas over as Nance 
O'Neil. Even in those days, Gertrude Lamson loved 
to pin on a table-cloth train and strut through blood- 
curdling roles, while Susie Le Count was a shy, re- 
tiring girl who left the center of the stage to her 
more pyrotechnic schoolmate. But the two were in- 
separable friends, their very dissimilarities cement- 
ing the bond of affection. That one girl should be 
wedded to the drama and the other marry into the 
church, is only in tune with their early character- 
istics. 

There are merry times these days at the Crocker 
place in San Mateo, where Templeton Crocker is 
entertaining a party of chaps who came out from the 
East with him in his private car. As these Eastern- 
ers are all sprigs of distinguished and wealthy fam- 
ilies, the girls who will meet them considered them- 
selves lucky maidens. Duane Hopkins, W. S. Cush- 
ing, Burrell Huff, C. J. Copman, George Freeborn 
and C. A. Munn comprise the party. Mr. Crocker's 
guests will be invited to all the smartest functions 
that take place during their stay here, and their 
presence will add a spice of novelty to the affairs. 

The dinner dance given last week by Mrs. Henry 
Scott is still the motif ot conversation. Mrs. Scott 
is not one of the women who believe in letting down 
the bars that separate the sheep from the goats, so 
the climbers have found little encouragement from 
her. As a result, however, of this rigid culling of 



Everyone Needs a 

Perfect Hair Tonic 



Whether to Retain the normal 
scalp or to promote the growth 
of a healthy head of hair. 



DR. E. E. McLEAN 



IHIR PHYSICIAN 




Offices: 201-215 CILL BUILDING ^ 

Branches in Principal Cities on the Pacific Coast. 



Dr. McLean's method of treating the hair and 
the use of the perfect hair tonics prepared by her 
have placed her foremost in her profession, as is 
easily proven by the prominent people among her 
patients, who are only too glad to recommend her 
treatments and tonics. 



January 7. 1905. 

her calling list, her affairs are always made up en- 
ters" to 
a chill in in Thursday night, the 

I with mirth, a> though another 
earthquake had come to town. 

* • • 

The annual Christmas dinner of the Bohemian 

Club to-night will be discussed to the tune of some 

■ Christmas carols, prepared by Wallace Sabin, 

who has charge of the musical section. The custom 
of this dub giving the Christmas dinner a week late 
sensible one, lor it means that the members 
with "home ties," who could not be there on the 
Yuletide evening, have a chance to participate, and 
there are thus few empty chairs at the gathern 
the Bohemian family. 

* * * 

Miss Georgie Spieker expects to be gone only two 
months on her European jaunt, and when she returns 
I hear that the world and his wife will not be sur- 
prised if they are let into a very interesting secret. 

* * * 

The dinner given by Mrs. J. R. K. Xuttall on Tues- 
day evening was the perfect success that only Mrs. 
Xuttall knows how to achieve. She is a wizard at 
drawing out cleverness in people, and conversation 
always bristles with epigrams when Mrs. Nuttall 
leads it. Moreover, she is a woman who would not 
sacrifice a friend's feelings for the sake of making 
a smart remark. Mrs. Nuttall is in great demand, 
and as a dinner guest herself, her wit always putting 
the company on good terms with itself, and at her 
own dinner party she simply sparkled. 

* * * 

A recent telegram announces the engagement of 
Miss Nanny Schmelzkopf, daughter of Mr. Frederick 
Hohwiesner, of this city, and has just been published 
in Bremen, Germany. The telegram states that 
Captain M. Engelbrecht, of the 39th Regiment, Dues- 
seldorf, Germany, is to be the husband of this accom- 
plished young lady, whose early education began in 
San Francisco. Miss Schmelzkopf has been the 
guest of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Tillmann, 
of Bremen, wdiere the ceremony will be solemnized 
early this year. 

A good bracer is what you need after your holiday 
shopping. Always have a little GOOD whisky in 
your home. GOOD whisky means pure whisky. A. 
P. Hotaling & Co.'s famous OLD KIRK, best on the 
market. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



45 



NEW VIEWS OF PORT ARTHUR 

General Stoessel's heroic defense of Port Arthur and the city's 
final capture by the Japanese makes a most thrilling chapter 
in the world's history. Those who are interested in the great 
struggle in the Orient will find a good article in January SUN- 
SET MAGAZINE on "China, the New West," written by Mr. 
F. W. Unger, war correspondent of the London Times, and il- 
lustrated by four full-page reproductions of photographs taken 
at Port Arthur. Many other interesting news articles. For 
sale at all news stands. 



Burton Holmes, celebrated the world over as a lecturer, is 
again before us with his "Travelogues." We have rarely lis- 
tened to a more interesting or instructive talker than Mr. 
Holmes, and he speaks from actual experience. The two courses 
this season will include London, Round About London, Ireland, 
Russia and Japan. In view of the great political developments 
going on in the world at large, Mr. Holmes' lectures should en- 
tice large audiences at Lyric Hall, January 10th to 20th. 



•: Mondav .ii'ti rni on, tl 

ition to Mr-. Marj Hi n \ .li, from 

to five o'clock. Seventeen ol Mr-. De Wolfs paint- 
ings were exhibited, of which quite a num 

sold. They all -bowed her wonderful talent ai 

ceived the most favorable comment of the a--, milled 
gue-ts. The members of thi i lub made the 

afternoon particularly delightful with a collation I 

, gg ,,, ,_.._. an d delicacies, served bj several of it- 
charming member-. 

This is not idle gossip; every man and woman 
knows Hotaling's OLD KIRK whisky i- pure. A 
little "smile" will make a hard day's shopping sim- 
ple. 

LUXOR APARTMENT HOTEL, 857 Sutter St. 
5 and 6 room apartments, electric dumb elevators 
connect all apartments with cafe. The Luxor Grill, 
with its harmonious environment and thorough equip- 
ment, has become a favorite place for fashionable diners 
out, and on many occasions is the scene of pleasant 
dinner parties, at which are assembled many of our 
city's most prominent people. The management of 
of the Luxor have made the Grill a special feature of 
the hotel. 



Tou can't help enjoying a visit to the Techau Tavern, where 

the best people In town gather nightly after the th«atr«. Best 
rood, wine* and music. 



TOUPEES 

Toupees and wigs for men— light, cool and fitting perfectly. Im- 
possible to detect them from the natural hair. You do not realize 
the satisfaction of a toupee until you wear one of mine. Mani- 
curing and face massage for men. 

G. Lederer, 123 Stockton St. 

Everything in Hair Goods for LatlMs and Genilenn-n. 




** Delicious Menus Delicately Designed ^ 

Christmas Tree Decorations and Ornaments. 
Individual Dinner Cards. Christmas Cards and 
Name Cards and Mower Gifts. Call and see them. 






•^D«comfor<, 




231 



MRS. L. J. WHEELOCK, Maaager 



PH1NE BUSH 660 



LA VERITE TOILET COMPANY 

Ground Floor Parlors 

Hair Dressing, Egg and Electric Shampoo, Manicuring. 
Gentlemen's and Ladies' Wigs to order. Vibrator Scalp and 
and Facial Treatment Deep Wrinkles Removed. 

247 O'FARRELL STREET 

Near Powell San Francisco 



The Star Hair Remedy — best of all tonics and restoratives. 

Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not a dye. 
At druggists and hair dressers. Accept no substitute. Star 
Remedy Co., 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

French Savings Bank. 

For the six months ending December 31, 1904, a dividend has 

been declared at the rate of three and one-quarter (3 1-4) per cent 

per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, payable on or after 

January 3, 1905. l^EON BOCQLTERAZ, Secretary. 



4 6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 



^ ffl ft 



ERIE 
RAILROAD 

The most delightful scenery 
between Chicago and New 
York City. Limited trains 
every morning, afternoon and 
evening, with through equip- 
ment for Buffalo, New York, 
Albany and Boston. Highest 
type of Pullman and dining 
car service. 

Every mile of the track is 
protected by the safety block 
signal system. 

A. C. HILTON 

Pacific Coast Passenger Agent 
330 MarKet St. San Francisco, Cal. 



Mr. Geezley — I see that the Mi- 
kado opened the war diet the other 
day. Mrs. Geezley — Poor soldiers. 
More canned goods, I suppose. 




ALL TDE YEAR 
ROUND TOURS 

Travel by Sea 



Excellent Service, Low Rates, Includlnz Berth and Meals 



Los Angeles San Diego Banta Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Tacoma 

Victoria Vancouver Etc. 

And to those desiring longer trips to 
Alaska and Mexico. 

For Information regarding Billing dales etc.obtilo folder 

SAN FRANC1S0 TICKET OFFICES 

4 New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St- , and Broadway Wharves. 

C. D. DUNANN. General PasseDger Agent 
10 Market Street, San Francisco 



-THL- 



North=Western Line 



Russia= Japan Atlas 



Send ten cents in stamps to R. R. 
Bitohie, No. 617 Market street, 
San Francisco, for Busso-Japan- 
War A 1 1 & s issued by the 
Chicago and Northwestern 
Bailway. three fine colored maps 
each 14-20, bound in convenient 
torm for reference. The Eastern 
Situation shown in detail with 
tabled showing relative military 
and naval strength and financial 
resources of Eussia and Japan. 

R. R. RITCHIE, G. A. P. C. 

Chicago and Northwestern Bailway 

617 Market St., S. F. (Palace Hotel) 




ZZZir*- Coast Line 



SAN FRANCISCO. 

Fbov Ootqbxb 2S, lt*t 

FmnT DXPOT 
(Toot of Market fltr— s.) 



Narrow Gauge* 

(Foot of Market Stieet) 



MAIN LINE. 



■ ABBtTI 



7-DDa Vs-eaTlIle, Winters, Kmnaey 750* 



7.20F 



620p 
7.20' 



7.60* 



4.20* 

4.60* 

4.20P 

4.20P 
6.20P 

6.60P 



7.00a Benlcla, Elmlra and Sacramento 
7.30a Vallejo. Napa, Callstoea, 8inU 
Hobs, Martinez, San Hum on 

7 30a Nllea. Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton.... 

8 00a Shasta Express — (Via Davis). 

Williams, Wlllowa, tFrnto. Red 
Bluff. Portland, Tacoma. Seattle 

8 00a DaTls. Woodland, Knights Landing. 

MaryBTlllcOrovllle 7.60P 

8-30a Martinez, Anttoch. Byron, Tracy. 
Stockton, Newman, Lot Banoa, 
Mendota. Armenia, Hantord, 
Vlaalla. Porterrlll© 

8 30a Port Coats, Modesto, Merced, 
Fresno, Goshen Junction, llan- 
ford, Vloalla. Bakerslleld 

8-30a Nllea. San Jose. Llrermore. Stock- 
ton, (tMHton), lone, Sacrnmento, 
Maryevlile, Chlco. Kert llliiff .... 

830a Oakdale, Chinese, Jameatown. So- 

nora, Trjolnmne and Annela 2' ^n 

8 00A AtlantlcExpreBB— Ogdennnd Raac. ' ' 

8.30a Richmond, Martinez and Way 

Stations 

10 00A The Overland Limited — Ogden. 
Omaha, Chicago, Deliver, Kansas 

City, St. Louis .S-fiSS 

10.00a Vallejo 12.20P 

10.00A Lot AngelPB Passenger — Port 
Costa. Martinez, Byron. Tracy, 
Lathrop. Stockton. M treed, 
Raymond. Fresno. Gosbi-n Junc- 
tion, Hanford, Lemoore, Vlitalls, 

Bakerafleld. Loa Angeles 7-ZOP 

12.00m Hayward, Nllcsand Way Stations. * 20p 
t1 .OOP Sacrnmento River Steamers Hi. OOP 

3.S0P Benlcla, WlnterB. Sacramento. 
Woodland, Knights Landing, 
Marysvllle, Orovllle and way 
stations '9 £2* 

I.30P Hayward. Nllea and Way Stations.. 7.60P 

I-30P FortCoflta, Martinez, Byrou.Tracy, 
Lathrop, Stockton, Modesto, 
Merced, Berenda, Fresno and 
Way Stations beyond Port CobU 12-20* 

4.00P Martinez, SanHamon.ValleJo.Napa, 

Callatoga. San ta Rosa 9 20 A 

4-OOp Nlles, Tracy. Stockton 10 20a 

4.30P Hayward. Nlles, Irvlngton, San 1 tB.6pA 
Jose. Llvermore I t 11.60a 

6-OOpTho Owl Limited— Newman, Los 
Banos, Mendoia, FreBno. Tulare, 

Bakerafleld. Lot Angeles 8-50 a 

t6 30p Hayward, Nlles and San Jose 7 20a 

I.OOp Hayward. Nllea and 6an Joae 8.60a 

8-OOp Eastern Express— Omaba, Chicago, 
Denver, Kansas City, St. Loula, 
Martinez, Stockton. Sacramento, 
Colfax, Reno, Sparks, Montello, 
Ok'deo 12.60P 

I.OOp Vaih'jo. dally, except Sunday.... I 7 en. 

7-OOp Vallejo, Sunday only f " ww 

7 O0p Richmond, Ban Pablo, Port Costa, 

Marlines and Way Stations 11.20a 

7-OOpRcno Passenger— Port Costa, Be- 
nlcla, Sutsun, Elmlra, Dixon, 
Davis, Sacramento, Sparks, Tono- 
pah. Keeler and Way Stations... 

8.06P Oregon A California Express— Sao- 

i ramento, Maryavllle, Redding, 

Portland, Pngat Sound and Bast. 

1.10* Hayward, Nils* and Ban Joaa (Sosv 
dsyoaUy) 



B-IEa Newark. Ceotervllle, Baa Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and W ay StatlonB 6-l5s* 

t2-16p Newark, Centervtlle, San Jose, 
New Almaden.Los Outos.FeltoO, 
Boulder Creek, Banta Crux and 
Principal Way Stations t10-96a 

4. Up Newark, Ban Jose, Los Gatos. .. -j ^ggg* 
a0 3Cp Hunters* Train (Saturday only)— 

8an Joae and Way Stations t7-26* 

COAST LINE (ltroad l.auge). 
f y (Third and TownBeud Streets.) 

6 ITa San Jose and Way Stations .. 6 30* 

7 (I a San Jose and Way Stations 6. 40* 

E 00a Npw Almaden (Tues., Frld.. only). 4.10* 
6-00A The Coaster— San Jose, Salinas, 

Sao Ardo, Paao Robles, Santa 
Margarita, San Lais Obispo, 
Guadalupe, Oavlota, Santa Bar- 
bara, San Buenaventura, Mon- 
talvo, Oxnard, Burbank, Los 
Angeles 10 30* 

8.00A Gllruy. Hollleter, Caitrovllle, Del 
Monte, Pacific Grove, Surf, Lom- 
poc 10.30* 

8.00a ban Jose. Trea Plnos.Wstsonvllle, 
Capltola. Sauta Cruz, PiirlOe 
Grove, Salinas. San LuIb Obispo 
and Principal Way Stations. ... 410p 

10 ?Ca tan Jose and Way Stations 1-20* 

11 il A San Jose and Way Stations 7.30* 

2 >5p ben Jose and Way Stations 838a 

i LLP I)«.'l Monte Kxpress— Santa Clara, 

San Jose, Wa tson v 111 e. Banta 
Cruz, Del Monte, Monterey, 

Pacific G rove 12-15* 

<3-00p Los Gatos, Wright, Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, via Santa Clara and 
Narrow Gauge +10 45a 

5-3Cp Valencia St., South San Francisco, 
BarllngHme, San Jose, Gllroy, 
Hollleter, TresPInos 10 45a 

4 30p an Joae and Way Stations 1800a 

tL-OOP Santa Clara, ban Jose, Los Gatos, 
and principal Way Stations (ex- 
cept Sunday) I8-00A 

|6. Z Op it.n J I.-I.I' an «l Principal Way 8 tat Ions 1840a 

b 46p buiiBd Express.— Redwood, San 
Jose, G Ilroy.Sallnas.Paso Robles, 
San Lula Obispo, Santa Barbara, 
Los Angeles, Iteming. El Paso, 
St. Louis. New Orleans, New York 9.10a 

S.45p Pajaro, Watsonvllle, Capitols. 
banta Cruz, CsstroTllle, Del 

Monte, Pacific Grove 10-30* 

16.16*- ■ "!■ Mateo.Bereaford.Belmont.San 
Carlos. Redwood, Fair Oaks, 
MenloPark. Palo Alto tt.48A 

6 30p San Jose snd Way Stations. 8.38a 

E L Dp Palo Alto and Way Stations 10 16a 

11 .JOp South San Francisco, Mlllbrae, Bnr- 
llngame, San Mateo, Belmont, 
San Carlos, Redwood, Fair Oaks, 

Meolo Park and Palo Alto tv-45* 

OjISQP Maybeld, Mountain View, Sonny- 
vale, Lswr«nc«, Santa Clara and 
8 an Joss t>.4B* 



7-60A 

8.MA 

11. 



A for Morning. P for Aftarnoos, 

1 Sunday sxesptad. i Sunday only 

<- Saturday only. • Monday only, 

{biops at all itstlosit os Sunday. 

Tbe UNION TUANSrEU COMPANY 

win call for snd *fct«k tan tf • rross totals a*4 rasa- 
dan— s. Tlas fc — s y " 



WMXtf.M#.v:¥.V.MV.M.M.MMMW 




Stylish HC 
Suits lv 



50 



Dressy Suits f 20 
Pants $4.50 



My $25.00 Suits are the£ 
best in America. jj 

•1 P Per Cent Saved by get-g 
Z ting your suit mide byjj 

JOE POHEIM g 

E ll/ Tit T»itll K 

M.mpio.S.nt 1110-1112 Mirket St S 

E 201-203 Montg'y St., S. F.S 

"Can he put up a good bluff" 
"No; he hasn't the sand." 



Union Pacific 

The most popular line to Salt Lake. Col- 
orado Springs, Denver. Omaha, Kansas 
City. St. Louis. Chicago and all points East 

A wonderful interesting journey through 
the heart of the Rocky Mountains by day- 
light. 

Through Pullman Sleepers 

dally to Chlce-go <& St- Loula 

Three Fast Express Trains 

every day. Perfect Dining 

Servloe *« •* ^< 

Handsomely Illustrated booklet "Sights 

and Scenes from the Car Window" free 

upon application. 

Get folders, rates and time table from 
any Southern Pacific Agent, or address 
S. F. BOOTH. OEN. A0T„ U. p. R. R. CO. 
No- 1. Montgomery St. San Francisco. Cal. 



PIANOS '""ffftlr, 

Sobmer Piano Agwncy 
308-312 Post St.3ao Francises 

Received Gold Medal— Hlgnest Award World's Fair, St. Louis, 1904. 



BYRON MAUZY 



January 7, 1905. 




jy^ANY a bet has been wagered 
and won over the superiority 
of CLUB COCKTAILS over 
guesswork or other brands. You 
can prove their excellence without 
betting, though. Try a bottle. 

Insist upon getting CLUB 
COCKTAILS — the original bot- 
tled brand. They're far superior 
to guesswork kind— you want the 
best — well, insist on getting CLUB. 

Always ready. Just strain 
through cracked ice and serve. 

Manhattan, Martini, Vermouth, Whis- 
key, Holland Gin, Tom Gin and York. 

C. F.HEUBLEIN & BRO., Sole Proprietors 

Hartford New York London 



PACIFIC COAST AOENTS 

SPOHN-PATRICK COMPANY 

San Francisco. Los Angeles. 
Denver. Bait Lake City. Seattle. 



SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thieves.) 

A colored preacher once asked 
an old darkey if in his experience 
prayers were ever answered, 
whereupon the latter replied : 
"Well, sah, some prayers is an- 
sud and some isn't — 'pends on 
what yo' ask fo'. Fur instuns, 
when it's mighty hard scratchin' 
fo' to git sumfin to eat, I 'bsarved 
dat w'enebber I prayed de Lo'd to 
sen' me a nice, fat turkey dat dere 
wa'nt no notis took of de suppli- 
cashun ; but w'en I pray dat he- 
sen' de ol' man fo' de turkey it 
was 'tended to befo' sunup nex' 
mornin', dead sartin." 

"Did you vin de 'race, Ike?" 
"No, it vas a dead heat." "Vat is a 
dead heat?" "Vat you'll get ven 
you die." 




THE GREAT AMERICAN 
MINERAL WATER 



LOUIS CAHEN ® SON. 

WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

4lS Sacramento St., San Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

After a stormy interview witli 
Mr. Boodelle, the successful con- 

litician, the indig- 
nant caller had gone sway, "1 fully 
expected \- -lug him," said 

the private secretary, "when he 
called you a 'persistent viola! 
the eighth commandment.'" "1 
suppose 1 ought to have dom 
said Mr. Hoodellc, grinding his 
teeth, "but 1 couldn't recall the 
eighth commandment to save my 
life." 

An Last Side youngster had 
been arrested for stealing the 
enamel letters off the window of 
the corner grocery store. His 
mother appealed to the alderman 
of the district, who has more Irish 
than American blood, for aid. "An' 
phat do yez want me ter do?" ask- 
ed the alderman. "Don't yez know- 
that stalin' letthers is a Federal 
ortinse?" 

The Russian Generals were in 
consultation. "Never mind, Pat, old 
fcoyski," said Stoessel; "it's not 
your faultovitch. You know war 
is only a game of chaneski." "It 
used to be sosky," replied the great 
leader, "but not since the Japsky 
loaded the diceovitch." Then 
Stakelberg set up the vodka. 

"Why, James Henry Pthudd!" 
exclaimed his wife, as he clam- 
bered up the stairs at 3 a. m. "What 
in the world do you mean by com- 
ing home at this hour, and in such 
a condition?" "Now, m' dear," ex- 
plained James Henry, carefully, 
"you jusht calm y'shelf. I been wiz 
Deacon Brown and Parson Jones, 
ded-catin' the new sh'loon on Main 
street." — Life. 

Passenger— I want a third-class 
ticket to Ballyhooly. Clerk— Yes, ' 
sir. Return? Passenger — Don't be 
too clever, young man. Why 
should I want a return when I'm 
here already? 

Fweddy — Don't you get tired, 
deah boy, of seeing the same old 
faces ovah and ovah again at 
comic opera? Cholly — Oh, no; I 
take all that as a matter of cho- 
rus. 

Kndcker— Does Smith's little 
boy believe in Santa Claus? 
Bocker — I should imagine so. 
Smith believes there must be some- 
thing to make his hair grow again. 

She — Did you ever take your au- 
tomobile apart to see how it 
worked? He — Well, not exactly. 
I have taken it apart to see how it 
didn't work. 

"Dorothy, does your mother be- 
long to the Daughters of the Revo- 
lution?" "No; I think she belongs 
to the continental dams." — Life. 



47 




An Irishman entered an office, 
took oft his hat politely to the man- 
ager, and said : "The top of the 
mornin' to ye, sor; I've been told 
ye're wantin' o' help." "I really 
have very little to do myself," was 
the reply. "Then," said the Irish- 
man, "I'm the boy for yez. It's lit- 
tle I care about doin', sure ; it's the 
money I'm after." 

"Professor Le Blanc is a bril- 
liant man." "Oh, I think he is over- 
rated. I talked French to him for 
half an hour last evening and he 
didn't understand a word I said." 

Old Party — You worry your 
mother terribly. Why are you so 
wicked? Bad Boy — 'Cause if I'm 
good she'll worry thinkin' I'm sick. 




flouhle Daily Service to All Points 
East via 

PUEBLO, KANSAS CITY 
a ST. LOUIS 

Through Pullman Sleeping ears and Ob- 
servation Cafe Dining Cars, with Electric 
Lights and Electric Fans, Scenic Bout* 
through Colorado. For tickets, berth reser- 
vations, folders, etc., call on or address 

- GENERAL TICKET OFFICE * 

625 Market Street. San Francisco, Gal. 

(Palace Hotel) 



48 

SORE AND BLEEDING GUMS 

Soft and spongy gums are made healthy 
by the mildly alkaline and astringent prop- 
erties of SOZODONT. It is the most 
fragrant deodorizer and antiseptic dentifrice 
known to the world. 

SOZODONT 

TOOTH POWDER 

the complement of SOZODONT Liquid, has 
abrasive properties, yet is absolutely free 
from grit and acid. It will not tarnish gold 
fillings or scratch the enamel. 

3 FORMS : LIQUID, POWDER, PASTE. 



Travers — I hear you are lectur- 
ing on the strenuous life? Palav- 
ers — Yes ; I got tired of hustling, 
and it's so much easier to tell 
other people what to do than it is 
to do things oneself. 
. "That policeman has three med- 
als for saving lives." "Three? I 
know a policeman who has- saved 
hundreds of lives and has never 
been decorated at all." "How did 
he save them?" "By escorting el- 
derly females across Broadway." 

Doctor — Madam, you needn't 
dread the disease. There is only 
about one chance in a hundred that 
you will get it. Mrs. Hichurch 
(relieved) — H'm ! Something on 
the order of a church fair chance, 
eh ? — Judge. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

"She used to be very fond of 
horses ; she was in her riding habit 
nearly all the time." "Oh, she af- 
fects the automobile habit now." 
"What's that?" "Running over 
everything that gets in her way." 
Calvert, Jr. — Then a bigamist 
might be described as one who 
has formed an incurable habit of 
love's young dream? Baity More 
— Yes — love's Brigham Young 
dream. 

Upgardson — The idea of your 
criticising modern preaching! You 
haven't been inside a church build- 
ing for twenty years. Atom — 
Thai's an infamlous falsehood! 
When I was in Rome in 1897 I 
spent nearly a whole day in St. 
Peter's Cathedral, blame you! 



•"P^S^-t 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 

Bear the script name ol Stewart 
Hartshorn on label. 

Wood Rollers. Tin Hollers. 



"And what were the provisions 
of your uncle's will?" "That 1 
should have all he left after the 
payment of his just debts." "Ah ! 
very good of the old man, wasn't 
it? What did he leave?" "Just 
debts." 



ENNE1VS taK 
3TPILET 



4.f°Wi«R< 



[CHAPPED HANDS, CHAFING, 

d all tfffiojofu of tbc alrin. "A Utile 
' higher in price, perheps, l/ten morthlcu 
substitutes, but 2 reason for it." De- 
lightful after shaving. Sold everywhere, or 
matted 00 receipt of 25c. 
fJERrtARD MENNEN CO.. Newark. N. J. 



Ethei — What makes you so 
naught}', Bobbie? Bobbie — Dun- 
no, but mother says there's a good 
angel and a bad angel each fightin' 
for me, and I expect the bad an- 
gel's licked the other one. 

First Microbe — Why did you 
move out of that telephone re- 
ceiver? Second Microbe — It was 
nut the proper atmosphere in which 
l" bring up a family of children; 
there was too much swearing on 
that line." 

Box-Car Bobby — How long d'ye 
s'posc it's been since Dusty Dan 
took a bath? Tie-Pass Tim — Well, 
he looks ter be about forty-eight 
years old. 



January 7, 1905. 

HAND 

SAPOLIO 

FOR TOILET AND BATH 

Pinters roughened by needlework 

catch every stain and look hopelessly 
dirty. Hand Sapollo removes not only 
the dirt, but also the loosened, injured 
cuticle, and restores the fingers to 
their natural beauty. 

ALL GROCERS AND DRUGGISTS 



Biffin was introducing his part- 
ner to a new restaurant. "You will 
find it homelike here," he said. 
"The place s clean, the food whole- 
some, and the waitresses are neat 
in appearance and refined in 
speech." And just then their own 
particular waitress turned to them 
and said : "Will youse have your 
cocoas wid your lunches or will 
youse take 'era wid your poi?" 

Hix — I see some scientist is 
claiming that kissing is a cure for 
dvspepsia. Dix — Well, what good 
is that to a married man if he is 
only allowed to kiss his wife? 

"Did my diamonds call forth any 
comment?" asked Mrs. Cumrox. 
"Yes, indeed," answered Miss 
Cayenne. "I heard several people 
refer to you as the human chande- 
lier." 



GLADDING.McBEAN&C° 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRACOTTA 

I Fl RE PROOFI IMG • PRESSED BRICK | 

VITRIFIED ArloTERRA COTTA PIPE ETC. 

OFFICE RIALTO BUILDING 

WAREHOUSE 147-151 MINNA ST. 

I PHONE PRIVATE 54I.SANFRANCISC0.I 

WORKS LINCOLN.CAL. 



Rich Relative — I hope, Harold, 
you have finished sowing your wild 
oats and have begun to follow some 
remunerative employment. Scape- 
grace Nephew — I have, uncle. I 
am courting old Muntoburn's 
daughter. 




BUSH <& MALLETT CO 



INCORPORATED 




Bush & Mallett Co., one of the best-known firms in the city, occupy a large portion of the ground 
lloor of the Crossley Building, their entrances being at 618 Mission street and from 115 to 119 Jessie 
street. They are wholesale and retail dealers in mantels, grates, tiles, fire-place and bathroom furniture 
and parquetry hardwood floors. At the factory, corner Sixth and Bluxome streets, there are manufac- 
tured wood mantels, sideboards, bookcases, wood grilles, parquetry floors and other hardwood finish. 

The business of Bush & Mallett Co. has increased to such an extent that they became so cramped for 
room and shipping facilities they were obliged to move from 328 Post street to the more commodious, 
quarters they now occupy. The growing importance of Mission street as a business center largely en- 
tered into the consideration of the move, and no better location for their business could be selected than 
the Crossley Building, almost in the shadow of the Palace and Grand Hotels. The new apartments have 
been elaborately fitted up, regardless of expense. From Mission to Jessie street is a succession of show- 
rooms, displaying the wares of the firm. They are fitted up in various tints, with rugs to match, the ar- 
rangement being designed to best show off the goods on exhibition, and the rooms are lighted and heated 
by electricity. The shipping facilities are the very best and assure the most prompt delivery. 



618 Mission Street 



115-119 Jessie Street 




Selby Smelting 



=AND= 



Lead Company 

Bujers of Gold, Silver, Lead 
and Copper Ores, Lead Bul- 
lion, Cyanide Product, Etc. 

REFINERS OF GOLD AND SILVER 



ASSAYERS 

Location of works, Vallejo 
Junction, Cal. 

Office: 416 Montgomery St. 
San Francisco, California. 




Constant Meese, Pres. 
F.Gottfried. Vice Pres. 

W. N. Kelly, Secretary 



esse & dxitifrted (Eonqmnj?. 



ENGINEERS AND MACHINISTS 



>- 



No. 167 to 179 Fremont Street, S. F. 

Telephone: Exchonce Ail 
Branch Olflce-219 OCCIDENTAL AVE., SEATTLE. WASH. 



SPECIALTY 

Power Transmitting Machinery and 
all Pertaining Thereto. Link and 
Chain Belting. 



CLICQUOT 

Is BETTER than any other 

CHAMPAGNE 

there is no doubt about 
that BUT be sure you 
get the GENUINE, 
made specially for the 

taste of 
the 

American 
people 
and im- 
ported 
direct 
from 

FRANCE 
--Please 
notice 
that "I his" 
CLICQUOT "is not tied with a 

STRING." 

Insist on getting Clicquot bearing 

VIGNIER'S LABEL 








antees 



AV1GNIERG> 



lou uEirrs rot mr rAOnc coisr 



It guarantees the quality. 

BEWARE OF A SUBSTITUTE 



Price per Copy. 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY ao, 1856. Annual Subscription. $4.00 



1 NE^pgfE-TTER 




Vol. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JANUARY 14. 1905. 



Number 3. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER la printed and published 
•vary Saturday by the proprietor. Frederic. Marriott, Halleck 
Building. XSi S&nsome street. San Francisco. Ctfl. 

Kntered at San Francisco Fostoflice as second class matter 

.New York Office— (where Information may be obtained regardliiK 
aubacrlptlons and advertising)— 206 Broadway, C C. Murphy, 
Hepresentatlve. 

London Office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C. England, George Street A Co. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other emitter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEW 3 
LETTER ahould be sent to this office not later than I a. m. 
Thursoay previous to day of Issue. 



Bad as Mrs. Ch&dwick is, give her credit for re- 
fraining from writing a novel '>r giving personal rem- 
iniscences. 



The only peace that Japan will accept at the pres- 
ent writing is a large piece of the map of Asia. 

Admiral Kojestvensky is going home to Russia 
with his tleet to claim the international chumpion- 
ship. 



If (standard Oil has really broken into the local gas 
field, it's high time somebody flagged the effervescent 
Lawsun fur help. 

It is pleasant to be told that the California militia 
is to be reorganized with less gold braid and fewer 
bar-room Colonels. 

The pulpit suggestion that leisure is the chief 
cause of divorce, suggests one way out of the domes- 
tic service problem. 

The fate of the Trappist monks in an Alpine bliz- 
zard, would go to show that while faith is a mighty 
good thing, it will not keep the feet warm. 

It used to take champagne and greenbacks to set- 
tle a S.enatorship controversy at Sacramento, but now 
it's accomplished with red wine and canvasbacks. 

— ; 

A Georgia Democrat says his party is going to be 
re-born. Maybe, but it would be well to put it off un- 
til Hearst shows no disposition to play the midwife. 

The lady adventurer who Chadwicked her way 
into marital relations with the Duke millions, may be 
separated by law or by force from her husband, but 
never from the family fortune. 

The Diamond Trust adds 5 per cent to the price, 
making a total increase of 45 per cent in three years. 
And the Coal Trust wonders why it has ever been 
criticised. 



Appropriation bills, we 2 re gravely informed, are 
to be trimmed more closely than ever at Sacramento 
this session. The misappropriation bills will be scis- 
sored as gently as ever. 

That eminent divine, Dr. Heber Newton, opens the 
new year with an avowal of his belief in ghosts. The 
incredulous are already hinting at the effects of mince 
pies and plum puddings on the imagination. 



President Roosevelt has finally forced upon the 
Senate the appointment of a negro, W. D. Crum, as 
Collector at the port at Charleston, S. C. There is 
no crumb of comfort in this for unhappy Charleston. 



Abe Ruef is "behind" a bill to shut up the un- 
licensed Presidio groggerics. Thus, sometimes, put 
of evil conieth good. 

A theory is advanced that the Milwaukee horse that 
counts does it by means of hypnotism. Yes, indeed; 
hypnotism of the spectators. 

The distinguished gentlemen who have been im- 
plicated in the land frauds are beginning to feel that 
"Hon." before a fellow's name is not always a pro- 
tection when the law is hunting for stolen goods. 

Enough bills have been prepared by statesmen at 
Sacramento to supply the civilized world with laws 
for the century. But introducing bills is one of the 
sharp ways to get free advertising. 

From the behavior of a Pittsburg millionaire, who 
threw loaded pistols at his wife, and took strange 
women to his home", we see that not death, hut 
whisky, is the greatest leveler of mankind. 

Sixteen cocktails a day was the sworn record of a 
millionaire whose estate is now worrying several 
courts and delighting a swarm of lawyers. No won- 
der the deceased is said to have been "well pre- 
served." 



Since the new Governor of Missouri has taken 
office, the St. Louis boodlers whom he has driven 
■into exile are more sorrowful than ever when they 
listen to the strains of that sad, sweet melody, "The 
Old Folks at Home." 



Europeans who complain about American visitors 
prying loose and carrying off precious relics, forget 
that the Yankee tourist, being the Old World's chief 
source of revenue, is entitled to something for the 
"easy money" he leaves behind him. 

The Schmitz appointee who made believe for a 
day that he was going to refuse a $4,ooo-a-year job, 
because it was to last only one year instead of four, 
as he had expected, was only experimenting with his 
own feelings. 

From the dearth of picturesque accounts by eye- 
witnesses of the conditions inside Port Arthurs bat- 
tered walls, it may be interred that Japan is taking 
no chances on second editions of the "butcher-shop" 
descriptions that accompanied her other victory at 
Port Arthur. 



In the interest of science, a student at Wesleyan 
University has lived four days in a "calorimeter" 
without food. Whatever else he accomplished, lie 
has learned one of the secrets of life that few col- 
lege students get until after they have passed the 
bright and happy diploma period. . 



2 SAN FRANCISCO 

LIBRARY BOOKS AND COLLEGE EXAMINA- 
TIONS. 

One of the objections that the friends of the State 
University have often encountered throughout the 
interior and in the Legislature, is that it has come 
to be too much of a place for rich men's sons to spend 
their leisure and their money. Benjamin Ide 
Wheeler's administration has not done much to wipe 
out this impression. Last week, however, there was 
some legislation aimed in the right direction when it 
was announced at Berkeley that hereafter students 
who persisted in keeping out of the college library 
books bearing directly or indirectly upon examina- 
tions to come, would not be permitted to take those 
examinations. 

We hope, although we do not entirely believe, that 
this rule will be energetically and unheedingly en- 
forced. Its adoption comes as public recognition by 
the university authorities of one of the mean advan- 
tages taken by rich students over their poorer fel- 
lows. Some of these, with most of their brains in 
their pocket books, have been systematically stuffing 
the library, days and weeks before examination times, 
of literature relating to the subjects to be dealt with 
and no system of fines has sufficed to bring the books 
back until after the questioning has been completed. 
Considering that most of the books in demand for 
collateral reading upon such occasions are too tech- 
nical or too rare to be found except in a highly special- 
ized collection like that in the college library, and con- 
sidering, too, that no student of even moderate means 
can afford to incur fines amounting to a good many 
dollars for each volume thus improperly withheld, 
the handicap in favor of wealth is obvious. 

But experience has shown that the adoption of a 
severe college law and its enforcement as against the 
sons and daughters of men commanding influence by 
their wealth or their position, are two quite different 
things. It is of record that in very recent times 
the scapegrace sons of rich men have studied the 
university rules with diligence, in order to know 
which ones could be broken with the greatest noise 
and scandal ; it is known and recorded how such stu- 
dents have been marked for discipline by the faculty's 
Committee on Student Affairs; it is written down 
how the gentlemen of this Committee have seen 
things as if reversed after the fathers of the culprits 
had interviewed that eminent and consistent respecter 
of riches and influence, President Wheeler, and it is 
well known how the punishment, proclaimed with 
much parade and formality, has in many such cases 
gone no further than proclamation. On the other 
hand, there are conspicuous cases of poor young men 
convicted of college misdemeanors who have been 
unable to get so much as a re-hearing. 

"HIS ELOQUENT TONGUE WAGS TOO FAR." 

Bishop Hamilton is one of the most able men 
Methodism has produced — scholarly, vigorous and 
too bound in many intellectual respects to fit the nar- 
row Wesleyan creed. Much as he is to be admired 
for his endowments and respected for his attainments, 
he is not likely to be accepted as a true prophet when 
he proclaims, as he did in Oakland this week, his be- 
lief in a future Americanism which shall be blent of 
the Caucasian with not only the Ethiopian, but the 
Mongol. The eye of Bishop Hamilton's faith sees 
too much. His eloquent tongue wags too far. Thus 
he is quoted as speaking at a gathering of Methodists 
assembled for "church extension" purposes : "I sup- 
pose you will be offended if I prophesy, and I am no 
seer either, that I am looking into the faces of the 
great-great-grandfathers and great-great-grand- 



NEWS LETTER. January 14, 1905. 

mothers of Japanese and Chinese — yes, and of ne- 
groes. Anglo-Saxon is a belated term; the pure 
American is not yet born." 

More persons, we fancy, will be amazed and amused 
than will be offended by this singular preachment. 
It means that Bishop Hamilton believes — assuming 
that he says what he believes — that within the next 
hundred years the lines of racial distinction which 
were marked out before Christianity, as Bishop Ham- 
ilton understands it, was dreamed of, will be wiped 
away, and that the most conservative of Bishop 
Hamilton's descendants will be marrying without 
thought of color. And this, with due respect to the 
distinguished divine, is absurd. In all the scores of 
years of Methodism, its believers have not widened 
their creed far enough for them to disregard the lines 
of denominational difference — lines far less deeply 
grown upon humanity than those of racial distinc- 
tion—in this same matter of intermarriage. We can 
imagine what a shock it would be to Bishop Hamil- 
ton's diocese if one of its brilliant young clergymen 
should publish his intention to espouse a Jewess or a 
Roman Catholic or — we almost hesitate to say it — 
a Unitarian. Doubtless, the good bishop believes in 
— though he does not, we warrant, fully practice — 
the Christian doctrine of the universal brotherhood 
of man, but we conjecture that he has in mind a uni- 
versal brotherhood living in and up to the faith of 
Wesley. 

Perhaps, though, Bishop Hamilton may be a seer, 
and his forecast of a comparatively early abolition of 
the prejudices embodied in our laws against misce- 
genation may be true. Granting the clarity of his 
prevision, we will go him one better: When the 
"pure American" of the Bishop's black-and-tan-and- 
white imagining is born, there will be neither Metho- 
dists North nor Methodists South among the de- 
scendants of those "great-great-grandfathers and 
great-great-grandmothers" whom the Bishop saw in 
Oakland the other night ; there will not be any Metho- 
dists at all. Then it will not be, as it now is in Metho- 
dism, a sin to dance before the Lord, to gladden the 
stomach with wine, or to play at games of chance and 
skill, or to look upon the mimicry of the stage. There 
will not be any church at all, and so no"church ex- 
tension" meetings to listen to prophecies of what may 
come a hundred years thence. 

WILLIAMS' BONDSMEN. 

It was sixteen months ago that the jury in Judge 
Sloss's Court gave a verdict against Tom Williams 
for the dastardly and cowardly attack on Mr. Fred- 
erick Marriott. One month ago, after deliberating 
for a long time on the appeal made by Tom Williams, 
the same was denied by Judge Sloss, and the case is 
now to come before the Supreme Court. Williams, 
with the crafty cunning of the politician, born of the 
mishandling of public opinion in favor of the gam- 
bling game always going on in favor of race track 
gambling, has secured as his bondsmen William J. 
Dingee, the partner of William G. Henshaw, brother 
of Judge Henshaw of the Supreme Bench, and Adam 
Andrew, partner of Dan Burns, the Republican boss. 

These gentlemen are financially qualified, and for 
that reason could not be objected to appearing on 
Tom Williams's bond. The selection of these bonds- 
men is an indication of the small mentality of Tom 
Williams. He imagines that connections of this kind 
will give him some sort of influence over the high- 
minded gentlemen who compose the Supreme Court. 
It is generally conceded by all attorneys and by all 
others having any knowledge of the men comprising 
the Supreme Court, that the effort is puerile and an 
insult to Judge Beatty and his confreres. 



January 14, 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

MAYOR SCHMITZS APPOINTMENTS. 
Just what is meant l>> Mayoi 
menta to the « mmiaaionershipa that fell va- 

cant with the opening of the new year, i- DO 
clear. Presumably it ia for the public 

re-naming of ' 1 ia attributable to the 

family "pull" that got him his job in the first in- 
stance. Civil Service Commissioner lv>^ rs 

certain of re-appointment for reasons chiefly 
political, aiul because of the fact that lie appeal 
know mere, has more decent manners, and looks 
like a "strong arm" operator than the average admin- 
istrationist School Director Altmann, having mar- 
ried a near relative of Ruef, was also morally sure of 
another term of easy living. As for Wreden, ap- 
pointed to the Fire Commission, and Poheim, put on 
the Police Commission in place of J. R. Howell, the 
public is interested, not so much in why they were 
chosen, as in how they will regard their offices. Dr. 
Poheim has been in the public eye long enough in 
his Health Board capacity to make it seem probable 
that he will not look upon his position in the place 
where the graft is thickest and fattest as an excuse 
to turn reformer. He is expected, indeed, to con- 
sider the Hall of Justice no health resort. 

Thomas F. Egan and Edward H. Aigeltinger, for 
the Board of Public Works, are appointments that 
leave no doubt of the administration's intention to 
make this a busy year, with little "put in" and a 
great deal of "take out." Egan's brief hesitation 
about accepting his $4,000 a year office, because it 
was for only one year, instead of the long term, 
would have been amusing if there had been the 
slightest idea that he would let go of the job. Four 
thousand dollars a year is enough to buy for the city 
the services of a street-car filled with Egans. This 
addition to the Board of Works may be set down 
among the sins of Schmitz, as an instance where 
he chose without regard to competency or character; 
it reveals the Mayor in the act of putting thumb to 
nose and twiddling his fingers at decent citizenship. 
Of Aigeltinger, the case-hardened, conscienceless 
trafficker in the public's assets, much has been said 
of censure and denunciation, and doubtless there will 
be much to say hereafter. As long-term member of 
the most important of the municipal commissions, he 
will be in a way to prosper even more than he con- 
trived to do as a Supervisor. We have never ob- 
served Aigeltinger giving any of his accusers a chance 
to prove their charge in court. When he and a few 
others had so outraged public opinion that the Super- 
visors' chambers rang with cries of "hang them!" 
and when the men who did the shouting shook 
hempen nooses at the franchise-jugglers, Aigeltinger 
did nothing — could do nothing, in point of fact — but 
"lay low." 

The chief mystery in the re-organization of the 
commissions is the retirement from the Works Board 
of the Mayor's brother, Herbert Schmitz. Nobody 
ever knew a member of this talented family to let go 
of anything valuable until he was forced to it, or saw 
something more desirable within reach. It seems cer- 
tain, therefore, that the Mayor's brother boosted the 
Works Board brother out of the job, either because 
he feared him, or had quarreled with him, or that he 
coaxed him away from one place at the trough with 
promises of a better place farther along. It has been 
intimated that Brother Herbert is to have the secre- 
taryship of the Park Commission. If so, then he was 
boosted or booted out of the Works Board because 
brother Eugene could not trust him, or was unwilling 



NEWS LETTER. 3 

.ir any longer the odiui r the 

Park Commissi. .n is one city board that >•- not yel 
graft-tainted. Some theorize that the imily 

direct connection with the contra 
business than it h and that 

brother 1 lerhert ha 

I reasury from the outside while his relativi 

doing what they can inside. 



TRICKED BY CORNELIUS. 
The California State Federation of Labor lias been 

tricked and sold out to the man Cornelius, of the San 

Francisco Carmen's Union, and bis fellow conspira- 
tors against whatever is good and beneficial to work- 

ingmen. At the I ederation's annual meeting, a few 
days ago, these enemies of honest labor managed to 
pack the convention with their henchmen and dupes, 
and through them bad the Federation accept and in- 
dorse socialism as a dogma and doctrine of organized 
labor. The same infamous scheme was tried on the 
National Federation which met in San Francisco re- 
cently, but that gathering smashed the dastardly 
game. No one believes for a moment that the adop- 
tion of Cornelius's trickery by the State Association 
was secured by honest means. It was accomplished 
by bare-faced deception. Still, the Sailors' Union and 
a few others saw the purpose of Cornelius and pro- 
tested rigorously, but the convention had been too 
carefully packed for protests to avail anything. 

Now, the question is, What was Cornelius after 
and what did he accomplish ? He succeeded in driv- 
ing a wedge into labor unionism in California that 
will split it to its death if the honest and true and 
loyal unionists do not rescue the organization from 
the Cornelius gang of would-be politicians. In in- 
dorsing socialism, the Federation took labor union- 
ism out of the domain of its object and purpose, and 
transformed it into a clean-cut political organization 
with Cornelius and his co-conspirators ready to sell 
its votes to the highest bidder for cash. Yet there is 
a suspicion that Cornelius has political aspirations, 
and that his scheme was and is to use the Federation, 
and all subordinate unions, as a political influence to 
boost himself into a fat public office. In other words, 
Cornelius is scheming to destroy pure, true and hon- 
est labor unionism, and from its mangled remains 
raise up a political party for his own use, and for 
those who are his partners in the dastardly conspir- 
acy. About how low and corrupt and vile does one 
have to sink to betray and sell out honest, sober and 
deserving labor? 

Labor unions, members of the State Federation, 
now know of the scheme to turn them into a politi- 
cal machine for the benefit of these embodiments of 
perfidy, hypocrisy and falsehood. They now know 
that in indorsing socialism, they swung away from 
the fundamental principles of unionism and adopted 
a political code, dogma and declaration that invites 
the hostility of every business interest in California. 
It is no longer labor asking for better wages and 
shorter hours. It is organized labor trying to get 
control of the machinery of the official community 
that a few of their order may have free course to the 
public's treasury for their individual benefit. It is 
labor unions being played as fools by a little gang 
of bungling and dishonest politicians. If labor unions 
want that, they shall be known as political machines 
instead of organizations for the promotion of the 
good of their members, why, let them stand by Cor- 
nelius, but if they want the sympathy and good will 
of the public when they demand better conditions of 
existence, let them repudiate and cast out fellows of 
his brand and his purpose. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 14, 1905. 



HORSE RACING AND PRIZE-FIGHTS 
During the present session of the Legislature, some 
effort will be made to enact laws placing proper re- 
strictions on horse racing and prize fights, or abol- 
ishing them altogether. It is no exaggeration to as- 
sert that the race track and the prize-ring combined 
have done more harm to California than anything else 
allowed under our somewhat liberal laws. To either 
or both of these promoters of crime may be traced 
the beginnings of the criminal careers of over ninety 
per cent of the young men of this State, who are now- 
wearing convicts' stripes in felons' cells, or are fugi- 
tives from justice. Time was when the race track 
possessed some redeeming features. It was sup- 
posed, at least, that the recognition given by the 
State itself to the district agricultural fairs would 
do something to promote horse-breeding in Califor- 
nia. Years ago, at the beginning, this desirable re- 
sult was accomplished, and the State gained a name 
for fine horseflesh. But of late years, the agricultural 
fairs seem to have been run in the interests of the 
gamblers, just as the local tracks are. As for prize- 
fighting, it never had one redeeming feature. It 
should never have been permitted, and now that it 
has become notorious as a species of public robbery, 
it should be suppressed. 

It is reported that the State has paid $22,000 for 
82 acres of land, outside of Sacramento, to be used as 
a site for a new race track for the races of the State 
Agricultural Fair. The Legislature will be asked to 
make large appropriations to place grand-stands, a 
club-house and other buildings on the track, and to 
make an increased appropriation for the Fair. These 
proposed appropriations are not worthy of the sup- 
port of the honest members of the Legislature. The 
State Agricultural Fair is a fraud, so far as any prac- 
tical benefit it may confer upon the State is con- 
cerned. The District Agricultural Fairs are frauds 
in the same particular. The money spent upon them 
is money thrown away. It could be much better 
expended in a score of other ways, failing which, it 
would be better for the State to keep it stored in the 
treasury rather than to spread it out over a series 
of fake fairs. The State agricultural Fair is simply a 
horse-racing game, subsidized by the State, given the 
benefit of State grounds, the State name, and con- 
ducted by State officers. The entire enthusiasm and 
energy of the fair and its conductors center around 
the race track. The money of the State is spent so 
that race track gamblers may be made comfortable 
the while they fleece the public. At the same time, 
the schools of the State, and particularly the Normal 
School of this city, a distinctively State institution, 
is suffering from lack of proper accommodations for 
its pupils. If such a building were dumped on the 
State Fair Grounds, and the horsemen were told to 
stall their horses in it, they would become indignant 
and go away. And if the race horses were taken away 
there would be no State Fair. Why, for years the 
posters advertising the State Fairs always bore the 
figure of a race horse, and displayed as the chief at- 
traction the races at Sacramento. Now, we have no 
quarrel with honest horsemen, and no objection to 
honest horse races, but we do object, and will con- 
tinue to object vigorously, to the combination of 
pea-shooters, short-card men, dope ringers, and other 
all-around robbers, who always manage to get the 
inside track at the State Fair, and who always suc- 
ceed in robbing the public. If it be impossible to 
prohibit pool selling on the grounds of the State Fair, 
where the races occur, or on any grounds where fairs, 
aided by the State, are given, then let the Governor 
investigate the entire question of agricultural fairs, 



with a view to their suppression. As they exist to- 
day, instead of being beneficial, they are detrimental 
to the State. 

Senator Ralston proposes introducing a bill which. 
if it become a law, should do much to raise this State 
in the estimation of the rest of the country. 

Senator Ralston proposes to bar professional fights 
of all kinds, and to restrict sparring exhibitions to 
bouts of four rounds, under the rules of the American 
Amateur Union. These rules provide that eight- 
ounce gloves shall be used; that no admission fee 
shall be charged, and that trophies and not money 
shall be the reward of the contestants. Such a bill 
should receive the suport of every member of the 
Legislature who has any appreciation whatever of 
the dignity and importance of his position, and of 
his duty to the State. The prize-fighters and all their 
kind should be driven out. 



SUPERFLUOUS BRITISH WOMEN. 

There must be an embarrassment of feminine 
riches in the tight little island, if we are to judge by 
the efforts which are made from time to time to rid 
itself of a portion of its femininity. Not long ago 
there was a perfect craze for sending English women 
out to South Africa ; now Canada is suggested as a 
dumping-ground for the overplus. In both cases, 
high grounds of State were urged. The women were 
to serve as patriotic propagandists in both cases, 
but it is only just to say that they were expected -in 
the first place to propagate what they were after- 
wards to propagand. In fact, the problem perplexing 
the British maid appears to be not patriotism, but 
matrimony. 



When the United States Senator from Missouri 
was in Congress, he introduced a bill with "Mr. 
Speaker and Gents." He knows better now; beside-. 
his fame as a setter-up of dinners covers all little 
Streaks of ismorance. 



Stoessel's friends say the reason why he surren- 
dered was because the three years' of ammunition 
and supplies that were supposed to be in Port Arthur 
were stolen before they got out of Russia. 



FAT FOLKS 

I reduced my weight seventy pounds, bust six Inches, waist 
six Inches, and hips fourteen Inches in a short time by a guar- 
anteed harmless remedy, without exercise or starving. I will 
tell vou all about it. Enclose stamp. Address MRS. E. R. RICH- 
ARDS. 225 EAST NINTH ST., RIVERSIDE. CALIFORNIA. 




KCHAS. KLILLS & CO Jf 

&£XCL USIVT& 

HIGH GRADE. CLOTHIERS 



make good 
make ours. 



Half a century of "Knowing how to 
clothes" is the pedigree of makers who 
This goodness and worth is in every model shown 
here. Our tailoring service is thorough. You can 
depend upon being fitted here correctly. 



1 



'<53 



■^—y 






January 14. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Sutt, :ld morality, 

'■ > 1 1 vr - 

• harm 
showing, 
That all tin- world may stand aghast 

wonder whai is doing, 
' >r in ing in 

' >r Satan mischief brewing. 

Laws against the race track 

And laws on child employment, 

Laws to make US work the 
And laws to give enjoyment. 

Laws to pay tin.' iurors more. 
And the suffering educator, 
And laws to give more money 
To the Struggling Legislator. 
It i~ claimed in a local suit that hypnotism was 
employed to obtain over eighteen thousand dollars 
from the plaintiffs. In other cases in which hypno- 
tism has been charged are any criterion. 1 should say 
that the thing is caused by the stupidity of the plain- 
tiffs. There seems to be an inherent connection be- 
tween fools and hypnotism. 

Two Santa Cruz Attorneys are prepared to im- 
peach the Superior Judge of that salubrious resort 
before the Legislature. They seem to have plenty of 
grievances, but I would not mind betting a new hat 
that the judge in question will never be impeached. 
^ e are SO cver-lastingly afraid of hurting any one's 
feelings to do anything so hard. 

Judge Lawlor actually worked himself up to the 
point of calling a counsel contumacious the other 
day. I )ear me! This is most unexpected behavior on 
the part of the Bench. If it keep up, we shall prob- 
ably have a well-disciplined Bar, and then who would 
know San Francisco? 

The Sanitary Reduction Works says that it burns 
all the garbage in the municipality. How can they 
maintain that while the present municipal Govern- 
ment holds office. There is lots of garbage which is 
reserved for future burning, but it flourishes at pres- 
ent. 

Among the measures proposed at Sacramento is 
one to increase the pay of jurors to three dollars a 
day. The ordinary juror is worth nothing, and any 
increase in his pay should be strongly opposed. To 
make the pay of a juror as high as that of a hod- 
carrier is ridiculous. 

If it were anybody but Judge Cabaniss, one would 
feel inclined to laugh at his virtuous indignation over 
the receipt of a present of fifty dollars, but the judge 
in question is so absolutely above suspicion that one 
feels a little sorry that he should have made a fuss. 
As a rule, only the dishonest are sentimental. 

People are seldom anxious to have the care of a 
child which is not their own, but in the case of an 
infant heir, who has plenty of money for his own 
maintenance, matters, strangely enough, are differ- 
ent, as may be seen in the matter of the young son 
of Butler Smith. 

It is easy to see that we are in for a lot of hysteri- 
cal bosh in relation to the boycotting of the Trust 
cigars. It is ultimately a question as to which is the 
stronger. Experience must have taught both par- 
ties that it is impossible to expect to maintain the 
public interest in such a question. 



Civilization makes new .rimes. Under no other 
conditions would it have been possible to maki 

self a scoundrel by throwing sand into a cylinder- 
head. It i> to be hope, I that tin- novelty of the crime 
will introduce a novel zeal into the judge who tries 
the miscreant. 

The meanest man I have heard of for some time is 
U . W. pushing, who ask> lor annullmcnt of his mar- 
riage with a divorced woman on the ground that the 

statutory year had nol elapsed prior to his marriage 

with her. 

They are saying now that the provision for the 
new District Courts of Appeal is an urgency matter. 
'I he appointment of the judge is also an urgency 
matter, and the delay reflects no credit on the Gov- 
ernor. 

The gibes which Dickens threw at the druggists 
would seem to apply to this town. The examinations 
for pharmaceutical chemist are dishonest and even 
ridiculous, and the health of the public is endangered 
by incompetent handlers of drugs. 

The Secretaryship to the Superior Judges in this 
city is a little piece of graft which should be looked 
into. Ever since the all-glorious Coffroth held the 
position, the discretion of our Solomons has been at 
least doubtful. 

Gaudy electric signs and all sorts of advertising 
matter are coming down with great rapidity under the 
supervision of Mayor Olney in Oakland. The Mayor 
has evidently found his vocation ; he is one of the best 
housemaids we have had in Californian history. 

A couple of estimable gentlemen who were looking 
for an opportunity to blow up a safe, have been 
wandering about the country with nine sticks of dyna- 
mite in their pockets. This is making the right to 
carry arms ridiculous. 

Professor Lawson says that the earthquakes are 
caused by the sinking of the Bay region. Sink! I 
should think so. How could the poor thing do any- 
thing else under the loaa of the present city adminia 
tration? 

The Yorke Company will not go on with the re- 
pairing of the bituminous streets. Judging by the 
up-to-the-present results of their activities, I should 
say that it is just as well for the streets. 

Colonel Irish has come forward as an eloquent ex- 
ponent of the beauties of nature. It is really remark- 
able how men are naturally attracted by their oppo- 
sites. 

The raisin growers are forming a strong combina- 
tion. What between these organizations of growers 
and dealers we shall soon hardly be able to call our 
souls our own. 

Oakland's City Council has declared for a munici- 
pal plant, just as it is going out of office. It is so 
like Oakland. Now the Mayor will be happily re- 
lieved of the necessity of doing anything. 

The Eagles and the Water Front Federation both 
oppose the recession of the Yosemite Valley. It is 
difficult to see the point of agreement between the . 
two organizations, but harmony is always accept- 
able. 

At last the Olympic Club is taking note of the ama- 
teur question. It is none too soon, for there are few 
places where amateurism is on less sound founda- 
tions than here. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 
On Deck 



January 14, 1905. 



"How long did the Captain say it would be be- 
fore " 

"He gave us twenty minutes in which to make our 
peac; with this world." His tone was frivolous; not 
so his eyes as he gazed into hers — gravely, deeply, 
tenderly. 

Her laugh was a bit hysterical, but she met his look 
bravely. 

"This is quite like a scene on the stage," he said, 
after a pause. "This strange half-light; the people 
huddled together over there, frightened into silence ; 
the Captain's sharp orders. God ! Hear that mother 
pray!" He ground his teeth together savagely. 

"Yes," she said quietly, "it's not real; it's all a 
dream. I've dreamed it before many a time — all but 
you; you were never here. I was alone — always 
alone." A shudder went through her slender body. 

"You'll never be alone again — in this life or the 
next. Doesn't that comfort you?" he asked, drawing 
her hand close against his breast. 

"Yes," she sighed happily. "Are you glad I told 
you?" She glanced at him shyly. 

"Glad! This is more than I ever hoped for— than 
I ever dared to dream of. Who would not give his 
life gladly, joyfully, for such happiness as this, even 
though its time is numbered by heart-beats?" 

She drew a long, sobbing breath. "You know that 
after this I could never go back to him — never. I 
belong to you now — and afterward. Nothing can al- 
ter that." 

"No, nothing, thank Goa ! ' he said slowly, and was 
silent. 

"That first time," she asked, breaking the silence. 
"Are you sure you cared — then?" 

"Sure"?" he echoed. "Why, I stood there bored 
to death, waiting till I could get away decently. I 
was wondering what all their talk about love meant. 
Love — I had never felt it. Then — I opened my eyes, 
and there you stood." She uttered a soft little excla- 
mation of delight. 

"You were so perfect — so utterly the desire of one's 
heart. It was not your beauty, though, that touched 
me. It was the soul of you looking out of those great 
eyes. You looked so small and childlike, my heart 
gave a great leap and fell back. I wondered if you 
saw me tremble." 

"Dearest," she murmured lovingly, slipping her 
cold fingers closer into his warm ones. 

"And you?" he asked eagerly. 

"I think I always loved you — even before that," 
she said softly. "I had dreamed and dreamed of you, 
and I knew you as soon as I saw you. Your face 
seemed familiar, some way. I felt such a happiness 
steal over me as we talked." 

"We have had many bitter hours, but the memory 
of that one stands out like a jewel from them all, 
doesn't it?" he asked. 

"Yes, yes," she whispered. 

"And to end like this," he groaned suddenly, his 
head sunk on his breast. She was quick with comfort. 

"Like this! How better? Together and — under- 
standing." 

"You are right, brave little heart," he replied, 
ashamed of his weakness. "It was you — the thought 
of your bright beauty hidden down there. Forgive 
me?" 

"How better?" she repeated, shuddering and draw- 
ing closer to him. "Let me tell you. I prayed for 
hours last night — I, who have not prayed for years, 
who have not dared to pray, that God would save me 
from him — in some way — in His own way — and this," 



she threw out her hands in a sudden gesture, "this is 
His answer." 

"Poor child," he murmured. "Poor, helpless little 
child." He spoke very tenderly. 

"It will not be very hard," she asked, "nor long?" 
There was a piteous break in her voice. 

"No, no," he said ; "not in my arms, please God," 
and she smiled trustfully, with her head against his 
shoulder, reassured like a child. 

"I don't understand," she said, wonderingly, "how 
you came to know I was sailing on this boat. I only 
made up my mind at the last second." 

He smiled sadly. "I didn't know," he said. "I 
meant to get away from you. You were growing so 
worn, and I knew I was the cause, so I came on board 
late and sent a letter to your hotel. I knew you 
would understand." 

"Why, Jack," she cried. "That is exactly what I 
did. How strange." 

"Yes, it's strange, all right. Fate has her way with 
us. We are pretty helpless in her hands, after all." 

"How glad I was. I was longing so to see you once 
more and wishing I had stayed." 

There were a few broken words — low, murmuring 
— then silence. 

"After all, this is the only way," she said suddenly. 

"Yes, it is the only way; you could not go back — 
to him." 

"I knew that. I felt it all through," she said, eager- 
lv. "I was sure something would happen — sure of 
it — and I hoped for it so." 

"Once," he said slowlv, "I thought of suicide. I 
tried to ask you if you would be strong enough to 
die with me — then I knew I was insane — to think of 
that — to dare." 

"Oh, Jack," she sobbed, "I longed for you to ask 
me — I longed for it. It couldn't have been so very 
wicked, since God has granted us our desire," she 
idded, after a pause. 

He laughed, then kissed her hand softly. By the 
light of the creeping flames he could see the sweetness 
of her eyes, all for him. He looked long into their 
depths. 

"They are coming — coming," he whispered tender- 




ffarMc^™™wmr^cm<sm 



HELLER & FRANK 

INCORPORATED 

CLOTHIERS 

$15.00 

They were late in transit- 
about seventy-five single 
and double-breasted Sack 
Suits all sizes were to sell tor 
122 50 and $25. now marked 
Wleen dollars, to make room 
for sprlne models, about to 
arrive. 

MARKET STREET 
AND GRANT AVENUE 




January 14. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ready ft>r our bridal?" 
She sobbed a little. 

"It is so dark down there — so dark," she said pite- 
otisly. 

n't be frightened, little child," he murmured. 
"Now put your arms around my neck and cling — 
cling fast.'' 

"Why, I can feel your heart beat," she cried. 
"Yes, yes: put your face to mine, dear heart. Our 
tir-t kiss." He laughed softly, happily, tremulously. 
"There, don't be afraid, love. Give me your lips — 
Grace G. Bostwick in Broadway Magazine. 



Library Table 



In "Fata Morgana," Dy Andre Castaigne, there 
seems to be little or no purpose or motif pervading 
the book. There are quite a few superfluous charac- 
ters marshalled in for a while, and then quietly 
dropped. One can receive a fair idea of the Quartier 
Latin of Paris by reading it, but that is about all. 

One wonders a little that at the very finis, Ethel 
Rowrer should have called Phil Longwill a "Man" 
with a capital "M." He had perhaps proved himself 
impervious to temptation of a gross character, but 
certainly through it all he appears to be of a fickle 
mind, and his treatment of Helia, one of the loveliest 
and noblest of women, cannot be called anything but 
cruel to say the least. He doubts her, with little or 
no foundation for his doubt, and with no effort to 
find out whether she deserves it or not. And at the 
very end, when it is too late for poor Helia to really 
derive any benefit from it, he apparently realizes her 
devotion to him, and magnanimously promises many 
things that he knows he will never be called upon to 
carry out. Whereupon Miss Rowrer calls him a 
"Man." 

"Fata Morgana," by Andre Castaigne. Century 
Company, publishers. Price $1.50. 

There is strength and virility concentrated in Kath- 
erine Cecil Thurston's book, "The Masqueraders," 
that one seldom finds in the trashy novels of the day. 
Her masterful portrayal of the characters of Loder, 
Chilcote and "Eve" leaves nothing to be desired. Her 
description of Loder's speech in the House impresses 
one as coming from the pen of a man, rather than a 
woman, and a man who thoroughly knew the ground 
he was treading on at that. The force and passion of 
the love between Loder and Eve render convention- 
alitv, even law, pale, crushed things, too inane to be 
considered. 

"The Masqueraders," by Katherine Cecil Thurston. 
Harpers, Publishers. Price, $1.50. 

The perpetual calendar issued by the Continental 
Building and Loan Association is one of the neatest 
calendars which have come to the editor's desk. This 
association is as perpetual as the calendar. 



Wedding Invitations. 

We give special attention to prevailing forms and 
engrave visiting cards, wedding invitations and an- 
nouncements, correctly and reasonably. Monogram, 
crests and address dies made to order. C. E. 
Goldsmith, the engraver, is now with us, which in- 
sures a continuance of the very best work that the en- 
graver's art can produce. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 
Market street. 



John W. Carmany, Chronicle Building, makes 
shirts to order. They are the best to be had for the 
money. 



SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
We desire to announce an unusual discount sale of 

CHINA, 
ART GOODS, 
CUT GLASS, 
KITCHEN WARE, Etc. 
to begin MONDAY, JANUARY 16th, 1905 



NATHAN-DOHRMANN CO. 
122-132 Sutter Street. San Francisco 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1934. a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and one-quarter <3M) per cent per 
annum on all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after 
Tuesday, January 3, 1905. 



Office— 710 Market Street. 



GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Continental Building and Loan Association. 

, H £ S d^'ared a dividend for the six months ending December 31 
1304, of five per cent per annum on ordinary deposits, six per 
cent on term deposits, and seven per cent on class "F" install- 

S™ 1 &?J&t»t o . DR ' WASHINGTON DODGE, President. 
WM. CORBIN, Secretary. 
Office— 301 California St. - 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending December 31, 1904, dividends have 
been declared on the deposits in the savings department of this 
company as follows: On term deposits, at the rate of 3 6-10 per 
cent per annum, and on ordinary deposits at the rate of 3 per 
cent per annum, free of taxes, and payable on and after Tuesdav 
January 3, 1905. 

J. DADZELL BROWN, Manager. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 

For the half year ending December 31st. 1904. has declared a dividend 
on deposits at the rate of three and one-quarter (Sin percent per 
annum, free of taxes, payable on and after Tuesday. January 3rd 1906 

626 Market street, opp Palace Hotel. 



W. E. PALMER. Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 

For half year ending December 31, 1904, dividends upon all deposits 
at the rate of three and one-quarter ( 3% ) per cent per an- 
num, free of taxes, will be payable on and after January 3. 1906 
,„ n „ . ■. „.„ . nj . FEED W. BAY. Secretary. 

222 Montgomery St., Mills building. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

has declared a dividend for the term ending December 31. 1904 at 
the rate of three and one-quarter ( 3% ) per cent per annum on all 
deposits, free of taxes and payable on and after January 2. 1905 
,„, „ . . _„ CYRUS W. OABMANY. Cashier. 

101 Montgomery St., cor. Sutter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held 
this day. a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one-half 
13%) per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending 
December 31, 1904, free from all taxes, and payable on and after Janu- 
ary 3. 1905 t „., wl ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Office— Cor. Market, McAllister and Jones sts., San Francisco. De- 
cember. 28. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Pastille 

Have you ever sought her? A bright, elusive, 
flame-like creature, luring you on, only to flit away 
again, as light as thistle-down blown over the sum- 
mer fields, yet with the magnetism of the universe 
centered in her wraith-like being. 

How many forms she invests, this fay of our imagi 
nation ! Sometimes the mystery of centuries of 
thought veiled in her great eyes; the half-promise 
lurking on her parted lips of the solving of your life's 
questionings, and you draw closer to her, dazed in 
anticipation of what is to come : Is it all to be answer- 
ed by one small word? Just the warm clinging of an- 
other's lips? The consciousness of another soul at- 
tuned to yours? Is what you desire almost within 
your grasp? Have you but to reach out your hand? 
Pouff! Clutched in your hot palm lies a handful of 
withered leaves — ashes of roses! 

Sometimes she comes to you before dawn — gray, 
wintry dawn, when your blood beats sluggishly and 
your mind is benumbed with dreams that have for 
the while plunged you in soul-travail. And she creeps 
to your side and nestles near you and whispers allur- 
ing phantasies into your willing ears. 

Some great, strange thing is going to happen — 
wonderfully beautiful because of its vagueness, its 
unreality. Happiness will be yours — Fame — Power 
— the world is at your feet! And you will take it — 
you will drink it like a glass of wine to the very 
lees; you will squeeze it, as you would a sponge, 
until there is no drop left to tantalize. Within you 
throbs part of the motive impetus that governs the 
spheres! Life! You are drunk with it! 

And then — a brighter yellow glow over the gray 
house-tops, a faint "cheep" of wakened sparrow in 
the gaunt trees near your window, followed by a cho- 
rus of the whole brood — voices below in the street, 
the rattle of wheels over the cobble-stones. God ! 
only another day ! 

There in the noon-time mart of the city streets, 
amid the hurry, hurry, hurry of the drab-faced throng 
of human automatons, is still your Fairy, a strange 
little figure now, with the gleam of cunning and ava- 
rice in her hunted eyes, her figure tense with the 
nerve-racking force of an earthly aim driving her on. 
Money! Her thin fingers are curled to receive it, 
at the price of health, beauty, true living. Money! 
to buy a position among those who are nothing to 
you, and to whom you are less than nothing! Money! 
Every desire, ambition, passion of this mad little 
planet symbolized in a tiny shining sliver of metal! 
And once attained? The worms can find their way 
as easily through the silver-embossed casket to the 
food they have claimed their own since Time began, 
as into the plain pine box of the pauper! 

By some she is called one name, by some another. 
She appears to each in different guise, and yet is 
ever the same— a bright, elusive, flame-like creature, 
luring you on— only to flit away again— as light as 
thistle-down blown over the summer fields! 

— Eleanore F. Lewys. 

Halt the pleasure in life is anticipation. Drink 
Hotaling's OLD KIRK, and reflect on the other half 
what you have missed. The best on the market. 



January 14, 1905. 



Draperies, portieres, and the many other fabrics 
used in the home., may be obtained from Geo. T. 
Marsh & Co., 214 Post street. 



Testa Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factorv 
for $7.50 per ton: half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Use Briquettes for 
cooking and heating, and you will save at least one-third on vour 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 





' 






WIDELY 
MITATED BUT NEVER EQUALLEI 

THE GENUINE 


\ 








Murray SLanman's 

Florida Water 




















IHj 


The Perfume of Perfumes. 

REFRESHING, DELIGHTFUL. 

Without exception the best 
Toilet Water In the World. 

ASK YOTJB DBUQGI8T FOR 

MURRAY & LANMAN'S 






■■ 




AND BEE THAT TOD GET IT. 


J 





WM. A. FAGAN 



P. DECKER. 



DECKER-FAGAN CO. 

Electrical Contractors 

Estimates Furnished on All 
Classes of Wiring. Repair Work 
a Specialty : : : : 

185 JESSIE ST., Near Third 

Phone Main 3118 



Agents 
FAGAN DOOR OPENER CO. 



SAN FRANCICSO 




MISS LOUSE MANNING. Mioiger 

MRS. CLARICE COHEN, President 



House and Church Wed 
dings. 

Receptions, Luncheons, 
Dinners, and Funerals. 

Supply and care of flowers 
for offices. 

Choicest cut flowers. 



246 StocKton St. 

Corner Post 
TELEPHONE MAIN 847 



"SABi 1 " 



EP1CURIAN RESTAURANT 

323 LA'RK.IJW STREET 



"6he James H. Babcock Catering Co. 

409 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



REMOVAL NOTICE 



PATRICK & CO.. have moved to their new 
quarters ill-US SANSOME STREET, where a 
complete line of Rubber Stamps, Stencil*. Seals, 
Metal Checks. Box Brands, etc.. can be found. 



NEWTON J. THARP 



ARCHITECT 



131 Post Street. 



San Francisco. 



January 14, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 





Edna Wallace Hopper, who will appear at the Co- 
lumbia Theatre next week in "A Country Mouse." 

sk * * 

Frederick Warde turned a particularly neat speech 
on Tuesday night, and if it cut a bit, the cutting 
will do the people no harm. After repeated calls in 
the third act, he said : "I had no idea so much applause 
could come from so small an audience." He added, 
very prettily, that the applause, so genuine, was felt 
all the more deeply by Miss Kidder and himself, and 
on behalf of them both he thanked them most heartily 
for their warm appreciation. 

One may find faults in Stanislaus Stange's new 
play, "Salammbo," its drawn-outness, for instance, its 
continued tragedy, without one ray of light, which, 
remembering the age in which it is set, makes it diffi- 
cult of appreciation ; but with the acting thereof — 
no ! That is very secure, very sound, very efficient. 
The first act of "Salammbo" is dreariness personified, 
but from that act on, the players force the play to 
grow on you. The Salammbo of Miss Kidder I found 
at many times lacking in warmth, but never color- 
less. She brings to bear the great knowledge of her 
art, and it must be made plain that trying to make 
other people understand the inner workings of a play 
of this kind is quite up-hill work. "Salammbo" is 
one continual tragedy, and the only delicately light 
shadows for Miss Kidder are her meeting of her little 
brother, Hannibal, for the first time and for a few 
minutes only, when she realizes her love for Matho. 



h is impossible to unbend under such circumstaj 
under such tension. 

I'lie Matho of Mr. Warde is a Strong, true and .tu 

dingly realistic presentation. The yieldin] 
the sacred veil to Salammlio, who has come to seek 
it in his tent at night, and gain it in exchange for her 
honor, if necessary. The torture to him when she 
tells him she hates him, the gradual recovers 
eventual magnanimity of the "chief of the Libyan 
mercenaries, as he places the veil on her arms and 
bids her go, is all strong, true and virile. 

So, to come back to Mr. Warde's speech and the 
knot that he had at the end of his whip, I am con- 
vinced that we deserve it. Vaudeville, comedies and 
the comedy-tragedies of the present day we all like. 
I suppose, but a great lesson can be learned from the 
tragedies of the past, and it's a good idea sometimes 
to lay the frivolities of the present aside for an hour 
or two, and mark, learn and inwardly digest the pre- 
sentation of a time gone by — by capable people. 
* * * 

I can remember Herschel Mayall in his salad days, 
way back in Minnesota, taking the part of a minstrel 
for the benefit of a church circle, which desired to 
clothe poor little Ethiopians with the benefits from 
Mayall's art. But that was before this gentleman 
became "the darling of the gods." His following was 
there in minstrelsy, as it is in melodrama, and it 
watched his every movement, and gave him, as usual, 
its fond and indulgent approval. Knowing the par- 
ticipants as the Central public does, it took great 
pleasure in its encores. The parts were excruciating- 
ly funny because it was the Central company, and 
because all the individuals, even to the mule "Maud,'' 
were known, and intimately. It was like the old days 
of amateur minstrelsy. Myrtle Vane and Ben T. 
Dillon deserve special mention. 




Myrtle Vane, one of the charming actresses at the 
Central Theatre. 

* * * 

When Will M. Cressy wrote "Town Hall To- 
night," he wrote a little gold mine. It's the best and 
the funniest that the Orpheum ever has had on its 
boards. Mr. Cressy takes the part, and oh, Lord ! 
how he looks it, of janitor, manager, stage manager, 
stage carpenter and goodness knows what else of the 
Town Hall in a side-tracked country town. I am not 
going to attempt to give you the story of the skit, 
but I'll give you just one of the witticisms. The 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 14, 1905. 



leading lady of "The Elite Repertoire Company" ar- 
rives at the theatre to see her dressing room and to 
unpack her trunk. During the conversation that en- 
sues, she asks Flitters about the hotel. He tells her 
it burned down the night before. "Where am I to 
sleep," she asks. "I dunno," says Flitters, thought- 
fully; "you might sleep with the ticket agent." "Sir," 
answers Blanche Dayne, "I wish you to understand 
that I am a perfect lady." "So is the ticket agent," 
Flitters replies. Miss Dayne is a splendid foil for 
Cressy, and the skit works like a charm. 

H. V. Fitzgerald, a lightning change artist, is re- 
markably clever, and has got away from the old rapid 
change proposition, and presents entirely new ideas, 
and Chassino, the shadowgraphist, is the only man 
I ever saw work with his feet and hands. Eleanor 
Falke took the house the afternoon I was there. She 
is a dainty little lady, with quite an agreeable voice 
and some pretty songs. 




Ruth Allen, a favorite of the Alcazar Stock Co. 

"Lost River" is being played at the Alcazar this 
week. It is about as different as chalk from cheese, 
from "Old Heidelberg," which went before it. There 
were vim and life in that play, but in "Lost River" 
the players, with few exceptions, played listlessly. 
Miss Lawrence made a fairly efficient Ora, but she 
was not the Miss Lawrence I am accustomed to see 
and listen to. John Craig was ill at ease as Robert 
Blessing, but as I think I have said before, this 
kind of part and plays does not seem to suit him. 
He is adaptable enough, but his best work is not 
there. However, it's an ill wind that blows nobody 
good. "Lost River" brought out Ruth Allen as 
Gladys at her very best. She is the lady villain of the 
play, and she acted it very well, without overdoing. 
She is a very tall, good-looking girl, and in her riding 
habit, looked very handsome. Miss Christie Mac- 
Lean, as Grandma Gates, gave a very clever piece of 
acting, and our old friend, Hilliard, was doing nicely, 
till, in starting the bung of a barrel of beer, they let 
off enough gun-powder to fill the house with an evil 



smell, and Hilliard's lungs with gunpowder smoke 
that kept him coughing the balance of the evening. 

"Lost River" will never set itself afire. 

* * * 

Wednesday night last was a gala night at the Tiv- 
oli. The grand opera company, direct from Italy, 
which has been playing at the Teatro Nationale of the 
City of Mexico, had only just arrived from that point 
that very morning, yet at eight o'clock that evening 
they were ready to present "Rigoletto." The Tivoli 
was literally packed, from orchestra to gallery, 
packed with enthusiastic lovers of song and music, 
and the genuine applause they gave as the special 
numbers appealed to them must have been very pleas- 
ing to the ears of the tired artists. 

They deserved it all. In Signorina Tetrazzini the 
Tivoli has a magnificent colorature singer. Her voice 
is not large, but it is most beautifully pure, and her 
high notes are bird-like in their purity of tone. Last 
night, by the time Tetrazzini had sung "Caro norae," 
the house was at her feet, and she generously sang it 
twice. In Gelda's duet with her father, Rigoletto, 
in the third act, her wonderful voice brought the 
house to its feet, and the encore was again accepted. 

Bazelli, who played the Duke, is a tenor of no mean 
capacity, and Romboli, in the name part, is both an 
actor and a singer. 

Too much credit cannot be given to the Musicai 
Director, Giorgio Pollacco, who held the baton over 
a strange orchestra, and governed it with a master 
hand. It was a night to be remembered, and to Tet- 
razzini fell the honors. 

* * * 

Madame Gadski has been enjoying one of the great 
triumphs that rarely come in the life of an artiste. 
It is the triumph of quiet renown, added to a recog- 
nition of great personal worth. The wonderful so- 
prano of the lady has been heard many times of late 
in San Francisco, and all society has hastened to 
fete her. The season at the Alhambra has been one 
continual success, and it must be a satisfaction to 
the management to note thp growing appreciation 
of the public for things musical. 




Miss Beatrice Golden, who will appear at the Grand" 
Opera House next week in "The Silver Slipper." 

* * :;= 

To-morrow (Sunday) matinee will witness, at the 
Grand Opera House, the "second edition" of Mr. John 
C. Fisher's musical production, "The Silver Slipper," 



January 14, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



being in ii iperiority, tin 

musical ■ liat i\cr ,i|>| 

a production I 
wiih novelty ii lances, music, etc., while the 

lighl effects have been vastly impi 
11"- iri>m the capitals will be on view 

in 1 lie Silver Slipper," and worn l>\ girls who will 
liM>k as though they wire born in them. 
» * * 

1 MR- oi the most brilliant society ami charity affairs 
of the season will be the matinee performance >>f the 
Henry Arthur Jones play, "the Liars." at the Colum- 
bia Theatre on Thursday, January 26th. The affair 
be given as a benefit in aid <>t the Naval C'lul> of 
Vallejo, and a number of prominent society women 1 t 

this Mate are interested in making a success of the 
matinee. The Naval Club should net a very tidy sum 
from this benefit, at which will appear in various 
rules of the brilliant comedy such well-known people 
as 1 : r. J. Wilson Shiels, Ll^yd Lowndes, H. M. 
Spencer. Thomas Eastland, Courtney Ford, Royden 
Williamson, Miss Frances Jolliffe, .Mrs. Mark 
Gerstle, Mrs. J. Wilson Shiels, Miss Olga Atherton 
and Mrs. II. M. Spencer. Active rehearsals of the 
piece lave been in progress for some days past, and 
an unusually clever performance is looked for. Seats 
for the Benefit will be on sale at the box-office of the 
Columbia commencing Tuesday. January 24th. 

* * * 

The concert tour in which Mine. Melba is now 
engaged has been planned by Manager Charles A. 
Ellis to include two appearances in this city, and the 
return of this great artist after an extended absence 
from San Francisco will be a welcome event to a 
large music-loving public. Mine. Melba is now mak- 
ing the longest concert tour ever planned for her by 
Manager Charles A. Ellis, who has had charge of her 
affairs in America for the past ten years. She began 
her tour shortly after her return to America in No- 
vember, and it is to extend into the Northwest and 
down the Pacific Coast, although but two cities in 
California have been booked. San Francisco and Los 
Angeles will be the two places at which Melba will 
be heard. The advance sale of seats begins the pre- 
vious Thursday at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s music 
store. 

* * * 

William Collier, in "The Dictator," follows Edna 
Wallace Hopper at the Columbia Theatre. 

The final performance of "Salammbo," by the 
Warde-Kidder combination will be given at the Co- 
lumbia Theatre on Sunday night. 

* * * 

The ten Nelsons, unquestionably the greatest acro- 
batic family before the public, will make their first 
appearance in nearly three years at the Orpheum, 
Sunday afternoon. From the grandfather, Robert 
Nelson, down to tiny Helda, the youngest and dainti- 
est of the troupe, three generations of brawn, agility, 
daring and muscle are in evidence. The Musical 
Avolos, two ladies and two gentlemen, will make 
their initial appearance in this city. Clifford and 
Burke, eccentric comedians, one appearing in black- 
face and the other finished in a delicate saddle-color, 
will also be new here. Will M. Cressy and Blanche 
Dayne will present another of their inimitable 
sketches, entitled "The New Depot." Eleanor Falke, 
singing and dancing comedienne, will be heard in an 
entire change of songs, and Chassino, the European 
shadowgrapher, who produces extraordinary effects 
with his bare hands and feet, promises new surprises. 

(Continued to Page 22.) 



Central Theatre 

A WORKING GIRLS WRONGS 

A thrlllli.it Into thlilllDBl] 

In preparation. tin .ill biblleal plan 

"Jerusalem, the li"ly oltj " Bpsol 

production. 

Prices avenl 1 



Tivoli Opera Mouse. lVr " 6rK "iJ^;; 1 street . 

GRAND OPERfq 
in ii 
Reserved seats now on salt. Prices, *->. H.so, ii, 
ltepertolre: Prldaj evening, Jan. 13th. "Barber of Seville." 

Saturday Math LaTosca." Saturday evening "Jijgolelto." 

Sundas evemug, Oavalleria Bustfcana" and TPaglluccI 
Nazi week, continuation of the same eompaoj In a repertoire 
ol nigh class grand opera. 

Orders by mail, aoeompanled by check or 1 iey older Bill 

receive attention In Hie orderln which Ihey are received. 



Grand Opera House 

•2 weeks only. Beginning tomorrow Sunday Matin.-.-, 
John C. Fisher's stupendous $€0,000 prudueiion. 

THE SILVER SLIPPER 

By the authors ot "Florodora" 

Direct from its marvelous <s months' run at the Broadway Thea- 
tre. New York. Matinee Saturday. 
Popular prices: 25c, 500, 7r>c. $1. 
Ooming-.T. H. Stoddart and Eeuben Fax in 

TrjE BONNIE B RIER BUSH 

A\c.P\7P\r Thpntm „ Belasco & Mateb, Proprietors 
rtlOdZ-clI tlieUtre E. D. Pkicb. GenT Her. Tel.Alcazar 
Oue week commencing Monday January 16, 
Kegular matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

The Alcazar Stock Company in the flr6t San Francisco pro- 
duction of Clyde Fitch's Annie Butsell comedy 

THE GIRL fIND THE JUDGE 

Special Ibsen matinee, Thursday. Jan. m. 

GHOSTS 

With Harry Mestayer and Lillian Lawrence. 

Monday Jan. 23.— Great 1 reduction of. "The Conquerors. 

Evenings 25c. to 76c. Matinees 25e. to 60c. 



Orp 



hp»i irr, O'Farrell St., 

i 10 u 1 1 J . tet. Stockton and Powell Sts. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, Jan. 15. 

HERE'S A GREAT SHOW 

The Ten Nelsons; Four Musical Avolos: Clifford and Burke: 
Will M. Cressy and Blanche Dayne. presenting another of their 
inimitable sketches. "The New Depot," Eleanor Falke, Chassino : 
H. V. Fitzgerald; Kine and Gotthuld and Orpheum Motion 
Pictures. 

Matinees every Wednesday. Thursday. Saturday and Sunday 
Prices 10, 26 and 5Uc. 



Columbia Theatre. G ~ ££*£■, 



sues iinj. Managers, 

Two weeks beginning Monday January 16. 
Matinee Saturday only. Frank McEee presents 

EDNfl WALLACE HOPPER 

and a capable company in the comedy success 

fl COUNTRY MOUSE 

By Arthur Law, preceded by the cut-lain raise, 
CAPTAIN JANUARY, by Augustus Barrett. 

f?fter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 
The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the 
theatre is over. 



PL AY s - p LAVQ 

I ^"ENTERTAINMENTS ■ ^k^»V 



AND 

■ENTERTAIN ME 

Catalog of thousands sent Free ! 



Free! Free! 



Address SAM'L FRENCH, 32 W. 22cl St., New York 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 14, 1905. 




L'oionel jvowalsKy has shaken trum his feet the 
dust of San Francisco, and is bound for New York, 
there to impress upon the people of the Empire City 
the supposition that Leopold, iving of the Belgians, 
was a long-suffering and much-maligned monarch 
until he fell in with the only Kowalsky, but that now, 
lor once in his life, the much-abused King will cer- 
tainly get a fair opportunity to show the world the 
stuff ot which he is made. Some envious people say 
that about the only thing Leopold will be able to 
show, because of his association with our own Ko- 
walsky, is that one of the kingly legs is longer than it 
really ought to be. But for me, 1 have no patience 
with those who would belittle a townsman when he 
appears to be on the highroad to fame and fortune. 
IN or do 1 believe that one of Leopold's legs will be 
longer than it really ought to be. Nay, nay, the Col- 
onel is not a one-sided operator. He has set about 
raising Leopold in the estimation of the people of the 
world, and if to raise him it be necessary to increase 
his stature, and if, to do that, it become necessary 
to lengthen his legs, why, then, both the kingly legs 
will be elongated. But what matters it to us, if Leo- 
pold be but satisfied? 

To mark his departure from the city, some of the 
friends of Kowalsky gathered round the festal board. 
They toasted the Colonel, and they ate his birds and 
drank his wine, and they told him to his face what 
a great fellow he is. Also were toasts drained to the 
health of the merry old monarch of Belgium, and 
withal, the occasion was one of the most satisfactory 
that will appear in the expense account. Kowalsky 
was given a loving cup, and an illuminated set of 
resolutions, and the glad hand, and a few baloonfuls 
of hot air, and he took them all with that quiet dig- 
nity and calm demeanor which have marked him ever 
since he took on his friend, the King. Royal 
doubloons could not have been expended in a better 
cause. And as for the Kowalsky — long may he 
wave ! He has been for years a local institution, and 
with his departure we will all feel that we have lost 
something of our stability, but in the midst of our re- 
grets it will be a true satisfaction to know that the 
Colonel is running a King and developing a king- 
dom. Kowalsky and a king! It is to laugh. 
* * * 

The Rev. Dr. R. Heber Newton, a clergyman of 
some eminence, has solemnly expressed his belief 
that the spirits of the dead return to the scenes of 
their earthly labors. Now, if that be so, I wonder 
if the spirit of Colonel Dan Burns wandered around 
Sacramento this week? 

The Department of Agriculture is trying to find out 
the effects on the human system of various coloring 
matters used in the adulteration of foods. A so-called 
"poison squad" of clerks has been detailed to be fed 
on the adulterated diet until next March. If they die, 
the Department will know the adulterants are dan- 
gerous. Now, let me suggest that all those troubles 
could be saved if the Department would only send 
to this city of boarding houses and doctored food- 
stuffs and ask for volunteers. Any man who has 
withstood a San Francisco boarding house diet for 
a year or two can go up against anything Washing- 
ton can produce. 



That funny little town known as "Saucerleeter" is 
once more increasing the gayety of nations. The 
volunteer fire department has quit its job, and now 
there is nothing between "Saucerleeter" and a holo- 
caust except the doubt of an all-wise Providence 
whether it is better to burn up the place or tumble 
it down the hill. It seems that the City Trustees 
(for even "Saucerleeter" has Trustees) disciplined 
the Chief of the alleged Fire Department, and took 
away his job. He sulked, and his red-shirted laddies 
sulked with him. They all said they "wouldn't play 
no more," unless they could play their own way. The 
Trustees said they were running the burg, and not 
the fire laddies, and as a result, the red shirts quit. 
Now the funny little place has no fire department. It 
makes little difference, anyhow, for there is no water, 
nor pumps, nor engines, to put out any respectable 
blaze that might get under way. 

* * * 

Jules Clerfayt, who is well-known in Railroad Row, 
has been created a Knight of the Order of the Lion 
and the Sun by the Shah of Persia. The jovial Jules 
now carries in his jewel box the insignia of several 
orders. Honors have been heaped upon him. He and 
George Hall are said to be the most bejeweled and 
bedecked noble pashas in the entire bunch, when they 
appear in full regalia, not even accepting that soldier- 
ly bearer of knightly honors, Sir Henry Heymann, 
or that full-blown rose, Sir Knight the Colonel, the 
Honorable Henry Imperial Kowalsky, H. R. "The 
Lion and the Sun" is seldom extended to foreigners, 
and Mr. Clerfayt's friends and colleagues will join us 
in extending to him our most cordial congratulations. 
The friends of the new knight are preparing an elabo- 
rate banquet, which will take place shortly, as a trib- 
ute of the high honors bestowed upon the popular 
railroad man. The insignia of the Order, which we 
understand is nothing short of magnificent, was sent 
in care of the Belgian Consul, the Hon. Rene Hale- 

wyck, and will arrive here in a few days. 

* * * 

Because she could not speak English, and because 
she seemed to be afraid of strange men at night, Miss 
Marie Ackerman was committed to the Stockton In- 
sane Asylum by Superior Judge Melvin of Oakland. 
The unfortunate woman was found in Oakland by 
some of the policemen of that strange place. They 
said she had voluntarily gone to Oakland, and they 
thought she was crazy. The court found that she 
had, of her own free will, gone to Oakland and re- 



TELEPHONE SOUTH 455 

H. ROSEKRANS $ CO. 

HARDWARE 

511 Sixth Street 

San Francisco 



January 14. 1905. 

mainnl I) night. True, it was shown upon 

n that when she hoard tin 
ct night in exciting 

But it 
late. The police caught her. Nothing 
the « taldand police. When it was shown that the 
woman had entire. I Oakland freely and remained 
there voluntarily, the court immediately found her 
crazy, and sent her to Stockton. Well, no doubt she 
ra/.v. 

« » » 

ic of the law-makers propose reorganizing the 
militia by reducing the number of field officers and 
placing the organization upon a practical basis. It 
ted that a Major-General, with his retinue 
of staff officers, and the Brigadiers, with their clank- 
ing cavalcades of aides, are not necessary for the fu- 
ture glory of California. There is much that i~ 
sible in the suggestion. There never was any neces- 
sity for the appointment of a Major-General of the 
National Guard of California. He is of less practical 
benefit than a fifth wheel on a coach. His staff is 
usually made up of a lot of good fellows, who ac- 
cept the appointments because they like the empty 
honor, with its accompanying title, or because they 
think that now and again they may have a good time 
at an encampment. But they care nothing for actual 
military work: not they. They are now even losing 
chances of the fun they expected. At the Atascadero 
camp, State officers above the rank of Colonel, were 
not expected; and that meant regimental Colonels, 
and not courtesy Colonels of the general staff. The 
Brigadiers are also useless. The National Guard 
should be organized into regiments; and occasional 
battalions in sparcely settled districts, and the entire 
force should report straight to Sacramento, where 
the Governor, as Commander-in-Chief, could handle 
the troops thorough the Adjutarft-General's office 
quite as well as they are now handled through bri- 
gade and division headquarters, and at a much less 
cost to the State. This is an age of war conducted on 
strictly business principles, without trimmings, and 

it is about time we cut off the trimmings. 

* * * 

Just five years ago last November, a man named 
Sheehan was elected Tax Collector of San Francisco. 
Another man named Scott, who was not entitled to 
the office at all, seized it, nevertheless, by force of 
arms, drove out Sheehan, and for two years, the full 
term, drew down the salary. Sheehan sued, and the 
Superior Court said he was the Tax Collector, but 
Scott appealed, and held on to the job. Now, three 
years after the expiration of the term for which 
Sheehan was elected, the Supreme Court tells him 
that he was really elected, and that he, and not Scott, 
was entitled to the office and the salary. That is, of 
course, a matter of great satisfaction to Sheehan. It 
is also a cause of much rejoicing to the rest of us, for 
it shows that justice will prevail in the long run if 
the Supreme Court ever gets down to it, and we 
don't die of despair while waiting. 

* * * 

It is announced that Miss Jessie Robeson, of Napa 
County, who is very well-known in this city as a 
charming and independent young woman with a 
mind of her own, and her own way of doing things, 
is about to go to Paris, there to enjoy herself until 
over her comes an uncontrollable yearning for the 
comforts and more quiet delights of Oakville. Miss 
Robeson is one of the new women, to the extent that 
she does not believe in being dependent on any one 
even for amusement. At her Napa County home she 
has many attractions for an athlete, for she believes 
in open air and exercise. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 



Pears' 

There's a unique 
adaptability about 
Pears' Soap. It makes 
the child enjoy its bath, 
helps the mother pre- 
serve her complexion, 
and the man of the 
house finds nothing 
quite so good for sha- 
ving. 

Have you used Pears' 
Soap? 

Pears' the soap for the whole family. 



A Santa Rosa parson, who smokes between the 
times when he gives his congregation the idea that 
they may smoke, sent his boy to the cigar stand to 
get a bunch of his favorite brand. The boy got the 
tobacco, and put his father's name on a coupon which 
represented a chance in some kind of a lottery en- 
gineered by the tobacconist. Now, the winning num- 
bers of the lottery have been announced, and lo ! the 
parson's name, like Abou Ben Adhem's, leads all the 
rest. But the parson says he won't take the prize. 
He is against all forms of gambling, he says. Now, 
that hypocrisy gives me that tired spring feeling. To 
win in a cigar dealer's lottery and not accept the 
prize, is flying in the face of Providence. And gam- 
bling, you say? Why, my dear sir, don't you know 
that no cigar dealer who gives away coupons ever 
gambled? They run a cinch game. That innocent 
parson was used as an "ad.," and he doesn't know it 
yet. 



You will never get "balled up" if you drink OLD 
KIRK "high ball." Hotaling's the best on the mar- 
ket. 



Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. Cooper 

& Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Tou can't help enjoying a visit to the Techau Tavern. where 

the best people in town gather nightly after the theatre. Best 
food, winen and music. 




Fine 



PLUMBING 



Goods 



Our new Show Rooms are open 
to the public. You are invited to 
call and inspect our display of 

MODERN PLUMBING 
FIXTURES 

unequalled on the Pacific Coast. 
GEORGE H. TAY COMPANY 
49-53 First St. San Francisco 

Send for Booklet "MODERN BATH ROOMS," 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 14, 1905. 




The week that is not punctuated by an engage- 
ment announcement is considered dull these days, 
when Cupid is putting his best foot forward. An in- 
teresting announcement is the news that Lieutenant 
Kempff will claim Miss Alice Brigham as his bride. 
The Brigham girls are both charming examples of 
California maidenhood. They have found time out- 
side of social duties to cultivate musical talent, and 
they are splendid examples of outdoor life. Dr. Brig- 
ham was one of the first appreciators of the possi- 
bilities of Tahoe for a summer home, and the Brig- 
ham bungalow on the shores of that turquoise lake 
swung its hospitable doors from May until Novem- 
ber. More palatial homes than the Brighams' have 
since gone up at the lake, but there is a charm about 
their place that the more pretentious houses lack. 
I hear that it was while the young Lieutenant was 
visiting the Brighams at Tahoe that Cupid got in his 
deadly work. The exact date of the marriage has not 
yet been set. but it will probably be one of the events 
of the near future. 

Another engagement secret that sprang a leak 
this week was Miss Louise Whitney's to Harry 
Young. Miss Whitney is a Santa Barbara girl, her 
family belonging to the most exclusive set in that 
southern city by the phosphorescent sea. Harry 
Young is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward B. Young, 
and is one of the most estimable young men in so- 
ciety. A number of entertainments are being 
planned in honor of Miss Whitney, who, with her 
mother, will spend the rest of the season in town. 
On Thursdav of this week, Mrs. Young made her 
future daughter-in-law the motif of an enjoyable tea, 
and on Fridav, Elizabeth Livermore gave a telephone 
tea for Miss Whitney. The Livermore home, superb- 
Iv situated on Russian Hill, is without exception the 
most picturesque place in the city. Mrs. Livermore, 
unlike most wealthy people, has originality and ex- 
quisite taste, and the house is a series of delights to 
eyes jaded by things as expensive as they are con- 
ventional. There is nothing commonplace in the 
Livermore home, and guests soon fit into the atmos- 
phere and avoid the trite and trivial. 

* * * 

The sun shone its very hardest for the Dutton- 
Howell wedding, and a gayly-bedecked crowd 
swarmed into the church. When the local smart set 
puts on its best bib and tucker, even Gotham can't 
polish up its hammer. Critics may sneeze at our 
provincialisms in this' thing or that, but when it 
comes to a dress parade, they must confess that San 
Francisco women are "close up" to Dame Fashion. 
Miss Dutton looked charming — for a bride. Wedding 
finery is rarely becoming, good and bad points alike 
being swallowed up in the yards of satin and tulle 
custom swathes the bride in. If girls could only go 
to the altar in a little less dry goods, they might 
score higher in the beauty count. 

* * * 

This goes to press before the Hotaling breakfast 
can be written in the past tense, so it is impossible 
to tell whether the "meows" of the tabbies will be 
hushed or not. Opinion as to whether an engagement 
will be announced at that affair is pretty equally di- 
vided, but I am seriously told on the one hand that 
announced or not, an understanding exists, and on 
the other side rises a chorus of Bosh ! and Nonsense ! 
So, quien sabe? 



Stroking the lion's mane will soon become tame 
sport if many more literary folk hie this way. Hallie 
Erminie Rives and her red corpuscles had scarcely 
left this neck of the jungle when Stewart Edward 
White and Samuel H. Adams came into sight, and the 
lion hunters were soon on their track. The official 
preserve for lion hunters is now the Sequoia Club, 
but a great many of the members seem to have lost 
their passion for the gentle pastime, so the distin- 
guished literary guests do not have their mames 
pulled too hard. The Stewart Edward White party 
accepted few invitations, and the most enjoyable 
affair planned in their honor was the trip to Tamal- 
pais, arranged by Charles Sedgwick Aiken. 

* * * 

The hoodoo birds crow hoarsely over the rehear- 
sals for "The Liars." One after another, the mem- 
bers of the cast succumb to a severe cold, and hand- 
kerchiefs flutter at rehearsals like white flags of sur- 
render. But such is not the spirit of the men and 
women who are going to do their dramatic best for 
the naval clubhouse at Vallejo. In spi'te of most of 
their voices being reduced to a hoarse shred, prepara- 
tion for the play goes steadily on, and if the colds 
can be cuddled or coaxed away, the performance will 
be given on the appointed day. Mrs. Mark Gerstle 
is particularly anxious that there be no delay, as she 
will go abroad almost as soon as the curtain is rung 
down on "The Liars." 

* * * 

The DeGuigne girls, Daisy Van Ness and Helen 
Chesborough, are the latest wayfarers in other lands. 
All these girls will be sadly missed, and the fact that 
their jaunts will last until spring does not palliate 
matters. Josephine and Marie DeGuigne were prac- 
tically brought up abroad, so it is no wonder they are 
looking eagerly forward to a visit in "dear Paree." 
Daisy Van Ness does not expect to cross the pond, 
but will visit in Baltimore and Washington until 
the close of the season, when she will go to Florida 
with some friends, who spend the early spring on 
1 heir plantation. 

The girls are all brushing up on their French these 
days, with the French cruiser Protet sighted for this 
port. The officers on the Protet are the most popular 
foreigners who ever cast anchor in this bay, and their 
cuming is always a signal of awakened interest in 



WOLF" 






BRAND 



BLOOD, WOLFE & CO'S. 

RENOWNED 

"GUINNESS'S STOUT" 

Oldest and best knowi trand of Porter on the Coast, 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO 
Sole Agents. 314 Sacramento St, San Francisco. 



January 14. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS ^ETTF.R. 



things social. Moreover, the French officers return 
the hospitality offered them in the most delightful 
round of ship dinners and dances, so small wonder 
hearts beat high when the Protet rides the Califor- 
nia wave. 

• • • 

With the long, lean, gray finger of Lent reaching 
out to claim 1; 1 the calendar, host) 

hustling to pay off their social obligations before the 

allotted time of sackclotn and ashes arrives. Next 
week will be a busy one. with innumerable teas and 
dinners dotting the horizon, and indeed the r< 
the season promises to go with a zip. liven Lent will 
be livened up by informal teas and card parties as 
was the custom last year, in spite of hands raised in 
holy horror. 



ENTERTAINMENTS. 
January 7 (Saturday) — Mr. Frank Michaels gave a 
dinner to Mr. and Mrs. J. Downey Harvey, Mr. 
and Mrs. Horace Blanchard Chase, Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Oxnard. Addison Mizner, Mr. and 
Mrs. Berry, Mrs. de Ruyter and Mr. and Mrs. 
Robbins. Mrs. Charles Austin Coolidge gave a 
tea. Mr. and Mrs. Mark Gerstle gave a theatre 
party. Mr. and Mrs. Horace Blanchard Chase 
gave a theatre party. 
January 8 (Sunday) — Miss Georgie Spieker was "at 
home." Mrs. Ferdinand Stephenson gave an in- 
formal tea in honor of Mrs. Sidney Catlin Par- 
tridge. The Misses Holden gave a tea. 
January 9 (Monday) — Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton 
gave a luncheon in honor of Miss Gertrude Dut- 
ton. Mrs. J. F. Harmes was "at home" at the 
St. Francis. Mrs. Gerret L. Lansing gave a thea- 
tre party. 
January 10 (Tuesday) — Mrs. Horace Pillsbury gave 
a luncheon. Mrs. Mountford Wilson gave a tea 
in honor of Mrs. Walter Martin. Miss Helen 
Chesborough gave a farewell tea. Miss Maude 
Payne gave a tea. Mrs. Edward J. Pringle and 
Miss Moore were "at home." Miss Gertrude 
Palmer gave a luncheon. Mrs. F. Lowenberg 
gave a luncheon. Mrs. William Brown gave a 
tea. Mrs. Joseph Sadoc Tobin gave a luncheon. 
January nth (Wednesday) — Mrs. Squire Mooney 
gave a luncheon in honor of Miss Irene Sabin. 
Miss Edith Muir gave a luncheon. 
January 12 (Thursday) — Mrs. J. H. Wallace gave a 
tea. Mrs. Edward B. Young gave a tea to Miss 
Louise Whitney. 
January 13 (Friday) — Miss Elizabeth Livermore 
gave a tea in honor of Miss Louise Whitney. 
Mrs. David Erskine Allison gave a luncheon in 
honor of Miss Maude Payne. Mr. Richard Ho- 
taling gave a breakfast at the Bohemian Club 
in honor of Miss Blanche Bates. The Officers' 
Club at the Presidio gave a hop. Miss Alice 
Dray gave a tea. 
January 14 (Saturday) — Miss Eugenie Hawes gives 

a luncheon. 
January 17 (Tuesday) — Mrs. Leopold Michels will 

give a luncheon. 
January 21 (Saturday) — Miss Arlie Humphreys will 
give a card party in honor of Miss Paula Wolff. 
ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
January n (Wednesday) — Miss Gertrude Dutton 
to Josiah Howell. Miss Loleta McConnell to 
Robert Stockdale Grayrigge. 
January 12 (Thursday) — Miss Jessie Burns to Ho- 
ratio F. Stoll. 
January 19 (Thursday) — Miss Alice Bacon to Thos. 
Driscoll. 



A SKln of Beauty li a Joy Forever. 

kR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 




«5 



CREAM 



Reran - iplea, Freck- 

le*. Moth I'atrhes. Rash and 

Hktn Ins.ases, tin*! rv.-rv blem- 
ish on beauty, and drum detec- 
tion. 11 nai *t 1 the 

- and Is so harmless we 
taste it t.> i.e sure it is properly 

tf.-lt of 
similar name I ir. I.. A. Havre 
said to a lady of the haul ton 
(a patient): 'As you ladles will 
use them. I recommend 'imir- 
aud's ('roam' as the least harm- 
ful of all the skin preparations." 
For sale by all dniKKlsts and 
fancy-goods dealers In the 
United States, Canada.* and Eu- 
rope. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Prop. 
S7 Groat Jones St., New York. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 

Miss Alice Brigham, daughter of Mrs. C. E. Brig- 
ham, to Lieutenant Clarence L. Kempff, United 
States Navy. 

Miss Ethel Woodward, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Woodward, to Mr. Glenn. 

Miss Louise Whitney, of Santa Barbara, to Mr. 
Harry Young. 



Arrivals at Hotel Rafael during week ending Jan- 
uary 10. 1905: Miss D. Baker, Miss B. Duggan/Mr. 
Philip Byrne, Mr. L. W. Anthony, Mr. B. P. Ander- 
son, Mr. and Mrs. W. Jones, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. 
Larame, Mr. E. H. Kinney, Mr. F. B. Anderson, Mr. 
H. R. Baker, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. McDonald, Mrs. 

C. D. Warren and family, Mrs. M. Parker, Mr. and 
Mrs. F. A. Fitch, Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Hartzell, Mrs. 

D. B. Martin, Mr. D. B. M. Buckley, Miss A. L. 
Plummer, Mrs. A. M. Holt. 

Arrivals at Hotel del Monte for the week ending 
January 8, 1905: Mr. and Mrs. L. Grothwell, Mr. 
and Mrs. H. A. Brandenstein, Mr. and Mrs. S. Hartz- 
man, Captain F. S. Winn, Mrs. Guittard and daugh- 
ter, R. G. Hanford, Reverend and Mrs. Clampett, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Mott, Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Chip- 
chase, San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Rand, 
Mrs. C. A. Rand, Boston; Mr. and Mrs. S. Clinton 
Townsend, Baltimore ; Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Hopkins, 
Miss Towne, Virginia ; Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Carlyle, 
Washington, D. C. ; Mrs. E. G. Buhl, Miss Hazel 
Buhl, H. C. Buhl, Miss Tyson Price, Detroit; H. A. 
Poole, Yokohama; H. H. Bailey, Newport News, Va. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Brendan Brady, of New York, 
are spending the winter in San Francisco, visiting the 
parents of Mrs. Brady, Col. and Mrs. D ; . E. Miles. As 
a San Francisco maiden, Miss Miles was more than 
popular, and a social leader among the jeunesse 
doree. Mr. Brady is prominent in New York finan- 
cial circles, and a popular clubman. Mr. and Miss 
Miles will entertain in their honor in their usual 
lavish manner. 

Poultney Bigelow, the writer, is a guest at the Tav- 
ern of Tamalpais, until February 1st. Mrs. Gertrude 
Atherton, the novelist, is staying at the Tavern of 
Tamalpais for two months, where she is busily en- 
gaged completing her new novel. 

The Star Hair Remedy— best of all tonics and restoratives. 

Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not a dye. 
At druggists and hair dressers. Accept no substitute. Star 
Remedy Co.. 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 



TOUPEES 

Toupees and wigs for men— light, cool and fitting perfectly. Im- 
possible to detect them from the natural hair. You do not realize 
the satisfaction of a toupee until you wear one of mine. Mani- 
curing and face massage for men. 

G. Lederer, 123 Stockton St. 

Everything in Hair Goods for Ladies and Gentlemen- 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 14, 1905. 



2T/>e Extravagant 

Junior Republic 



By Lady Algy. 
The other day I heard a woman who is seventy 
years young say that the children of this generation 
are born silk-lined, and, indeed, youngsters do rustle 
into the school room these days, and its not a crisp, 
starchy rustle either, but the seductive swish of taf- 
feta. Girls still in the pig-tail period think them- 
selves abused if their frocks are not silk lined. A de- 
cade ago, children of wealthy parents were dressed 
simply and inexpensively — the youngsters who at- 
tended the fashionable private schools wore trappings 
that could not be distinguished from the clothes of 
the average public school child. The daughters of 
the house of Hopkins, Hager, Voorhies and dozens 
of others, now distinguished for sartorial fitness, were 
gingham-frocked in their unpretentious youth. But 
what a change a few short years have made! One 
never sees aprons in a school room, whether public 
or private, these bountiful days-. The pretty, frilled 
white apron that kept the frock underneath clean, 
carried with it a suggestion of economy, so it was 
straightway hustled into the past. 

Juvenile fashions have always reflected adult 
modes — in the days 01 hoop-skirts and bustles, the 
clothes of the little folk followed the same lines; 
when habit back skirts came in, behold ! every vestige 
of fullness removed from the abbreviated copies worn 
by the children, and so on through all the vagaries 
of grown-up fashions. Therefore, it is not surprising 
that the clothes of the youngsters of this decade 
should reflect the fashions of their elders, but the ap- 
palling fact is that they not only reflect the styles, 
but the extravagance of the day. For every-day wear 
the children of parents with a modest income wear 
fabrics that wealthy offsprings did not flaunt in the 
yesterdays. 

Unfortunately the juvenile dress microbe flourishes 
on the most barren income, and its influence for evil 
is keenest there. If foolish fashion decrees that the 
woolen dresses of young girls show a taffeta under- 
slip, the child of wealthy parents wears it as a mat- 
ter of course. Her mother does not have to scimp 
and save and screw to give it to her, and the child 
does not have to be a party to any sordid makeshifts. 
But the poorer youngster is naturally in "particeps 
criminis" with her mother, and is thus started at an 
early age on the down-hill road to extravagance. 
What is merely a foolish fashion for the wealthy is 
a vicious custom for the modestly moneyed. 

Why a woman who would not think of modeling 
her own clothes after her wealthy neighbor's should 
want her offspring's raiments to compare favorably 
with the child of wealth passes the understanding of 
the disciple of Simple Life. Yet there are countless 
mothers in this land of the free and home of the 
brave who will go to any extremity to see their chil- 
dren as well shod and daintily groomed as any other 
youngster in school. And in these days when wealthy 
people are sending their children to public schools, 
such foolish mothers have to dress their children up 
to a very high standard. Mrs. Poor-But-Proud does 
not envy Mrs. Money-to-Burn her sables and velvet 
gowns — she doesn't feel in the least humiliated when 
clad in her simple tailor gown she meets Mrs. Money- 
to-Burn, decked in the latest Parisian finery. But let 
her see her little daughter outshone by the wealth- 
ier offspring, and she will, in the vernacular, "work 
her fingers to the bone" to put as fine feathers on 
her birdling. 

One of the teachers in a public school which draws 



its pupils from the Pacific Heights district, told me 
the other day that every year the number of children 
from wealthy homes increases — people are more and 
more beginning to value the advantages of the pub- 
lic school. And every year she notes the "increase in 
luxury." Fancy being able to apply those words to 
girls still in their earliest teens! "Wealthy people 
who send their children to the public schools," com- 
plained this teacher, "ought to dress them in extreme 
simplicitv, no matter how well they can afford to 
give the youngsters chinchilla cravats and silk petti- 
coats. Finery excites competition, and as a result, 
the children are giving altogether too much thought 
to their clothes. A snob in embryo told me the 
other morning that she "just hated to come to school 
with such 'dinky' furs !" A few years ago the chil- 
dren did not know cat-fur from ermine — if they car- 
ried a muff and tibbet it was simply for the warmth 
of the thing. But now they discuss each others' 
furs and clothes with the seriousness of grown-ups. 
The cut of a shoe, the make of a glove, excites their 
contempt or admiration, and they become rag-gossips 
before their time. 

"The only solution I see for this sad state of affairs 
is for the wealthy people who are sensible-minded 
enough to send their children to the public schools 
to exercise some of their sense in the dressing of their 
children. Let them hark back to the good old days 
of neat, sensible frocks, and other mothers will soon 
follow example, for it will then be the proper thing." 
The over-dressing of the children of this age will 
have a far-reaching and evil result unless the vain and 
foolish fashion is somehow brought to a short stop. 

A society girl, who has everything that her heart 
desires, in the way of jewels and clothes, was com- 
paring her schoolhood with that of her younger sis- 
ters. "Flossie's skirts are silk-lined now," she said, 
"and at fourteen I didn't know what the feeling of silk- 
was like — and she had to have one of these new-fan- 
gled semi-precious chains because all the other girls 
have, and she wants the hang of her clothes just so 
when she oughtn't to give a hang how they look. If 
the youngsters onlv realized how enchanting it is 
to suddenly burst 'into a butterfly, they wouldn't 
dull the joy by stealing thunder that belongs to a 
later age." ' Of a truth, girls who have been severely 
kept in the chrysallis state enjoy blooming into glad 
rags far more than those who have been clothes-ham- 
pered and pampered in their childhood. It is to be 
devoutly hoped that the Junior Republic will be made 
to return to Jeffersonian simplicity. 




Most elaborately equipped drapery depart- 
ment in America. At 



Geary 
Street 



/2> 



&UWW14 *- 







January 7. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

THE PORTLAND EXPOSITION. 

The exhibit sent to the St. Louis Exposition from 

the pathological laboratory oi the medical school 

University, which won the }^< >L1 modal over 

all exhibits sent from medical schools all over the 

country, will be transported, at the expense of the 
State of Massachusetts, to the lewis and Clark lix- 
on. The exhibit attracted much attention from 
the medical profession, not only of the United States, 
hut of all countries represented at the Fair. It con- 
ontaining many hundreds of 
specimens, photographs and tracings, so arranged 
that the various methods used in teaching are shown 

to the best advantage. 

* * • 

The fine arts exhibit will receive an almost 

priceless addition in the shape of a collection of Vati- 
can treasures from Rome. The Cardinal Secretary 
of State has given permission to Rev. J. T. McNally, 
special commissioner to Rome, to transfer the sacred 
treasures, which were exhibited at St. Louis, and 
supplement the collection by additions imported from 
Rome. The exhibit embraces manuscripts, paintings, 
mosaics, Byzantine work from the Apse of the basilica 
of St. John Lateran, and some objects of art never 
before shown. At least four very valuable pieces of 
mosaic may come, which will be highly prized by art 
lovers visiting the Exposition. These are copies of 
Raphael's Madonna Delia Seggiola, in mosaic; of 
the Madonna of Barbino, both originals in the Pitti 
Palace at Florence, Italy ; of the Arch of Titus ; and 
a tavola di lavoro, or a small table showing the 
method of working the mosaics. Seven pieces of By- 
zantine work from celebrated architecture are also 
expected, as well as a very fine death mask and hand 

of Pope Leo XIII. 

* * * 

An aquarium, which will contain several hun- 
dred varieties of fish, will be a feature of the United 
States Government exhibit. The exposition authori- 
ties have received a communication from the Gov- 
ernment Commission asking that a supply of fresh, 
cold water of 200 gallons a minute, be provided for 
the fisheries wing of the Government building. 

Portland offers many attractions for visitors 

that other cities cannot boast. Known far and wide 
as the "Rose City," it is at its best in the summer- 
time, when the mild, cool climate assures relief from 
the oppressiveness of Eastern and Middle-West heat, 
and nature, refreshed by the winter rains, shows her 
satisfaction by covering the city with a wealth of 
green and a riot of blooming flowers. The exposition, 
though much smaller than that at St. Louis, will be 
in many ways more attractive, being compactly laid 
out and designed to emphasize to Easterners the 
wealth and greatness Oi the Western country. Hotel 
accommodations in Portland are of the best, and no 
extortion will be permitted. Besides, a large num- 
ber of first-class hostelries, the city is covered with 
lodging houses, and thousands of people will open 
their homes to visitors at a reasonable rate. 



NEWS LETTER. 



'7 



Gas Bills Reduced. 
By making a small monthly charge for the use of 
our Regulator, we reduce your bills and keep your 
tips, burners and lights in good condition. Gas Con- 
sumers' Association, 455 Sutter street. 'Phone Main 
717. 



BOOTHS DRY GIN 



FOR 

COCKTAILS, 
FIZZES 

and 
RICKEYS 
Hilbert Mercantile Co. 

Sol© Agents for P*clflc Cstit 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL, 



C»mm&ndi the 
highest prloe In 
London »nd Is 
reoetfnlzed fe. s 
ths Best Dry 
Gin the world 
over. 



GRAND CLEARANCE SALE OF 

Oriental Rugs 

at 40 per Cent Discount 
on our Sale Prices 



To make an effective clearance sale and realize 
cash, we are giving actual 40 per cent discount on 
every rug. 

MIHRAN'S, 205 Post St. 

The oldest and most reliable rug house. 



Headquariers For Progressive Chiropody 

DRS. BROWN ®. LEANER 

SVRGEON CHIROPODISTS 

REMOVES CORNS ENTIRELY WHOLE (Painless) WITHOUT KNIFE, BUNIONS 
AND INOROWING NAILS CURED BY A SPECIAL AND PAINLESS TREATMENT. 

Hours: 9 to 6 p. m. Saturdays, 9 to 6 p. m. and 8 to 10 p. m. 

6 GEA'Ry ST'REET 

Telephone BLACK 2702 Junction Ge*ry and Kearny 




TOM 
DILLON 

SCO. 

OPPOSITE 

PALACE HOTEL 

HAT OEDEB8 



J- p. LACAZE & co. 

French Laundry Work G\i8,r&.nteed 

The BEST in San Francisco 

829 SVTTER ST. TEL. EAST el 5 



Dentist, 
extracting. 



Dr. Decker 

808 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" lor painless teeth 



BUSWELL COMPANY 



636 Clay Street 



Bookbinder, Paper-ruler, Printer and Blank 
Book Manufacturer 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 7, 1905. 



fhe REFLECTIONS 

ofa Knocker 




/Ry John Kendrick^Rangs. 

ON FUNERAL SUPERVISION. 

"Well, if that isn't the limit!" cried the Knocker, 
throwing down his newspaper wrathfully. "Not con- 
tent with running Congress, and personally digging 
the Panama Canal, and getting up a corner in Gov- 
ernment generally, these Administration people are 
now reaching out after the railroads and other cor- 
porations. I don't mind a man's being industrious, 
but, by thunder, I hate a chap who wants to be the 
whole thing." 

"Oh, rats, Knocker !" said a brother Growler. 
"You've been snapping at the railroads and trusts 
yourself from time immemorial, and now when some- 
body tries to do something to regulate them, up you 
pop with your inevitable knock." 

"Nothing of the sort," retorted the Knocker. "I 
don't kick against things that are worthy. You never 
heard me breathe a word against the Rock of Gib- 
raltar, or Mrs. Chadwick, or Harry Lehr, or anything 
else 'that is perfect of its kind. But when things are 
wrong, you'll find me ready with my hammer every 
time, and don't you forget it. Just because I say that 
John D. Rockerbilt ought to be amputated from the 
world's cash box before he gets control of every cent 
in existence, and that the railroads are guilty of the 
seven deadly sins, and nineteen more into the bar- 
gain, and that J. Pierpont Morgan ought to be estop- 
ped from merging the Steel Trust with the Episcopal 
Church, I am not necessarily compelled to advocate 
Theodore Roosevelt as a Money Center, a railway 
magnate and Managing Archbishop of the Carnegie 
Iron Works. 'What's more, I don't knock for the 
sheer love <>f using a hammer., and as a rule individ- 
ual cases don't make a particle of difference to inc. 
but when I see a tendency manifesting itself some- 
where that may work for evil some day, I'm going to 
hit it. I wouldn't give ten cents to save the Rocker- 
bilt-Morgan i mt fit from what is coming to them be- 
fore the people are through with 'em, but there are 
other monopolies we've got to look out for that are 
just as dangerous. It's all very well, Growler, my 
boy, to kick your enemy that's in front of you, but 
you've got to keep your weather eye open for the cuss 
that's bearing down on you from behind." 

"What is the monopoly that you see bearing down 
on us from behind?" queried the Growler. 

"The Federal Government, that's what," said the 
Knocker. "These fellows down there at Washington 
are trying to hog the whole business of the country. 
You don't suppose for a minute that when they get 
the railroads in their grip they are going to stop, do 
you? Not on your existence. Once they get the 
railways in hand, they'll reach out for the cab privi- 
leges of the country, and every hack-driver in the land 
will become an official of the Federal Government, 
with full authority to place you under arrest if you 
dispute his fare or pull him off the box and bang him 
on the head for impertinence. The cab service in 
hand, the Government will grab the theatres and the 
whole drama will pass into the hands of partisan man- 
agers, dramatists, comedians, tragedians and matinee 
idols. No man who hasn't voted a straight ticket in 



the last election will be able to get his comic opera 
on the stage, and if a tragedian can't prove his regu- 
larity to the satisfaction of the Secretary of Mum- 
mers, there'd be no Government job for him. Hamlet 
will be entrusted to some rotten amateur actor who 
has stumped Iowa for the Administration, and the 
job of the matinee idol will be turned over to some 
pensioner of the war of 1812, or Rough Rider of the 
Spanish war, for services rendered. I can stand a 
brakesman on a railway train who gives himself airs 
because he has been appointed to his job by the Presi- 
dent, but no Washington official is going to ram a 
fifth-rate prima donna down my throat because her 
uncle contributed $5,000 to the Campaign Fund — 
and like as not with President Roosevelt in control 
of opera, we'd find the Parsifal appointments going 
to some estimable but inadequate darkey from the 
other side of the line. Can you imagine an Ethio- 
pian Parsifal?" 

"Rot," said the Growler. 

"It would be worse than rot," said the Knocker. 
"It would be ruin. Then when they had the theatres 
cinched, they'd go in for the publishing business, and 
the same complications would arise. Under a Re- 
publican administration, any historical novel that ex- 
alted the Democrats would be promptly suppressed; 
any poem in glorification of the principles of Doctor 
Swallow and his Prohibition followers would be as 
promptly thrown into the waste-basket, and under 



Save tkenv! 
: , 4 Fabrics -Colors 
Wonverv. 

The nvore dainty 

& delicate they are 

' the greater .the iveed 

of Pearliive 

1 for the 
Washing 

GiixgKams 
Dimities 
Pique's 
■ Orgarvdies 
Madras 
Swiss 
Laces 
Lawivs 
Liixeas 

without soap 
, without rubbing 




sl good 



glove 

for a 

dollarand ahalf 



Centemeri 

109 GrantAve.BetGearv&PostSts. 



January 7. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»9 



the present adn >n, no essayist who pn 

the c >f the tlen, and preferred the 

smell of the pine lor 

instruments, could possibly make a living. In 

I Richard Harding 
line and Marie Corelli, we'd In 
polled to gorge our literary stomachs on the output 
of the Government Bureau of Printing, ami it there 
is any dryer reading than that in all letters, 1 don't 
know where to look for it. Instead of the comic 
papers of the land which .-lied so much light and joy 
in the dark places of earth, we'd get nothing but the 
>nal Record, with the jokes of Chauncey 
Dcpcw, toe Cannon and Ben Tillman to brighten our 
pathway through life, and the poetry of the period, 
bad as it is now, would become infinitely \vrse be- 
cause the poets who'd get the fattest jobs under the 
administration would be those who perpetrate the 
Campaign Hymn Books in the Presidential elections. 

Here's to our splendid Theodore, 

And Charlie Fairbanks gay! 

They'll both go in 

With a terrible din 

On inauguration day. 

For they're the Peepul's choice, my lads, 

For they're the Peepul's choice, 

So lift on high your voice, my lads, 

For Chass and 1 heodore. 

' Things like that will take the place of the Battle 
H\ 11111 of the Republic, Hiawatha and the Raven 
when we come to Federal supervision of the Muse, 
and make the poets get their license at Washington. 
I, for one, don't think it will be an improvement. And 
as it will work in plays and poetry, so it will work in 
pies, pictures and everything else which Government 
will gradually absorb. Government tailors will com- 
pel us to wear styles that would drive the rag man 
to drink; Government hatters will put tiles on our 
heads that would make us ashamed to look ourselves 
in the face. Every blessed thing will be on a partisan 
bias in the natural order of things. If a fellow wants 
to make love to a girl, he'll have to do it under Gov- 
ernment supervision. If a woman wants to discharge 
a cook, she'll have to do it through the Department 
of Domestic Affairs, and even then have the case 
reviewed by all the courts, from the lowest to the 
Supreme before the lady will budge if she doesn't 
happen to want to. Altogether, Growler, this Fed- 
-eral control isn't all its cracked up to be, and while 
I wouldn't give a tinker's by-word if they sent the 
Rockerbilt-iVIorgan tribe .to Siberia and made 'em 
work for a living, as the first step toward usurpation 
of private effort, I'm against it." 

"Your indictment isn't very effective," began 
Growler. 

"Well, there's one last point against it, the effec- 
tiveness of which you can't gainsay," said the 
knocker. 

"What's that?" queried the Growler. 

"The millions of people that will be put out of work 
the minute Theodore Roosevelt gets their job — that's 
what," said the Knocker. "No man in the world has 
a right to do as much as he wants to." 



When you treat a friend, treat him right — treat 
him to the best whisky on the market. Hotaling's 
OLD KIRK. 



George T. Marsh & Co., 214 Post street, has on 
exhibition a complete assortment of Japanese art 
;.goods. 



"The O'Hara S Livermore Studio 
of Applied Arts, 356 Sutter Street 
will mahe up in original designs, 
embroideries and brocades furn- 
ished by their customers" O^ 



THE REASON WHY 



So many San Francisco houses ad- 
vertise in the 



Oakland Tribune 



is because it reaches thousands of fam- 
ilies who depend entirely upon THE 
TRIBUNE for all the news of the 
dav. 



COEFIELD ®l 5HERMUND 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

GAS % ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

PLATING and 

METAL WORK 



660 MISSION ST., S. F. Near Third 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1930 



SANTIAGO ARRILLAGA 

PIANO and HAKMONY 

Tuesdays and Fridays at Studio 

308 POST STREET, Byron Mauzy Piano Warerooms 

Wednesdays at Residence 

5734 TELEGRAPH AVE.. OAKLAND 



PRIVATE BOARDING SCHOOL AND 

KINDERGARTEN, 

No. 2514 Pine St., near Pierce. 
'Phone Steiner 3171. 

DANCING, FRENCH, DELSARTE. 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 

Lessons in Painting, Drawing, Sketchlngand illus- 
trating. Life classes, S3.U0 per month. 

927 MARKET STREET 



MR. 


ALBERT 

ARCHITECT 


FARR 


REMOVED 




120 SUTTER ST. 



20 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

BALLAD OF THE GLOYER AND THE BOY. 
By B. P. Anspacher. 

How slushiously the fire burns, 

The flames are cupular, 
The coals are blami-cumble-dum, 

Bright as the evening star. 



January 7, 1905. 



The moctaboon sits on a chair, 

And icy cold is she. 
"Go to the fire," says the boy — 

She minds him readily. 

How coslinly she toasts her toes, 
So slender and so fine, 
While rizzles out of doors the rain, 
And frays the pale moonshine. 

Up jumps the boy, and loudly crills: 

"Be careful of your toes." 
She sank unconscious to the floor, 

Before his very nose. 

Long lay the girl in slumber deep, 
The boy unsmuling watched 

Beside the girl he loved so dear, 
Until the old clock scrotched. 

And as he stood there, boldly brave, 

The office door oped wide, 
And Mr. Bloomenshine came in, 

And "What's the matter?" cried. 

"What is the matter?" said the boy, 

"My moctaboon is faint." 
"Get off your gloot !" the gloyer said, 

"It's nothing but white paint." 

"You're wrong, you're wrong, I know 
you're wrong," 

The angry boy now sleethed. 
He touched her forehead with his hand, 

The farding girl still breathed. 

She opened then her brinster eyes, 
That shumed with leffing light. 

"I've won, I've won," the gloyer said, 
And hugs her to him tight. 

Then many a book and many a chair 
Was scattered round the room, 

The gloyer and the boy they fought 
To win the moctaboon. 

His gloot he carried in a sling 

For many days ensuing. 
The gloyer kept the girl a prize — 

The boy his fate is rueing. 

How slushiously the fire burns, 

The flames are cupular. 
The coals are blami-cumble duni, 

Bright as the evening star. 

Unsurpassed in purity, delicacy, mildness of taste 
and flavor is OLD KIRK whisky. A. P. Hotaling 
& Co. s the best on the market. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 30 California street, San 

Francisco, deals In all kinds of newspaper Information, business, 
personal, political, from press of State, coast alKI country. Tel. 
Main 1042. 



For your protection remember lhal 
every bottle of the genuine 

Vve. CLICQUOT 

CHAMPAGNE 



imported direct from France heart the 
additional label 




A-VIGNIER-G>- 



• SAN FRANCISCO- 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC- COAST. 



This incomparable French Champagne 
is especially prepared to suit the taste 
of the American market. 

Refuse Substitutes 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DBALBRS IN 

^ — TAVE'R^^ 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland Oregon. 
TEL. MAIN 199. 66-67-69-61- FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



Brushes^ 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses 
.laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters 
(billiard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy- 
makers, canners, dyers, flour-mi 11a, foundries, 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

BtichanaLi*. Brothers 

Brush rifts., 609 Sacramento St.. S. F.. Tel. Main 5611 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and commission merchants. 
General agent* 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

Oillingham Cement 

HarHet Street, cor. Fremont 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

409 Post street, between Powell and Mason 
San Franolseo. Tel. Main 1323. 

E. BRIDGE. Proprietor. 




If you want your old suit to look like new, send it to 

Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Works, 127 Stockton street 
Careful dressers always do this. Spaulding's also clean gloves, 
cravats, curtains, laces and all such goods. 




A REWARD OF $1,000 

will be paid for a case of 

WRINKLES. FRECKLES, BIRTH MARKS, 
MOLES, MOTH PATCHES, SMALLPOX PIT- 
TIN0S, PIMPLES, TAN, SUNBURN. ACNE, 
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR, PORT WINE MARKS 

and all Facial Blemishes that I 
accept for treatment and fail to 
cure : : : : 

YOU CAN BE BEAUTIFUL 



DR. W C. SCHLEY. 
SoKool. 141 .'ow.ll St. S. F. 



D.rmatologl.t 
Store. 229 P.w.M Sti 



January 14. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

WHAT GIRLS MIGHT BECOME. 
Young prig are ahv.v i with th 

no matter when they are: whether it l>c behin 
• ling another person's « 
and Harry, or sitting in the easy chair in the 
public library studying where she can find Cupid. 
The more she reflects, the further away he 

A hv should she reflect bo much upon the matri 
mon i.i I side of lite? ( drls need not worry: Provi- 
dence will Bee that they will get their proper Ne- 

tiirls are stilted to such a degree that mama, 
their only thought. In the natural vicissitudi 
things, they find that these imaginative men that the} 
have been dreaming about so long are not worth 
while, and even though aware of the many mistakes, 
girls are not willing to take the lesson to be learned 
by the experience, and of course must suffer the com 
sequences. Their shoulders are broad, and they do 
not care how many romances or broken engagements 
they meet with as long as outsiders and newspaper 
reporters do not find it out, because it might spoil 
their chances if they did. These chaste maidens, who 
have nothing better to do than go in and out of the 
public library to see who's there, and if anything 
:ng, are not the kind of girls that the twentieth 
century- man is looking for. 

The philosophy of life, as some wise writer termed 
it, is to get the very most out of life. This the girls 
are not doing, but think they are. This is another 
mistake. Girls do not think logically. They are so- 
phists. They believe that if they work for a good 
salary and spend a month's wages on a new tailor- 
made suit to make a show of themselves, without any- 
thing further to think about, is not making the very 
best of life by any means ; far from it. There is some- 
thing higher to look forward to. Men who are look- 
ing for wives are not looking for extravagant, frivol- 
ous fashion plates, that gallivant up Market street 
after office hours. They are considered worse than 
nobodies, idlers of the hour, and what not. Try not 
to be classed in that category. 



NEWS LETTER. 



N CO 






Good Writing 

Paparlaone thing, rood Ink la another; ami line penmanship l» 

atlll another hut all ..fth..*.. go branch! with 

Spencerian Pens 

etl no neeeanmry artlole to aeoompllah w»*i results In 

writing I'.vitv rarl tatloners Bamplae lor trial, 1? 

different numbers f->r no In stamps. 

SPENCERIAN PEN CO., 349 Broadway, NEW YORK 



I heir station in life is a secondary consideration, 
(h'rls between the ages of eighteen and twenty-two 
think that they are not old enough to consider life 
Seriously, or form any idea of what she is to do in 
the future. Most of the girls regret not having made 
up their minds at this time as to how they can raise 
themselves, and be somebody instead of nobody in 
the world. 

Girls who hold lucrative positions have nothing to 
worry about, and never think of raising themselves 
above the commonplace. "Ambition should be made 
of sterner stuff." If girls wish to become successful, 
let them refrain from all whims and fancies, and sub- 
stitute ambition where it is needed. Girls will then 
be admired and respected more than they are now. 

True it is that girls have always been the scape- 
goats of mean criticism but they should be broad- 
minded enough not to consider it as unfriendly, and 
accept it for what it is worth to them, and if it is 
good, honest criticism, you may profit by it. 

"Try to reach for more than what you can grasp, 
and live for more than what you can see." 

, — Seline Hess. 



Floating Spots, Dim Vision, 

and weak eyes, cured by Murine Eye Remedies. A home cure 
fer eyes that need care. No smarting'; soothes eye pain. An Eye 
Tonic. 




William Tell Overture $3.00 

Murillo (Allegro de Concert). .. 3.00 

Isle of Spice Selections 3.00 

Hungarian Rhapsodle, No. 2 3.00 

Prince of Pilsen Selections 3.00 

Wizard of Oz Selections 3.00 

Yankee Consul Selections 3.00 

Wang Selections 3.00 

Blue Danube Waltz 3.00 

-. Babes in Toyland Selections.... 3.00 

P— 1419. Teasing 1.26 

P— 641a. La Paloma (The Dove) 2.50 

Pollv Prim (March and Two-Step) 

1.76 

P— 208a. Rosary 75 

P— 544. Stars and Stripes Forever (March) 

2.25 

This is a trial offer and good for one roll 
only. 

Perfection Perforated Music 
savesyouhalf on your music bills. 12.000 selec- 
tions For All Prominent Players— and the charge for 
exchange only 5 cents for each roll. Permanent 
end tabs— the hestPerforated Musical any price, 
the truest, the most satisfactory, dotted expres- 
sion mark, paper full width, flanges nailed and 
glued, neat, strongboxes. Kept. N. 

PERFORATED MUSIC ROLL CO. 

25 West 23rd Street - New York City 

Music Rolls an* being cut In price, but we make the best. 



Pleasures 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 
Wand 



(Continued from Page n.) 

which will be easily recalled by our theatre-goers as 
H. V. Fitzgerald, the lightning change artist, i\ine 
and Gotthold, in their quaint conceit, "A Medical 
Discovery," and the Orpheum motion pictures, show 
ing the latest European and American novelties, will 
complete a varied and interesting programme. 

* * * 

There will be a complete change of programme at 
the Chutes this coming week. Montgomery, Ward 
and Cantor, who offer an original and highly-amusing 
musical burlesque, will make their first appearance 
here, as will also the Yale Duo, refined and artistic 
club jugglers. James T. Powers, a singing and dan- 
cing Irish comedian, will liven things up, and Jessie 
Lawrence, an eminent balladist, will display a beauti- 
ful voice in some of the latest songs. Bernard Wi] 
Hams, a monologist direct from New York, will un- 
pack a dress-suit case full of new stories and jokes, 
and Ernest Wilson and Marie Leicester will introduce 
new specialties in their delightful act, "Love Stories 
Told in Song." The spectacular reproduction of the 
Johnstown Flood continues to be one of the foremost 
amusement features of San Francisco. 

* * * 

Edna Wallace Hopper as a star, and in a new play, 
a comedy called "A Country Mouse," built on uncon- 
ventional lines, with the support of a really good 
company, comes to the Columbia Theatre for a two 
weeks' engagement beginning Monday night, January 
16th. Preceding this comedy, Miss Hopper will also 
appear in a curtain raiser, entitled "Captain January," 
from the book of that name, dramatized especially 
for her by Augustus Barrett. Her manager, Frank 
McKee, has provided a strong company for her sup- 
port, the principal members of which are Edgar Nor- 
ton, Geoffrey C. Stein, Paul McAllister, Herbert 
B.udd, Katheryn Browne, Emma Janvier, Mabel Nor- 
ton and others. 

* * * 

The Central Theatre will return to melodrama next 
week. "A Working Gin s Wrongs" will be the at- 
traction. "The Holy City" will follow. This is said 
to be the best attraction ever put on at this popular 
theatre. 

* * * 

The lady who splits infinitives with an axe for the 
edification of the amusement column of the Call, is 
at it again, and on "Salammbo": "A word as to the 
dialogue. Here one naturally feared. Yet Mr. 
Stange has acquitted himself here again with dignity 
and even distinction. Even Flaubert, with his ir- 
ritable ear, could hardly find that which would much 
offend." 

Remember, in speaking of this production of Flau- 
bert's, that the accent must be on the last syllable, 
the "bo!" Slur the rest, and then come out strong 

on the "bo." 

* * * 

Mrs. Hana Robison of Berkeley is the recipient 
of a marked distinction in having had four of her art 
photographs accepted bv the First American Photo- 
graphic Salon, held in New York in December. The 
exhibit is now being held in Washington, D. C, and 
will be brought to San Francisco in the spring. "Be- 
fore the Gringo Came," Mrs. Howison's prize pho- 
tograph, was posed for by Miss "Teddy" Howard, a 
Cniversity of California girl, who is making a pro- 
nounced success on the stage. Miss Howard will 
make her formal debut in San Francisco on January 
1 6th. 




January 14, 1905. 

Again the Alcazar's 
players are to be seen 
in a high-class comedy, 
and again the enter- 
prise of the manage- 
ment is shown in next 
week's presentation, for 
the first time in San 
Francisco of Clyde 
Fitch's quaint, uncon- 
ventional play, "The 
Girl and the Judge." 
There are striking 
character types in this 
comedy, such as the 
sporting office clerk. 
personated by John B. 
Maher; the kleptoma- 
niac, by Christie Mac- 
Lean ; the fussy board- 
ing house keeper, by 
Laura Adams ; the 
jroken-down rounder, 
by Luke Conness, and 
Mrs. Ickleheimer, the 

u„„ c tj'ii- j • -i pawnbroker, for wdnich 

Marry £>. Milliard juvenile t r r>i n j 

J . , n ,, V una Blanc, unexcelled 

man, Alcazar 1 heatre. ■ u ■ • 

in Hebrew mipersona- 

tion, has been specially engaged. There will be a 

special Ibsen matinee, Thursday, January 19th, when 

"Ghosts" will be given its second representation in 

tl is city. 

* * * 

Burton Holmes has distinguished himself by the 
production of the most interesting of the series of 
lectures, "travalogues," if you please, he has ever 
given in San Francisco. The public has not been 
.-.Inw to recognize the value of these evenings with 
lie eminent gentleman in his jaunts around the 
world. Mr. Holmes is an unusually brilliant speaker, 
and his talk is interspersed with flashes of wit not 
cum mon with most lecturers. The programme for 
to-night is "Beautiful Ireland," and for Monday 
right, to-night's programme will be repeated. Tues- 
day, Mr. Holmes will give us "The Russian Empire," 
and this subject should fill the house to standing 
room. The same programme will be given Wednes- 
day, and on Thursday and Friday "Japan" is to be the 
subject. Of course, all eyes being turned to the Ori- 
ent, it is no gift of divination to imagine a continu- 
ance of crowded houses. 




PIERCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO., Inc. 

STOFLAGE. MOVING, PACKING »i\d SHIPPING 

W . EHOUSE, EDDY ST., near Fillmore 

Separate built roorot for the Storage of Household Furniture 

Office: Post and Powell Sts. Phone Private 571. 



January 14, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



tinue 
next •. inline for the week haj 

ipon at the present writing. I>nt r 
not ti> s li . The repertoire « 

made up from the verj r.is. and every per- 

ntcrtainment. 
• • • 
musical festival is to be given next May under 
the 1" the public school teachers of San 

Francisco. A chorus of a thousand voices will be 
drilled, under the supervision of Dr. II. |. Stewart 
and Mr. W. C. Stadtfeldt. Rehearsals will be held 
urn of the tdrls' High School, corner 
ary ami Scott streets, on Friday evenings, be- 
ginning January 13th. Those wishing to take part in 
iroll their nanus with Mr. \V. ( . 
Stadtfeldt, 320 Sar.some street, room 9, or at the 
(lirls' High School on the evenings of rehearsal. The 
executive committee Ol fifteen, of which Mr. Seidell 
SungtS is chairman, and the music committee, of 
which .\li-~s Estelle Carpenter is chairman, are busily 
engaged on details, and report that the greatest inter- 
est i^ manifested in the enterprise by the community 
in general. 

ANOTHER CRIMINAL FROM THE CRIME 
FACTORY AT EMERYVILLE. 

The race track is responsible for the downfall of 
Henry F, Xeunaber, for nineteen years a trusted em- 
ployee of George Marcus & Co. He has departed, and 
it is alleged has left the pitiful shortage of $1,759. 
taken from < >dd Fellows, of which he was secretary, 
The American Bankers' Association is on his bond, 
through the Pacific Surety Company, and it is sup- 
posed that he will be made an example of when he is 
captured. \\ e are continually condemning men who 
steal, and at the same time we are making no effort 
to curtail the power of the evil influence which is 
making thieves of fathers and sons, liars and prosti- 
tutes ol countless women. We stretch not our hands 
to prevent, but we condemn and punish the criminal 
of our own making. The News Letter is the only 
newspaper in San Francisco that dares raise its voice 
against the cause of untold woe in numberless fam- 
ilies, the humiliation in business houses and the curse 
of the city. Xeunaber is only a sample, a poor, piti- 
ful wreck of humanity gone wrong, a victim to the 
greed of the race track gambler, a thief because the 
community has so willed! 

Where are the preachers, the teachers of men, the 
priests, the educators of youth, the heads of families? 
Where are they? Whv do not they voice the protest 
the press dares not voice? Are they, too, imbued 
with the race track craze, or is it that they do not 
know the debauching influence, the debasing charac- 
ter of this gamblers' game, that is winked at and en- 
couraged by the metropolitan daily newspapers? 

A statistically inclined writer on this paper has 
kept a list of caught and uncaught criminals whose 
downfall is directly traceable to track gambling, and 
it is something stupendous. There are rich women 
lured to drink and prostitution, poor women who 
have stolen their husband's savings, men who have 
not scrupled to rob their families, others their em- 
ployers, husbands who have broken into children's 
trust funds, defaulting bank clerks, etc. — upwards 
of a thousand instances in less than a year. 

This is easily available information, and yet not 
one newspaper, not one preacher or priest, takes the 
necessary step to preserve the community from the 
aggressions of the Crime Factory at Emeryville. 



THE 1905 DOLLARS. 
A remarkable instance of busin th and a 

tribute to the 1 xccutive ability • . the 

' of the "l>.. II. ir Steamship Company." The 
Dollar'' boats are never idle. Tin "M. S. I' 

flour, which she carried 

and the flag of the fleet is known 
n the Pacific. The steamers are easily 
distinguished by the dollar marks on their funnels, 
and there are now nine vessels in the fleet The S. S. 
James Dollar" sails from San Francisco for Seattle 
•■li the first and third Thursday of each month, and 
from Seattle to San Francisco on the 2d and 4th 
rhursda) . 



The California Petroleum Miners' Association, 
through Secretary C. T. Dearie, reports that the pro- 
duction of crude petroleum in California in 1004 
amounted to 28,422,860 barrels. This places this 
State ahead of any in the Union, and surpasses the 
product of any foreign country, with the exception 
of Russia. The California output for 1904, expressed 
in barrels, was distributed among the several districts 
of the Sta'.e as follows: Fullerton, 876,000; Pucntc, 
204,000; Whittier, 780,000; Los Angeles, 1,080,000; 
Newhall and Ventura, 540,000; Summerland, 80,000; 
Santa Maria, 750,000; Kern River, 17,500,000; Sunset 
and Midway, 376,000; McKittrick, 1,650,000; Coa- 
linga, 4,544,160; Sargents, 42,700; Half moon Bay, 
1,000. 



The unanimous adoption by the Board of Super- 
visors last week of memorial resolutions for War- 
Mayor Teschemacher, gave Chairman Booth, of the 
Special Committee, a chance to point out the growth 
of San Francisco in forty years. He told of a tannery 
in early days on the bay slough at the foot of a hid, 
corner of Sacramento and Montgomery streets. Now 
one would need a telescope to see the bay from that 
point. With a few apt and happy remarks after this 
introductory, Mr. Booth closed, amid applause. 



George T. Marsh, 214 Post street, has the largest 
assortment of Japanese art goods to be found any- 
where in the United States. 



Swain's Bakery, 209 Post street, continues to sup- 
ply its customers with pies, cakes, ices, ice-cream 
and general confectionery of the highest order. Tel- 
ephone orders promptly attended to. 

Down-town merchants find the Aquarium a con- 
venient and select place where a first-class luncheon 
is served every day. . 

High Authority. 

Dr. Robert Hutchison, Hospital for Sick Children, London, says: 
"Condensed milk is more easily digested than that of ordinary 
cow's milk." For this reason the demand for Borden's Eagle 
Brand Condensed Milk, for infant feeding, is constantly increas- 
ing. Use it also for tea, coffee and cocoa. 



Clean carpets are a great source of satisfaction. There's 

only one proper way to have them cleaned, and that's by send- 
ing them to Spauldlng's Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama 
slreet. They will come back looking like new, being thoroughly 
cleaned without any injury to the fabric. 



PEOJIPT SERVICE 

(Eenlurri Slfrtrir (Company; 

Supply Electric Batteries for Automobiles. 
Best Repair Shop in Town. Electrical Supplies, Machinery. 

House Wiring and Repairing. 
16-18 SECOND ST: Under Grand Hotel. TEL. BUSH 352 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 14, 1905. 



The 1905 

Side Entrance 16 Horse Power Double Cylinder Touring Car 



Has Arrived 



Call and see it. 



Rambler Automobile Agency, IM co^ l u!th , . ST- 

Phone South 1007 



BEFORE PURCHASING 1905 MODEL AUTOMOBILE SEE THE 

PUNGS= 
FINCH 

4 Cylinder $1,800 

Touring Car 
B. B. STANLEY, Agt. 

Sales Rooms- 596 GOLDEN 
OATEAVB.,S P. 





Type VIII, 30-38 h. p. 1906 Pope Toledo. A demonstrating car of 
this model will arrive Jan. 10. Car guaranteed to carry 6 people 
on road, a mile a minute. 

POPE TOLEDO TOURING CAR CO. 

G. A. BOYER, Manager 

134-148 GOLDEN GATE AYE., S. F. PHONE SOITH 1142 



Tierce Arrobv 1905 

The Suburban, body by Quinby, 28-32 h. p. - - $5.20 

The Landaulet, " " " - - $5,200 

The Opera Coach, " .... _ $5,200 

The Great Arrow, side entrance, aluminum tonneau, 28-32 

h-p. $4,150 

The Arrow, side entrance, aluminum tonneau 24-28 h. p. $3,650 

These are all four cylinder direct driven machines. The un- 
usual success attended these cars in 1904 is convincing that the 
Pierce Arrow solution of the problem of successful motor far 
building is the right one. This success was recognized by the St. 
Louis Exposition, which awarded the Pierce line the Grand Prize 

MOBILE C A 'R'RI AGE CO- 
Golden Gate A-Oe. and Gough St. S.F. 




J& 


AUTOMOBILE 


SPECIALTIES 


J& 




Geo. P. Moore C& Co. 




325 VAN NESS AVE. 


SAN FRANCISCO 



Can America win the crown from the cars of for- 
eign makes at Ormond? Americans, even those who 
drive and praise the foreign cars, are anxiously ask- 
ing the question now. Indications of late have been 
that at this Ormond meet in January, America will 
show improvements in racing cars, and many now 
believe that the honors will go to the "Stars and 
Stripes." This may not be so, but there will be seen 
a decided step in the right direction. American mak- 
ers are awake to the necessity for action, and their 
cars will vie with the foreign cars in speed qualities 
and general makeup, that is certain. This race be- 
tween Europe and America at the Florida beach will 
be watched with interest, and a victory for the mak- 
ers on this side of the water will be a boon to the 
manufacturing trade such as could be secured in no 
other way. 

Europe is waking up to the fact that the despised 
Americans are now ready to take the lead in automo- 
biling, as they did in cycling years ago. The im- 
porters realize that they must hold their own to re- 
tain the lead in this country, and they have made 
every endeavor to secure support from the other side 
in the way of the latest and most modern machines 
and the most successful drivers. Meanwhile, America 
is not bragging, but working quietly toward the com- 
mon end — the snuffing of the foreign candle. 

* * * 

Since last year's phenomenal reduction in world's 
records at the Florida races, the hopes of all speed- 
makers have been fixed on a mile in thirty seconds 
as the remote possibility of their ambition. Terrific 
as such a speed may be, it is still not beyond the range 
of possibility, even of probability, judging from the 
way track records have been slashed in the past 
twelve months. Moreover, the timing arrangements 
next month will be as near perfect as human in- 
genuity can make them, and it remains to be seen 
whether that fact alone will not help to clip off a few 
fractions from the record. But thirty seconds should 
be the limit. After that, it is time to slow down. 

* * * 

The Paris show has been declared the finest ex- 
hibition of motor cars ever held. The greatest col- 
lection of automobiles and automobile appurtenances 
ever brought together were seen there — in fact, the 
collection of the greatest automobiles in the world. 
It was commonly expressed at the Paris show, how- 
ever, that the French cars generally showed little im- 
provement over those of last year. France, no doubt, 
has reached her zenith, and is wondering how soon 
America will rush by. 

"Altogether the same hopeful outlook exists," said 
an American motorist on his return from the Paris 
show, "abroad that is to be found in the United States 
for the coming year. 1905, and the simple fact is, that 
at home and abroad we are settling down now to a 
long, steady pull of a settled business, with the fad 
feature entirely wiped out." 

* * * 

In a letter to the members of the Automobile Club 
of California, L. P. Lowe, chairman of the Executive 
Committee, says in part : "There is promise of an 
early opening of the very beautiful mountain road 
from Los Gatos to Santa Cruz, known as the Hotel 
de Redwood road, which, as is well known, has for 



January 14, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



activi 
u made, looking to the 1 
!. ami it is with much gratification we 
nouncc the rescinding "i the old c 
t>\ the I- • hi" Santa 

ty, which has just been done, the open ordinance 
March 1st next.'' 



as 




The four-cylinder Autocar, which, in its road tests, 
in the East, has been a surprise to experienced au- 
tomobile men. 

* * * 

Quite a number of the automobile men of this coast 
will be present at the Eastern shows this year. Geo. 
E. Middleton, manager of the West Coast Motor Car 
Company left the earlv part of the week for the New 
York show, after which he will journey to the Auto- 
car factory at Ardmore, Pennsylvania, to make him- 
self familiar with the new four-cylinder Autocar. Mr. 
Middleton is accompanied on his trip across the con- 
tinent by George H. Osen, the big automobile dealer 
of San Jose. 



When the automobile show .it Madisoi 
Garden, New York, opens t< public will be 

astonished t<> see the improvements that have been 
made in the 1905 cars, for thi :i the 

history of the industry, now involving million 

dollars, have been made in the past year, and will be 
shown for the first tune in the big garden, where 
about 250 concerns will exhibit cars and ai 

It wasn't s., very long ago that tin- efforts <>i tin Pio- 
neer automobile makers wire directed toward build- 
ing machines that could run. They have long since 
proved that the cars can go, not tor a mile, but lor 
thousands of miles. The cry for improvement has 
been answered to almost the silencing point. 
* * * 
Hardly a day passes but that the modern creation 
has not accomplished some other wonderful teat. 
Southern California enthusiasts were astounded re- 
cently by a trip C. P. King and E. C. Sterling look 
in a White automobile. The latter, a prominent 
ranch owner, went on a demonstration to his ranch 
from San Bernardino, across the Cajon Pass. After 
the auto successfully made the round-trip journey, 
King sold the horseless carriage. The trip was not 
only easily negotiated over the rough going, but 
speedy time was made, and it will probably not be 
long before all the wealthy residents of the desert 
country will be using the motor vehicle as a means of 
transportation. One of the incidents of the journey 
that Mr. Sterling remarked he would not soon forget 
was that after racing with the Limited Express for 
nearly ten miles, when the motorists had to cross 
the track the engineers slowed down to allow them to 
pass, and then whistled a salute. 



Perfected Dunlop Detachable Tire 



Solves the problem of 
proper cost for tire 
maintenance. Made of 
the best rubber by the 
most expert workmen. 
No rim cutting. No 
creeping. No pinching 
of tubes. Punctures 
easily and quickry re- 
paired. 



h 





It can be detached by 
a novice in less time 
than any other tire. Ex- 
pand the ring by means 
of the turnbuckle, re- 
move ring and slip 
outer cover from rim. 



SIMPLE. 
EASY. 



QUICK. 



TSiRADE MASK 

The Hartford Rubber WorRs Company, Hartford, Conn. 



Boston 



New YorK 



Detroit 



Philadelphia 
Minneapolis 



Buffalo 
San Francisco 



Cleveland 

St. Louis 



Chicago Denver 

Los Angeles 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Dr. W. S. Thorne will own one of the beautiful 
four-cylinder Autocars this season, having placed 
his order last week for this make of machine. It was 
after a visit to the Autocar factory, on his recent 
trip East, and several most satisfactory rides in their 
latest production, that Dr. Thorne decided to enjoy 
this season's motoring in an Autocar of the four- 
cylinder type. 

* * * 

E. H. R. Green, the son of Hetty Green, who re- 
sides in Dallas, Texas, has gone in for motoring quite 
strenuously, and last week his l'ope Toledo car scored 
a world's record. The race in which Green's chug- 
wagon won was a one-mile race sanctioned by the 
American Automobile Association. 

* * * 

V. D. Dunn, of Dunsmuir, Cal., became an automo- 
bile enthusiast rather unexpectedly. Lately, having 
taken unto himself a wife, he purchased some house- 
hold necessities at a local furniture house, which was 
at that time raffling a beautiful Oldsmobile touring 
car. To make a long story short, Mr. Dunn held the 
lucky ticket, and is now a full-fledged automobilist, 
having recently run his chug-wagon overland From 

San Francisco. 

* * * 

Probably no motorist on the coast is as fond of 
touring as John D. Spreckels. The Call proprietor 
is a great White enthusiast, and last week received 
his new model steamer, which is finished in a beauti- 
ful coach blue. 

* * * 

The exhibition of certain American automobiles at 
the recent Paris show created unusual interest among 
the foreigners. The Paris Herald said in part, in a 
recent issue : "There can be no doubt whatever 
about the fact that the Pope-Toledo automobiles, 
brought over from America at enormous expense to 
illustrate to the French manufacturers the progress 
that has been made in automobile construction out- 
side Paris, have caused considerable misgivings in 
certain quarters. That is to say, their general excel- 
lence is so pronounced that French makers who 
have relied very largely on American custom for the 
disposal of their outputs have been made to see that 
they will shortly have to look up trade elsewhere." 

* * * 

Among the recent sales of automobiles by local 
dealers are: M. B. Tuttle, of Watsonville, a four- 
passenger Autocar; J. H. Miles, of Oroville, Olds 
runabout ; Walter Hansel, the well-known automobile 
dealer of Stockton, French type Oldsmobile runabout ; 
A. Laib, of this city, C Mdsmobile light tonneau tour- 
ing car; James Smith, Model "C" Winton ; William 
Letts Oliver, Dr. < ). C. Joslyn, B. D. Merchant. B. 
R. Seabrook, of Victoria, 1905 White steamers. 

* * * 

The Pacific Motor Car Company will receive its 
second carload of side-entrance Packard cars Janu- 
ary 14th. 

* * * 

The many prospective purchasers of the Model "< ' 
Winton touring cars are pleased to hear that that 
new automobile will arrive in this city about the iXtli 
of the month, having left the East by express last 

Thursday. 

* * * 

The Pioneer Automobile Company is being kept 
busy with its Oldsmobile line this year. Another 
carload of Oldsmobile French type touring runabouts 
arrived last week. Still another carload of these 
runabouts, and also a sample car of the two-cylinder 
Oldsmobile, will reach here about February 1st. 



January 14, 1905. 

Calvin C. Eib, who, for a number of years, has been 
salesman for the Pioneer Automobile Company, has 
again accepted a position with that concern. 
* * * 
The West Coast Motor Car Co., which is Pacific 
Coast agent for the Autocar and Columbia automo- 
biles, has changed its headquarters in Los Angeles, 
and now occupies the spacious automobile store until 
recently occupied by Norman M. Church. W. F. 
Gouty is in charge of the Los Angeles agency, and 
ii goes without saying that the West Coast Motor 
Car Company will be as prominently before the pub- 
lic as it has been in the past. 



Eyes Irritated by Wind 

Mineral laden poisonous dust, and strong sunlight, need care. 
Murine Eye Remedy soothes Eye pain and cures Inflammation. 
Redness, Itching. Granulated and Weak Eyes. Murine is an 
Eye Tonic: an aid to those wearing glasses. 



SHIPPED FROM FACTORY THIS WEEK 

WATCH ITS ARRIVAL 




Winton Model C. 



Si.ur.n 

% GOO 
3.6S„ 
4.050 



Model C. lf.-'io h. p. 14 cylinder) - - 

Model B. 34-30 h. p. (4 cylinder) - - - - 

Model A. 40 h. p. (4 cylinder) - - - - 

Model A. special u cylinder) - 

Lartrr number of orders already booked. Better get inline. Be- 
im-tiilicrthat if machine is not perfectly satisfactory, we do not 
ask you t r > purchase. 

We Have 13 Types of Machines for the 1905 Trade 

PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 



901-925 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Agents: WINTON. OLDSMOBILE and STEVENS-DLIiYEA 
Oakland Agency— 355 loth Street. 



X5he CADILLAC 




Cadillac won 10 Trophies 
at the Del Honie meet. 

Price $950 
With Tonneau $1050 

Canopy top extra 
August 10. 1904 Cadil- 
lac officially BnM to 
tinfoli in the New 
York ami si Louis 
run. Koails Deal ly 
Impassable. 

CUYLER LEE, Agt. 

359363 Cilll.l)l:« GATE 
AVE.. S. P. 



Red Eyes and Eye- 
lids. Gran u 1 a t e d 
Eyelidi and other 
E?« troubles cured 



MURINE EYE REMEDY 



January 14. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»7 



60,000 Strong 



LVHJf 77 

Why, the circulation of the 
VERLAND M ONTHL Y. People 
said it couldn't be done. 

In three months we will, at the 
present rate of increase, be say= 
ing "Exceeds 60,000." 

ARE YOU WITH US? 

IF NOT, WHY NOT? 



Patronize the Great Western Literary 
Magazine. Send in your subscription 
to the OVERLAND MONTHLY. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 14, 1905. 




The Fire Underwriters Association of the Pacific, 
an archaic institution founded by a lot of the old- 
timers in the by-gone years, is holding its annual 
meeting this week in San Francisco. It is the 29th 
annual junket. The programme is issued in the shape 
of a rate book for district No. 4, and on the inside 
cover the following is pasted : "To be attached inside 
of cover of all rate Books. No Rebate of Donation. — 
The rates prescribed by the several rate books are 
the minimum net rates to be paid by the insured, and 
no rebate therefrom in the shape of revision of com- 
mission, donation or otherwise, or any concession 
which shall effect a reduction of premium to be paid 
by the assured, is to be permitted by any company, 
agent or broker." A most splendid rule, but alas ! 
as well known, more honored in the breach than in the 
observance, but like the cross, it is a symbol to be fol- 
lowed and worshiped as near as may be. This rule 
stands for the ideal, the unattainable and the totally 
unexpected. The call to order was at 10 a. m., Tues- 
day, the programme was: 10 a. m. — I. Reports; Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, Calvert Meade ; Executive Com- 
mittee, Whitney, Whitney Palache ; Library Com- 
mittee, W. H. Lowden. 2. President's address, J. 
L. Fuller. 3. A Library Talk, J. P. Moore. 4. 
Sprinkler Inspections, George M. Robertson. 2 p. 
m. — 5. The Brainwork in our Business, R. C. Med- 
craft. 6. The Careless Hazard in our Business, F. C. 
Stainford. 7. The Adjustment of Book Losses With 
and Without Books, F. J. Alex Mayer. 8. A Sawmill 
Inspection, A W. Whitmer. Wednesday, 10 a. m. — 
9. The Relations of the Special Agent to the Local 
Agent, Jas. C. Cunningham. 10. Building Losses for 
Beginners, Amos Sewell. 11. The Insurable Interest 
of a Bailee, F. B. Kellam. Wednesday, 2 p. m. — 
12. The Use of Co-insurance, Guy Francis. 13. The- 
ory of Lines, Prof. A. W. Whitney, University of 
California. 14. Reports of Special Committees. 15. 
California Knapsack, George F. Grant, Edward Niles. 
16. Election of the Slate. The officers for 1904 are : 
J. L. Fuller, president ; Mr. A. W. Thornton, vice- 
president, and Calvert Meade, secretary. 

Mr. Thornton is slated to be the president for 1905, 
succeeding Mr. Fuller, and Mr. Meade, it is under- 
stood, feeling he could not be re-elected secretary on 
account of opposition of some of the members, has 
decided to resign. Who will fall heir to this posi- 
tion, paying $600 a year, is at this writing unknown.. 

One of the papers that was to be read was sup- 
pressed by the Executive Committee. Rumor s;i\ 3 
that it was found acceptable, until it was discovered 
that it knocked some of the pet theories of the pets 
of the Association. The paper was written by special 
agent Jolly, and if he will send it to the News Letter, 
it would be appreciated. 

Mr. Jolly was at one time in the employ of the 
compact and is now in the field for the Tyson Agency. 
He is an able underwriter, and the suppression of his 
paper, it is understood, has raised quite a deal of 
feeling. 

The papers read were of a technical nature, and 
interesting only to the profession. The meeting 
will wind up, as is usual in insurance circles, with a 
banquet, at which bouquets will be bandied back and 
forth to the tune of the popping of corks and the 
whispering of stories of a "bullish" nature which are 
best told not aloud. 



It is understood that some of the purely insurance 
publications of the city are incensed at some of the 
proceedings, and that the lid is liable to be taken off 
and a jolly good row ensue. This rumor is too good 
to be true, since the insurance papers are hide-bound 
and afraid of the adveniser, but the stories and 
threats they are telling and making would really 
make interesting reading if put in print. 

:,. + * 

It is hard to see or understand what benefit can ac- 
crue frum these gatherings to those who pay the 
bills. The hotels and restaurants and the other places 
may get an influx of trade and dollars, but where the 
companies make anything is past finding out. 

* * * 

McNear & Wayman have secured the general 
agency for California of the Casualty Company of 
America. 

* * * 

There is nothing new about the change in the local 
agency of the Royal Exchange. 

* * * 

Mr. Rolla V. Watt can no longer be accused of 
parsimony. Last week he gave a sumptuous dinner 
to his employees at the Saint Francis Hotel. This 
is an annual habit of Mr. Watt. The bill of fare 
was up to the standard of the hostelry at which the 
function took place, and the most unique thing of the 
affair was the reckless generosity of the host in pre- 
senting his guests after the meal with a corn-cob 
pipe and tobacco ad. lib. The hotel supplied the 
matches. The affair was a success, and has been the 
chief topic of conversation during the past week 
among the .insurance men who were not invited, and 
hence not present. It was a royal affair, done in a 
manner to suit the Queen. 

* * * 

.Manager Havens, of the L. & L. & G. is going to 
visit the home office of his company. 

* * * 

California losses are going to be a surprise to some 
companies, and the average will be a surprise to all. 
The News Letter ventures the opinion that it looks 
like 36 cents. 

* * * 

The Fire Marshal bill topic, it is expected, will be 
thrown into the Legislature next week, and the insur- 
ance lobby, it is understood, has received instructions 
to see it through. 

Mr. F. G. Voss, well known in this city as a mem- 
ber of the ex-firm of Voss, Conrad & Co., has re- 
signed the United States management of the Frank- 
fort. 

* * * 

There are plenty of rumors on the street that there 
are going to be several new agencies opened. It is 
a poor broker that is not expecting the general agency 
of a poor company, and it is a most impecunious local 
who is not going to manage a coast department for 
a fly-by-night non-boarder inside of the next week. 
At least they all say so. 

* * * 

The resumption of the California Insurance Com- 
pany seems to be delayed. It was hoped that long 
ere this California would have had another fire com- 
pany. 

— G. C.France. 



January 14. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



29 







INSURANCE 



A SONG OF MOTHERHOOD. 

Br Marth.i ' il'nrr'8 Mm 

•. own mother used to comfort me — 
Kissing the tears away — 
Holding me close — ave, all i'<" close for sobs, 

I hold thee, little flear one. lout; ago. 

Calming my older pain, by stilling thine — 

As mothers only know — 
My heart-break lost in thine, as hers in mine — 

I hold thee, little dear one, long ago. 

thou in turn, a woman grown and wise — 
Shall kiss, as I kiss now. 
Finding the sunset ever in thy- child, 
F.ven thou, little dear one. even thou! 

SONG. 
By Robert Loveman in Harper's Monthly 
The dark is dying, dying, 

Weary, faint, forlorn, 
I fling my casement open 

To clasp the virgin Morn. 

And now the day is dying — 

She that I love, I swear, 
But see, — tlv Evening woman, 

With star-dust in her hair. 



GIFTS. 

By Hildeganle Hawthorne in Seribner'8 

If God had given me some wondrous thing 

Thou shouldst have had it. I had but my song 

That rhymed to the wild music all day long 
Sung by the chanting sea. I could but bring 
My laughter, glad as the first sounds of Spring 

And free as are the flowers from pain or wrong. 

But these, and my young hope as Heaven strong, 
My wish for good, my faith in everything — 

All these thou hast. But when I brought to thee 
My heart, that with much dreaming was grown great 

Thou wouldst not take it ! yet it cannot be 
That thou wilt keep the dying song, or wait 

To hear spent echoes of past joy? Give me 
My poor gifts back, nor leave me desolate. 

THE VALLEY ROAD. 

By James Owen Tryon in New England Magazine 
At eventide I shade my eyes 

And peer into the West, 
Where, winding down the shining plain, 

And round each wooded crest, 
The highroad goes the sunset way, 

Upon the endless quest. 

Full many a traveler I have seen. 

(And one was passing fair) 
Go down the valley from my door, 

And swiftly vanish there. 
Some I have sped upon their path, 

And lightened some of care. 

One day I too shall take my staff 

And down the valley go, 
For one who went was passing fair, 

And waits for me, I know. 
And I shall find her — O, my Soul! — 

Beyond the sunset glow! 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $5,850,000 



Founded A. I>. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OP PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital 13,000.000 

Surplus to Policy-holders 5,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 202 Pine St., S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 

Capital Paid-up, $3,446,100. Assets, $24,662,043.36 

Surplus to Policy-holders, $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over $134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager, 501 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets S,34°. I 36.94 

Surplus to Policyholders. . 2,414,921.16 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager r'aciflc Department. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 216 Sansome Street. 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 

Cash Capital. $200,000.00 Cash Assets, 387,305.09 

PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

Home Office, 328 Montgomery St. Fan Fmi.cisco. 
Employers' Liability, Teams, Genei al Liability, V 01 k in< n's Collective 
Tessels, Elevators. 

Edmund F. Green, President; Ant. Borel & Co., Trens. John C. Cole- 
man. Vice-President; Franklin A. Zane. Secretary; 1 rank T. Deering. 
Counsel.- 

MAESHAL A. FRANK, General Agent lor California. Hay- 
wards Building. 



North German Fire Insurance Company 

if Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Agt, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 



Cytos 



For Antiseptic Purposes, 
Mouthwash, Poison OaK, 
Catarrhal Troubles, Pre- 
serving the Teeth. 

ALL DRUGGISTS 




30 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. January 14, 1905. 
BANKING. 

Wells Fargo & Co., Bank I fJficifiCiCll 

SAN FRANCISCO , „ _.»„ 

Capital, Surplus^and Undivided [$16,000,000 <" -* . -, . 

Homer S. King. President; P. L. LIpman, Cashier; Frank B. The reading public found some 

King, Assistant Cashier; Jno. E. Miles, Assistant Cashier. The Cominc -lmiispmpnt rlnrino- thp wpplr in 

BRANCHES-New York; Salt Lake, Utah; Portland, Ore. T -^7- ,.V g amusement during tne week 111 

Correspondents throughout the world. General banking busi- .a. Lighting War. watching the efforts of the dailies 

nes transacted. , • , ° . . ,, «. 

which got scooped on the stan- 

TKe S&n Francisco National Bank dard Oil Company's entry into the local lighting field 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco as a competitor of the S. F. Gas and Electric Cor- 

James K. Wilson. President; Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vlce-Presi- nnrntinn tn nupctinn thp nnint ccnrpH h-ir a rival nnK 

dent; F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier; Charles L. Davis. Asst. poration, to question tile point SCOrea Dy a rival put>- 

cashier. ,._.„„ „ „ „„ lication. The best they could do was to make an 

Capital. S500.000. Surplus and undivided profits, JlsO.OOO. . , . ,, ' . . .. . . . , 

Directors— winiam pierce Johnson, wm. J. Dutton, Geo. a. Pope attempt at denying the statement that any sale had 

Mor S ton Be j n a e s al K. wiisln. Almer Newhal1 ' w - H - Talbot ' H ' D ' taken place on the particular date mentioned, with the 

Agents— New York— Hanover National Bank, Chemical National admission of the local representative that it was gen- 
Bank. Boston— National Shawmut Bank. Philadelphia— Drexel „„n _ , . j .1 . li c* j i r\'i r* 

& Co. Chicago-continental National Bank. st. Louis-Meenan- erally understood that the Standard Oil Company 

lcs' National Bank. Denver— National Bank of Commerce. Kan- w r as mixed nn with flip svndirafp whirh snmp mnntlK 

sas City-First National Bank. London-Brown. Shipley & Co. wds ml -y Q up Wltn tne syndicate WHICH .some motltns 

Paris— Morgan. Harjes & Co. Johannesburg— Robinson South ago took in the controlling interest ill the Stock, the 

African Banking Co., Ltd. pith wag , <nocked Qut of al , argurnents in tne ne ga- 

The Ca^na.dian Bankof Commerce tives, and the story stands, the details given in it be- 

with which is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. ing recognized as fairly correct. The best evidence 

Paid-up capital, wm ™ " 08 torn, Fund, j3.500.ooo of th e tru th of the statement is the weak tone in the 

Aggregate Resources, over s9o.ooo.ooo. stock, which is evidently being propped up to the 

HON. GEORGE A. COX, President. . . '. . -i 1 • 1 ■ r ..i 

B. E. WALKER. General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. best advantage possible, judging from the reactions 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., E. C. j n nr ; r p s whirh follow pvprv dprlinp Tf thr Standard 

new york office-16 Exchange Place. m prices wmcti tonow e\ ery aecune. li tne standard 

branches in British Columbia— Atiin, Cranbrook, Oil people are backing up the puny little concern, now 

Fernie. Greenwood. Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, ,, , e „ „_| i ' „„•+• „ „_l,.„i «j „,. „r 

New Westminster. Vancouver and Victoria. the base of a powerful opposition, Overlooked as of 

?S yT U T^^ T J^, 1 S- T jr R J-.? a ^ so 5 a IV? white Horse. little account when the field was being cleared of all 

IN UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and ShngwaT (Alaska). t , . . . ^ 

Also 92 other branches, covering the principal points In obstacles to SUCCeSS by the Olie-tlllle piUSSailt COrpOra- 

Manitoba. N. W. Territories, and Eastern Canada. t ; wlipn fnrminn- itc pi-imhinp flip Kpct tliinrr flip 

BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, the Bank of "On Wllen lorming its COmDine, tne Dest tiling tile 

Scotland. Lloyd's Bank, Ltd. The Union of London and Smiths last-named institution can do is to drop into the lap 

Bank. Ltd. , ., r .,,,., , . , r , ', 

agents in chtcago— The First National Bank. of its formidable rival, resting content to plav second 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS-The Commercial National Bank. fiddle ;„ th f uture . That tile shareholders are in 311 

San Francisco Office 325 California Street. ,., . , . . , . ■ , 

a. kains, Manager. Bruce Heathcote. Asst. Manager. unsettled frame of mind is apparent from the way 

-= -i = ; -j- r ; ^ ; — j — -j- the stock is acting, and this is only natural, under the 

London, fans and American Hank, Ltd. pirrnmstanrps Stockholders in thp S F Gas -inri 

n. w. cor. sansome and sutter sts. circumstances, stockholders in tne s. r. ijas and 

Subscribed Capital, *2.5oo.ooo. Paid-up Capital, j2,ooo.ooo Electric certainly do not repose on a bed of roses just 

Head offlce^o s Tnrefd U ne d ed'e 1 'st. , I' , London. e. c. now, and the future does not look remarkably bright, 

AGENTS-New York-Agency of the London. Paris and Amerl- it must be admitted. It WOllld be pleasant news in- 

can Bank. Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. , , , ,, , . . - i , • i 

I.azard Freres & Cle. 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct deed for all Concerned COllld it be assured With 311V 

™J?tl KssueT 1 c '" e3 °' the world ' Coinmerclal and Travelers' de g r ee of certainty that the story of competition for 

sio. gree'nebaum. Manager; h. s. green, Sub-Mana- the lighting of this municipality was the baseless fab- 

ger: R. ALTSCHUL. Cashier. • .. r .• j j • j j j t *i 

— ncation of a disordered mind and a canard of the 

The Anglo-Ca.liforniaLn Bank. Limited worst description. Unfortunately, however, to the 

capita! ^horP.£F»SsV' tln ^^ ^"pSiaSpPn 600 m ""biased mind, it does not appear as though it were, 

Subscribed $3,000,000 Reserve Fund. »7on.nno a nd the market does not show it either. 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 

make telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit avail- . ,. , r i , e ^.i if 

able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans A lively tight tor the control Ot 

money, bu^an^sel^exchange - ^L^THAL. Managera Pine " St - Market - th ^ local situation is now going 

t. friedlander, cas hier. on between the rival factions 

Security Sa.vintfs Bank on P ' ne street interested in the market for Comstock 

222 Montcomerv St.. Mills Building shares. Quite a number of strong operators have 

DiRF 1 TTOR^w P H A n 1 ,? ?i N ^ E wm, TS - t, l ? an ? ^ A P E \ .v persistently shorted the market in face of the good 

DIRErii)RS-\vill!;im Alvord, William Babcock. S. L. Abbot ' J . .. , r ,, r . 

o. d. Baldwin, l. f. Monteagie, warren d. Clark, e. j. McCut- reports continually coming along from the front re- 

chen, r. h. Pease, j. p. Grant. garding the recent development of ore in Ophir. The 

4 i.2 p»r c»n« interest Pa.id stock has got the bulge on them so far, at one time 

Phoenix Savings B. f& L. AssociaLtion sellin ? as ni ? h as $9 per share - For some . time past 

it has been a running fight, each party scoring a point 

com a D y o S unld er se C n; I ?Vn n n t „ r anv "l T^ ^T^ f ccounts ' intmst now and then, the bulls succeeding," however, in re- 

compounded semi-annually, and 5 per cent on term accounts of . . , ■ , , > ,, it a <n . 

jfioo or more, interest payable semi-annually. gaining their lost ground. How the contest will end 

516 California ST.. san Francisco. depends upon the financial vitality of the clans at 

subscribed Capital 18,000,000 war > w ' tn tne °^ s naturally favoring the longs a lit- 

paid-in capital l^oiooo ^ e ' as t ^ le > r nave a mme at their back which looks 

Guarantee Capital '200,000 highly promising, to say the least. Here is a winze 

Real estate loans made on Improved property, principal and In- down over 8o feet in Ore of an unusually high grade, 

terest payable In monthly Installments similar to rent. running over $130 to the ton, going down perpendicil- 

directors lar in an ore body which has continued to widen out 

A. A. Watklns. Charles R. Bishop. S. Prentiss Smith, George ? S sink!n ? ?° eS °"" Jhis is not a proposition which, 

C. Boardman, Chafles E. Laad. Gavin McNab. Clarence Grange. irorn a m'n' n g Standpoint, it IS entirely sate to COp- 

Managing Director. per. A few years ago, it would have started the 



January 14. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



•cculativc market, and there is no 
lal might happen yet in that line if the ore 
ni OUl as it is drifted upon. : 
thing is ripe for a milling excitement here, and if a 
irtcd here before long, then indications 
cannot be depended upon. It would be the b 
that could happen for this city, which has been more 
dead than alive since the Comstock speculation peter 
ed out. 

Lewis 1. Cowgiil, for many 
Important Change in years connected with tin- 
Banking Circles. S. 1". National Dank, has 
been appointed vice-presi 
dent and manager of the Scandinavian-American 
Savings Bank. This newly-organized bank has for 
its financial backers many of the wealthiest members 
of the local Scandinavian colony, and it is destined to 
do an extensive business. The new cashier is a man 
of recognized ability in his profession, with a long 
practical experience, which will stand him in good 
stead in his new and responsible position. 



The movement in the Comstocks can only be ac- 
centuated by the addition of the Tonopah-Goldfield 
shares. There were always outside camps in active 
operation in the palmy days of the Comstock. Bodie, 
White Line, Tuscarora and Belmont thrived when 
the Comstocks were fluctuating at their widest un- 
der the exciting stimulus of the big bonanza. To- 
day the new Nevada gold shares will strengthen the 
flame of speculation in the old promoters, and do 
more good than harm during a deal on the Comstock. 
The shares of both these camps are very active just 
now. The aggregate of sales last week in the big 
board in this line of stocks footed up 208,321 shares. 
In the Tonopah Exchange the total shares were 114,- 
352. One of the most active stocks in the list was 
MacXamara, which sold up to 32 under a firm de- 
mand, closing at 28. Montana-Tonopah was also 
active, selliing up to $2.20 from $1.85. Sandstorm 
was largely 7 dealt in, selling down to 48 cents. Tono- 
pah-Xevada has advanced to $11.25 bid. The other 
Goldfied and Tonopah shares were steady. In other 
adjacent camps, original Bullfrog is looking up, under 
a good demand. 



The market for local securities is fairly active. 
Sugar stocks are again in good demand, on the 
strength exhibited in the market for raws. 

C. K. Mcintosh, heretofore cashier of the First 
National Bank, has been appointed vice-president 
and general manager of the San Francisco National 
Bank. 



The Nevada National Bank has reported its finan- 
cial condition at the close of business December 31st. 
Its total assets amount to $19,273,765.60. Its deposits 
amount to $9,093,903.67. Money in hand and due 
from banks amount to $5,988,108.09. The bank has 
decided to enlarge its present quarters by taking in 
the premises at 410 Pine street. 



The directors of the Bank of California have by 
unanimous vote elected Homer S. King president of 
that institution to succeed the late William Alvord. 
The new president is at present president of Wells, 
Fargo & Co.'s Bank. He has for many years been 
•prominent in local financial circles, and he is recog- 
nized as an able and conservative financier of long 
experience. No other changes are announced in the 
o cial force of the bank. Charles R. Bishop is first 
vice-president ; F. B. Anderson is vice-president and 



3' 
igcr; I. M. Moulton i- cashier. In addition to 

gentlemen, the board of directors includi 
Mien, \\ illiam Babcock, Antoinc B01 
' larl man, Edward W .Hopkins, 

Merril and Jacob Stem. 

Do You Want a Trunk 
\t a moderate price, one that lo"ks t;.,.„| and is good? 
Made of genuine Bass wood, brass trimmed, with 
leather straps, and two trays. It is a leader in our 
mink department, and the price is $8. We li 
special suit case also al $5.50 thai is equally as good 
and cheap. Sanborn. Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 

-The evening at the theatre will be far more pleaaant If you 
• r« looking forward to an hour at Zlnkand's afterwards. There 
L-nll will enjoy the boat food, wtnea and liquors In town. 

BANKING. 

San Francisco Sswings Union 

532 California St.. cor. Webh St., San Francisco. 

R. n. POND. President: W. C. B. DeFREMERY, ROBERT 
WATT. Vice-Presidents; LOVELL WHITE, Cashier; R. M. 
WELCH. Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— E. B. Pond. W. C. B. DeFremery, Henrv F. Allen 
WakeM. -Ill Baker. Jacob Barth. C. O. G. Miller. Fred H. Beaver, Wil- 
liam A. Tltaeep, Bol.erl Watt. 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells. Fargo & Co., or by checks 
of reliable parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsi- 
bility of this savings bank commences only with the actual re- 
ceipt of the money. The signature of the depositor should ac- 
company the first deposit. No charge Is made for pass book 
or entrance fee. 

Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

Deposits June 30, 1904 $33,940,132 

Guarantee Capital, Paid-up 1,000,000 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 976,109 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

710 Market St., opposite Third. 

Guarantee Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 535.000 

Deposits, over 9.000,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President: S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Presi- 
dent; JOHN A. HOOPER. Vice-President; GEORGE A. STORY 
Cashier: C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Pheian. S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels. James M. McDonald. Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent on postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,474.518. 81s 

Capital Actually Paid-up In Cash 1,000,000 

Deposits, Dec. 81. 1904 37,281,377.60 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President. Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann; 
Ign. Steinhardt. Emil Rohte, H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter and J. "W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier. A. H. R. Schmidt: Assistant Cashier, William Herr- 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muller: General Attorney. W. S. Goodfeilow. 

Continental Building & Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 

301 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital $17,000,000.00 

Paid-in Capital 3,600.000.00 

Profit and Reserve Fund 450,000.00 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; William Corbin, Secretary 
and General Manager. 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital $3,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1,725,000 

Authorized to act as Executor. Administrator, Guardian or 
Trustee, Check accounts solicited, Legal Depository for money In 
Probate Court proceedings. Interest paid on Trust Deposits and 
Savings. Investments carefully selected. 

Silver Dollar Wine Rooms 

PINE MERCANTILE LUNCH served every day from 11 to 2 
o'olock. Finest Wines. Liquors and Cigars. 

<|EEBA <a DOLAN, Proprietor* 

812 Sansome street, cor. Halleck. San Francisco. Tel. Black 602 



32 



vr-r^KT^rr-JtrrrwT^Msr 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. January 7, 1905. 

Uhe Minister of Foreign Affairs 





A^T^ 


a 


p 


** 


*^f 












1 


i 
i 






1 




. 














1 










~- ,1 





HIGH 
CLASS 
WALL 
PAPERS 

AT ALL PRICES 

Interior 
Decorating 
Ideas and 
Estimates 
Furnished 

L. Tozer & 
Son Co. 

Retail Salesroom 

110 GEARY ST. 

2nd Floor 
Wholesale Department 

762-764 Mission 
Street 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Andes Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco. Cal. Location 
of works. Virginia Mining Di trict. Storey County. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given t bat at a meeting of the Board of Directors 
held on the 22nd day of December, 1904, an assessment (No. 02) of ten 
(10) cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the secretary at the 
office of the company, moms 21 and 22 Nevada block. 309 Montgomery 
street, San Francisco. Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 2fith DAY OF JANUARY, 1906 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction ;and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on FRIDAY, the 17th day of 
February, 1906, at 1 o'clock p. m.. to pay the delinquent assessment to- 
gether with the ci. si of rulvertisiiiK and e_\ reuses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

JOHN W. TWIGGS. Secretary. 

Office— Rooms 21-22 Nevada block, aoo Montgomerj slier t. San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of JOHN GIBBONS, deceased. Dept. 8. No. 31549. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned. M. J. HYNES. Public 
Administrator of the City and Co mty of San Francisco. a*i J Admin- 
istrator of the estateof JOHN GIBBONS, deceased. 10 the creditors of, 
and all persons having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit 
them with th* necessary vouchers, within four months afler the Hist 
publication of this notice, to the said Administrator, at room 568 
Parrott building. Nos K25 to 856 Market street, the same being his place 
for the transaction of the business of ihe said estate in the City and 
County of San Francisco. State of California. 

M. J. HYNES. 

At-aliistratir of the Estateof JOHN GIBBONS. Deceased. 

Dated at San Francisco. January 14, 1906. 

CULLINAN & HICKEY. Attorneys for Administrator, rooms 667 
668 and 669. Parrott building. San Francisco, Cal. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASERS' GUIDE 

BERGEZ RESTAURANT— Rooms for ladles and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez. Proprietor 

POODLE DOO RESTAURANT-N. E. Cor. Eddy and Mason streets 
Private dining and bannuet rooms. Telephone Private Exchange 429 
A- B. Blanco. Proprietor. 

~ NOTARr PUBLIC. 

MARTIN ARONSOHN. Notary Public and Pension Attor- 
ney. Office, 632 Market street, room 8, (opp. Palace Hotel) San 
Francisco. Tel. Black 6541. Loans on any security at lowest 
terms; no commissions. 



Most Interesting 
Events. 



BOILER MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314. 318, 318 Main 
street. Iron work of every description designed and constructed. 



Events the past week in inter- 
national concerns have been in- 
teresting, to say the least. Or- 
ders for the return of the Baltic 
fleet to home waters comes as a surprise, for it was 
pretty gene,raHy believed that Russia would feel 
morally bound to make the effort to reach Vladivos- 
tock, but it would seem thai fleeing from the enemy 
without firing a shot is not now considered a humil- 
iating act by the St. Petersburg Government. Any- 
way, the fleet of more' than forty war craft that sailed 
out of the Baltic Sea two months ago is now rushing 
back to home waters, thus admitting a mural defeat 
and granting a moral victory to the Japanese. But 
the real surprise of the week was the announcement 
by the Tokio Government that its military resources 
for service in .Manchuria amounted to 1,000,000 of 
all arms. Hitherto, the belief has been that the 
cradle and the grave would have to he robbed to 
secure much over 600,000, but this semi-official 
statement of the ultimate available force puts a new 
aspect on the situation, and warrants the belief that 
Japan would not entertain any sort of a peace propo- 
sition that did not provide for the permanent with- 
drawal of Russia from Manchuria. This surmise is 
fully justified by confessions from St. Petersburg 
that, owing to England's daring policy in Asia and 
home restlessness, the Russian Government will not 
be able to marshal as man)' soldiers in the Far East 
as Japan. Necessarily, this admission means that 
General Kuropatkin will make no effort to retake lost 
territory, but keep himself on the defensive, and 
obliging Marshal Oyama to be the aggressor. The 
surprising thing is that Russia would admit that she 
is so handicapped by home troubles and British ag- 
gressiveness, unless it is done to pave the way to 
final defeat in Manchuria. 

Those who think Russia does not 
realize that she must become a 
great sea power are mistaken. The 
Government has decided to spend 
$200,000,000 for warships, and to begin their construc- 
tion at once. And the Navy Department has the 
good sense to see that very many of them will have 
to be let by contract to shipyards of other countries. 
That San Francisco will build several of them there 
is no reason to doubt. But it would be a mistake to 
suppose that Russia is bankrupt in ships. She has 
about seventy-five war craft of various kinds in com- 
mission, or nearing completion. However, even her 
new navy will seem small beside Great Britain's pos- 
sible six hundred, including liners converted into 
cruisers. 

The leading event of the week, 
England Turns so far as British aggressiveness 
Another Trick, is concerned, was the rather cool 
and unqualified announcement 
by the London Government that Great Britain would 
not only not withdraw from the "sphere of influence" 
in China, but would make her stay at Wei-hai-wei 
permanent, and also extend her "sphere" over much 
more of the Shang-tung Peninsula. This possession, 
together with Afghanistan, Thibet and a "friendly 
understanding" with Persia, completely flanks Rus- 
sia in the Far East and in the" South and Southeast. 
In fact, within six months England has secured even' 
one of Russia's highways of territorial acquisition in 
Asia, except as to North China, herself occupying 
the identical regions that the Czar has been intrigue- 
ing to possess for more than a quarter of a century. 
History gives no account of another such immense 



Millions for 
War Ships. 



January 14. 190$. 

'ii without tiring a £im. 

i what these, new acqu it Britain 

iil he hail when it is said that they would 

ilifornia. \\ ei-hai- 

nmercial center, a 

harbor, and a naval station in one of the 

nanding positions in the waters of t1>< Fai 

Although Japan has out-generaled Russia l>> 

land and sea in recent months, her achievements in 

war will not begin to compare with what Great 

u during the same months in the field 

of diplomatic strategy. Indeed, England herself has 

never before had such a walk-over. 

The continued ill-health of 
Waiting for Trouble, the Emperor of Austria is 
causing no little anxiety in 
Europe. Not that his death would cause greater 
sorrow than could be comfortably borne, but what 
complications might follow his death is what the 
crowned heads are bothered about. It is an open 
secret that the Kaiser is expecting that the demise of 
the old Emperor will be the coming of the long- 
hoped-for opportunity to annex German Austria to 
Germany. The Balkan States hope that the same 
event will pave the way for their federation. Should 
things come to pass, it is conceded that the 
Sublime Porte would be driven out of Europe, and 
there are many in State circles who believe that these 
events are approaching so rapidly that they may cul- 
minate before the end ot 1905. So, while there are 
few surface indications of upheavals in the near fu- 
ture, the conditions are such that storms may come 
at almost any time. And yet there is a feeling of 
security from war, and strangely enough, it is be- 
cause the royal heads and statesmen of Europe are 
relying upon a Republic — the Republic of the United 
States — to arbitrate and adjust their international 
differences and prevent armed conflicts. In the di- 
rection of all that makes for peace, no nation ever ex- 
erted so much influence in the world as the United 
States now does. It is not a balance of power influence 
nor does it come from a preparedness to enter an 
armed conflict. It comes from a moral force and a 
sense of right and justice which no other -nation en- 
joys in the family of nations to the same extent. And 
all nations fully realize that conditions would have 
to be strained to the breaking point if the good offices 
of the American Republic were declined. 

The "profit and loss" account of 
The Profit and the Port Arthur business is be- 
Loss Account, ginning to present itself. It cost 

Japan $100,000,000 and about 70,- 
000 men to capture the stronghold. Including de- 
stroyed warships, guns, fort equipments and real 
property, the Russian loss was $300,000,000 and about 
60.000 men, including prisoners of war. History 
gives no account of such a frightful sacrifice of hu- 
man beings in so brief a conflict, and confined to so 
small a territorial area. And unlike most battles, the 
percentage of officers killed and wounded was greater 
than that of the rank and file. In no modern con- 
flict of arms was human life and expenditure of 
money so lightly considered as at Port Arthur. In 
accordance with Russia's cruel and soulless custom, 
General Stoessel must submit to a court martial for 
sacrificing all the men and himself. Already the hue 
and cry has been raised against him, but it is not be- 
lieved that the Czar will defy public sentiment the 
world over and permit indignities to be flung at the 
brave Stoessel. The Japanese treat great warriors 
in a different way. The moment the surrender was 
announced, the Mikado ordered that in all respects 
General Stoessel should have the same honors shown 
him that are due to the Field Marshal of Japan, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



33 



Huinarr 




The champagne 
of perfection. 
Essential to the 
enjoymenf oi° 
any function 
^r HILBERT 

MERCANTILE, G 

PACIFIC COAST AOENTJ 

VWGasWU-Special-Adf? 

ST- . O . 

a n r rancisco 




THE FOUR-TRACK NEWS 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE 

OF 'jl RAVEL AND EDUCATION. 

150 or More Pages Monthly. 

Its scope and character are indicated by the following 

titles of articles that have appeared in recent 

issues; all profusely illustrated: 

Among Golden Pagodas Kirk Munroe 

Marblehead M. Imlay Taylor 

A Study in Shells Dr. R, W. Shui'eldt 

Santo Domingo Frederick A. Oher 

Eleven Hours of Afternoon Cy Warman 

A Gala Night on the Neckar Kathleen L. Greig 

Echoes From Sleepy Ho..ow Minna Irving 

Golf in the Rockies Henry Russell Wray 

In Barbara Freitchie's Town Thomas G. Harbaugh 

Back of the Backwoods ; Charles Howard Shinn 

A Feast of Music ..Jane W. Guthrie 

Sailors' Snug Harbor Bessie H. Dean 

Since Betty Golfs— Poem Josephine Wilhelm Hard 

Niagara's Historic Environs Eben P. Dorr 

In the Old Wood-Burner Days James O. Whittemore 

The Land of Liberty and Legends Guy Morrison Walker 

Nature's Treasure-house Earl W. Mayo 

Down the Golden Yukon George Hyde Preston 

Corral and Lasso .Minnie J. Reynolds 

Little Histories: 

An Historic Derelict Charlotte Philip 

Where Lincoln Died Alexander Porter 

The Poets' Corner Isabel R. Wallach 

The Treason House William Wait 

Single Copies 10 cents, or $1,00 a year. 
Can be had of newsdealers, or by addressing 



GEORGE H. DANIELS, Publisher, 



Room No. 14 A. 



7 East 42 St., New York. 



** Delicious Menus Delicately Designed ^* 

Christmas Tree Decorations and Ornaments. 

Individual Dinner Cards. Christmas Cards and 

Name Cards and Flower Gifts. Call and see them. 




vD^coratoi^ltP:' 







"231 Fb 



H. ISAAC JONES, M. D. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

, .in,., — - .. i„,n U M-illilliiK. 1-1 Geary street. San Francisco. 
Rooms. 3IK. »'4. :'.nr. Hours, in a. m. to 1 p. m., 2 to 4 p. m. Sun- 
day by SHiiilnlment. Telephone. Private Exchange, 216. Resi- 
dence, corner 5th avenue and 16th St., Oakland. Tel. East 38. 



34 SAN FRANCISCO 

Co-operative Club House 



With the unprecedented growth of women's clubs 
in this and every other city, has come a vexed ques- 
tion, one with which ninety-nine per cent of them are 
at present concerned — that of providing suitable habi- 
tations. In San Francisco there are a number of 
phases of the troublesome problem up for considera- 
tion. Probably the most important concerns the pro- 
posed erection of a large club building by some local 
capitalist, who will find remunerative and alto- 
gether satisfactory tenants in at least eighteen or 
twenty or more clubs. This looks fair sailing, but it 
is not, primarily because of the widely diversified in- 
terests of the clubs. There is a great desire upon 
the part of the women to be harmonious, and to give 
and take in the adjustment of differences, but how are 
they going to help themselves when circumstance 
and lines of work have made their organization and 
their development so different. 

About three times in the last decade enterprising 
club-women have put forth sporadic efforts toward 
the co-operative plan of club housekeeping, but never 
until now has there seemed to be a promise of the con- 
summation of the scheme whereby the clubs may 
have the greatest amount of comfort for the smallest 
outlay. Briefly, the present movement is as follows : 
Filled with a desire to house the Sequoia Club, for 
whose organization she is responsible, Miss Ednah 
Robinson invited the local clubs to meet and con- 
sider the question ,also a number of real estate people 
and some architects. Up to the present time, several 
meetings have been held, most of them in the apart- 
ment of Mrs. I. Lowenberg, in the Palace Hotel. The 
one of last Tuesday left the question about as much in 
the air as it has been, except in so far as the repre- 
sentatives of the different clubs expressed their 
preference for a site. Some of them feel that they 
must keep within the radius of a few blocks. Others 
would not object to a place anywhere within reason- 
able riding distances. The real stumbling block lies 
in the fact that the most important organizations, 
financially speaking, must have quarters down town. 
All this would mean larger rents for all, and not such 
spacious accommodations, because property is fabu- 
lously high-priced in that quarter. 

If a site should be secured well out into the resi- 
dence district, the club house will come into compe- 
tition with the Century Club, which is preparing to 
erect a building at the corner of Sutter and Franklin 
streets, and the California Club, which is struggling 
with the problem *of erecting a $40,000 building, with 
$25,000 available, on their lot in Clay street. Both of 
these clubs expect to have tenants who will help them 
to work out their financial problems. Some of the 
clubs directly concerned with the new project are 
now renting from the Century Club. 

The history of the erection of club houses through- 
out the country has been vexatious in the extreme for 
those who have had the handling of them, but the out- 
come as an investment has always been satisfactory. 
Both in Southern California and in the East, where 
stock has been subscribed by the members of the 
club, there has always been an adequate return on 
the investment. In Chicago, private individuals 
have never regretted building club houses for rent. 
There, however, the most important clubs have been 
renters, not builders. In this city, with some clubs 
willing to go up town, with others intent upon stav- 
ing down town, and with two large clubs building 
Solon and an old Philadelphia lawyer will have 
sit in counsel with the ones who would have a cc 
operative building. 



NEWS LETTER. January 14, 1905. 

OBITUARY. 

The funeral of Her Excellency, Frau von Kusse- 
row, widow of the former Prussian Embassador and 
Privy Councillor von Kusserow, of Hamburg, who 
died December 8, 1904, took place December 12th, at 
10 o'clock, from her late residence, Neue Raben- 
strasze No. 21. Besides members of the family, and 
many friends and acquaintances, the funeral services 
were attended by a large number of notable person- 
ages, amongst whom were: Burgermeister, Dr. Bur- 
chard ; Senators D'Ewald and Dr. G. Hertz ; His Ex- 
cellency von Tschirschky-Bogendorff, Prussian Em- 
bassacior-Extraordinary and Minister Plenipoten- 
tiary ; Sir William Ward, Consul General of Great 
Britain; Alfred Kayser, Roumanian Consul-General, 
and others. The body lay in the large salon of the 
house in a magnificent oak casket, surrounded by an 
immense number of beautiful floral offerings. The 
services consisted of musical selections by the Maen- 
ner-chor of St. Michaelis, and remarks by Pastor 
Ansbach of Kreuznach, a friend of the family, who af- 
terwards spoke the last words at Ohlsdorf, where the 
interment took place. An endless line of carriages 
followed the remains to the grave. — Hamburger 
Xachrichten. 



Merchants and insurance men who are located clo^e 
to the California Market, find Moraghan's oyster 
stalls the cleanest and best place for a noon-day meal. 
Steaks and chops and all kinds of fish cooked to or- 
der. 



Did You Ever Stop to Think 

What a pleasure it is to look at pretty photographs? 
Get a camera and take the pictures yourself. We have 
cameras from 80 cents up, and all photographic sup- 
plies. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 

Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 17.50 

per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Full weight guaranteed. In 
economy, cleanliness and heat producing qualities. Briquettes 
are superior to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th 
and Channel. Phone South 95. 



Mothers be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing Syrup" 

'^r vour children while teething. 



-OUR ANNUAL- 



CLEARANCE SALE 

BEGAN TUESDAY. JANUARY 3rd 

DISCOUNT ON 

EVERYTHING 

S. ® G. GUMP CO., 113 Geary Street 
San Francisco, Cal. 



OUR STANDARDS 



Sperrys Beat Family. 

Drifted Snow. 
Golden Gate Extra.. 



vS perry Flour Company 



January 14. 1905. 

You pay five 
times too much 
for lamp-chim- 
neys. 

Buy good ones. 
Macbeth. 

If you use a wrong chimney, you Jose a 
good deal of both light and comfort, and 
9ra>le a dollar or two a year a lamp on 
chimneys. 

Do you want ihe Index ? Write me. 

Macbeth, Pittsburgh* 

SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thieves.; 

When Columbus reached the is- 
land of Hayti on his second voyage 
he observed that the natives used 
crude rubber as a medium of ex- 
change. "These people," he wrote 
in his diary, "are so highly civil- 
ized that they possess an elastic 
currency." Which was intensely 
interesting to the financiers of ef- 
fete Europe. 

Not long ago, a certain young 
man went to publish the bans of 
his marriage with his best girl. On 
the sexton putting the question: 
"Is she a widow or a spinster?" 
the young man replied: "No, sir; 
she is a fitter in a boot and shoe 
warehouse." 

Mrs. Goodsoul — So you are go- 
ing to be married? Have you made 
all arrangements? Dinah — No, 
missy; I ain't dun make all de 
'rangements. I only got ter buy 
de ring, git de furniture, rent de 
flat, buy me some clothes, git mah 
husband some things, and git him 
a jawb ; but dem is only de least 
important. — Judge. 

Fuddy — The Widow Jinks has 
four marriageable daughters, and 
every one of them is engaged. 
What do you think of that? Duddy 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



BETH ES DA 



THE GREAT AMERICAN 
MINERAL WATER 



LOUIS CAHEN ® SON. 

WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

418 Sacramento St., San Francisco 



"This lin't do holiday lor me," 
remarked the starving sailor, as he 
drifted in the open boat on Christ- 
mas, "but, oh, Lord, it surely is a 
l.oll.nv day!' Then he pulled his 
belt one hole tighter, and, falling 
into a slight doze, dreamed about 
plum-duff.— Judge, 

Husband— \\ hy in the world do 
you keep your new fur boa hang- 
ing out on the line? Mrs. Fluffy— 
Because 1 nearly roast with it on 
this kind of weather, and it's the 
only way 1 can let people know- 
that I've got it! 

Teacher — Now, Tommie, what is 
the meaning of the word "pur- 
chase:'' Tommie — Don't know, 
ma'am. Teacher — Well, if your 
papa gave your mother $10 to go 
and buy a new hat, what would 
your mother do? Tommy — Have 
a fit, I guess. 

— That a woman who has to be 
mother-in-law to four men can't 
be very objectionable to any one 
of them. Her duties will be too 
diffuse, don't you know, to be 
rigidly discharged. 

Missionary — Why did you de- 
pose your last king? Native — He 
had a colored man at his palace 
for luncheon. Missionary — ? Na- 
tive — And it's not considered good 
form here to eat anybody but white 
men. , 

"Don't you wish you were as 
smart as Conan Doyle's detective? ' 
"My dear sir," replied the modern 
detective, "if they'd let me plan the 
crimes in the first place, I could dis- 
cover the facts in ways quite as ex- 
traordinary as those of any detec- 
tive that an author ever put into 
a book." 

Magistrate— There was no rea- 
son for you to assault this man 
and break his camera because he 
tried to take a snap-shot at you. 
What else did he do? Prisoner — 
Nothing, your Honor. He pressed 
the button, and I did the rest. 

"So you want to be my son-in- 
law, do you?" asked the stern pa- 
rent, with as much fierceness as 
he could generate. "Can't say that 
I do," replied the truthful young 
man. "But I want to marry your 
daughter, and I suppose there's no 
way to dodge the issue." 

Aubrey— Youah daughtah has 
consented to mawry me, and — er — 
I'd like to know if there is any in- 
sanity in youah family? Old Gen- 
tleman (emphatically) — There 
must be. 

"I want a picture book for a chil 1 
of two years." "One that cannot bs 
torn, perhaps?" "No; the poor 
child might strain itself tearing it 
up !" 



35 
the 



During The early da- 
Manhattan I 
New \ ork, the trains did n 

on bunday. < Ine Sunday morning, 
ignorant of this fact, a tr: 
rushed up to the stairway, onl) 
find the gates closed. Noticing the 
letters, "M E. K. R." over the en- 
trance, he said in disgusted tones : 
"1 might have known that a 
odist Episcopal Railroad wouldn't 
run on Sundays." 

. .She was magnificent in ball at- 
tire. "By what right, sir, do you 
tell me 1 shall not wear this 
gown?" she demanded, with flash- 
ing eyes. "Before we were mar- 
ried, your old father asked me if I 
could keep you in clothes, and I as- 
sured him I could," replied he, 
and met her look of high defiance 
with a look of steady determina- 
tion. 

Teacher — Now, Homer, a hus- 
band gives his wife ten dollars to 
go down and buy a four-dollar 
muff, a two dollar plume and a fifty 
cent veil. What does she bring 
back? Homer — Sixteen different 
complexion soaps, a basket of 
health foods, and a bill for seven 
dollars for a spring jacket. 

Doctor — What you need is a 
change of climate. Patient — A 
change of climate! Why, I've never 
had anything else. If the climate 
would only stay the same two days 
running I think I would be all 
right. 

Fame is very easily acquired. All 
you have to do is to be in the right 
place at the right time, and do the 
right thing in the right way — and 
then advertise it properly. 

"What is the difference between 
fur and fir?" inquired the cat of the 
pine tree. "The difference between 
'u' and 'i'," replied the pine tree. 

Mrs. Strongley — John, mother is 
coming to spend a week with us. 
Mr. Strongley — Thunder and light- 
ning! Mrs. Strongley — No, just 
reign. 



60 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 

Designs 

Copyrights &c. 

Anyone Bending a sketch and description ma? 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly contidenllal. HANDBOOK on Patents 
Bent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

PatentB taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific flmericait 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any Hdentlflc Journal. Terms, $3 a 
year; four months, $1. Soldbyall newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 36,B '° ad ^. New York 

Branch Office, 626 F St., Washington, D. C. 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 14, 1905. 



HAND 

SAPOLIO 

FOR TOILET AND BATH 

It makes the toilet something to be en- 
joyed. It removes all stains and roughness . 
prevent* prickly heat and _ charing, and 
leaves the skin white, soft, healthy. In the 
bath it brings a glow and exhilaration wh ich 
no common soap can equal, imparting the 
vigor and life sensation of a mild Turkish 
bath. All Grocers and Druggists. 



Suspicious Purchaser — Here ; 
you said this was a Shanghai 
chicken. It's a common little Leg- 
horn. Slippery Sambo — 'Deed, 
boss, you mus' 'a' misunderstood 
me, 'case I didn't say dat at all. De 
onlies' thing I saw was dat it was 
a shanghaied chicken, an' I guess 
yo' all done suspect dat befo' I tole 

. vo • 

Myer — Yes, in order to get away 
unobserved, he resorted to a sub- 
terfuge. Gyer — I see. He's a sort 
of subterfugitive, as it were. 

"Awful crush at the concert?" 
"Yes — at the door — going out !" 

Cook (to new maid listening to 
her mistress playing the piano) — 
Can you do that? Maid (appalled) 
— Do I have to do that? In my 
last place the mistress always did 
it herself! 

"Would you take a chicken, real- 
izing that it didn't belong to you?" 
"No," answered Mr. Erastus Pink- 
ley. "But when you sees a chicken 
roostin' right in reach you's mighty 
liable to stop realizin' an' take- 
things foh granted." 

Samson had just slaughtered a 
few hundred thousand Philistines 
with the jawbone of an ass. 
"There," he said, as he wiped his 
brow. "I guess that will stand as 
the record till Tom Lawson gets 
after Wall street." So saying, he 
settled down and waited for the 
call of "Next!" 




<jx ALL TBE YEAR 
A ROUND TOURS 



Travel by Sea 



excellent Service, Lgw Rites, Including Berth and Men'! 



LosAneeles San Diego Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Taenma 

Victoria Vancouver F.te. 

And to those desiring longer trips to 
Alaska and Mexico. 

For Information regard Inz sailing dates etc., obtain folder 

SAN FRANC 00 TICKET IIFF'CFS 
« New Montgomery St. (Palace !!.•'■ 1) 
10 Market St. . and Broadway WtlM" es. 

0. D. DTJNANN. General Passei per Agent 
10 Market Street. San Francisco 



"Ah!" sighed the sentimental 
maid. "I could sit and gaze at the 
moon for hours." "Would I were 
the man in it," said the callow 
youth who was helping her to hold 
down the rustic seat on the lawn. 
"Same here," she replied, wearily. 
"Then you would be nearly 240,- 
000 miles away." 

"Young man," said Mr. N. Peck, 
"you will never know what real 
bliss is until you have a home of 
your own." "Eh?" said the young 
man, astonished at such a remark 
from such a source. "Fact. Nobody 
but a man situated as I am can 
properly appreciate the delights of 
going up to town for a few hours 
of glorious liberty." 



M.tf.v.v.MMv'.v.ir.vxir.-tr.if.xMVir.tr.tr.ir.int. 

$ ^iL^ Suits 




.W.W.W.H.W. 

15 



i Samplaa Sant 
i Fra, 



Dressy Suits $20 

Pants $4.50 
My $25.00 Suits are thejS 

best in America. S 
Per Cent Saved by get-fc 
ting your suit made by* 

JOE POHEIM £ 

TBE TAUOB K 

1110-1112 Market St 5 
201-203 Montg'y St.. $. F.P 



25 



2 ""■- 201-203 Montg'y St.. S. F.S 



"Have you any stove-lifters?" 
"You will find the derrick depart- 
ment in the basement." 




iTSrrt-"*- Coast Lime 



SAN FRANCISCO. 

r*OM OOTQIII 28. 1M1 

Fkkkt Dxror 
(Toot of Market Strst*.) 



Narrow Gauge 

(Foot of Market ritre«rtl 



Ial»J 



MAIN LINE. 



7 00a Vscavllle. Winter*, Kunney.... 
7.00a Rentcia, Eirairaand Sacramento.. 

7 30a Vallejo, Napft, Cnllstoga, Santt 

Rosa, Martinez. Sao Kamon 

f 30a NUeB.Tracy. Latbrop, Stockton.... 

8 00a Shasta Express— (Via Davis). 

William*, Willows, tFruto. Ked 
- - BlutT. Portland, Tacoina, Seattle 

8 00a navU.Woodland.Knlghta Landing, 
MaryBvllle. Orovllle 

8-30- Martinez. Antloch. Byron, Tracy. 
Stockton, Newman, Lob Banoa, 
Mendota. Armona, H no ford, 
Vlsalla. Porteryllle ... 

8-30a lort CoBta. Modesto, Merced, 
Fresno, Goshen Janctton, Han- 
ford. Vlsalla. Bakeratleld 

8 30a Nlles, San Jose, Llvermore. Stock- 

ton , (t-MUton), lone, Sacramento, 

Maryavllle, Chlco. Ked Bluff .... 

8.30a Oakdale. Chinese, Jamestown. 80- 

nora, Tuolumne and Angels 

9 P0a AHnnileKxpress— Ogden and Bast. 
1.30a Richmond, Marlines and Way 

Stations 

1000A The Overland Limited — Ogden. 
Oinutm. Chicago, Denver, Kansai 

City. St. Louis 

■ T.OOa Vallejo 

It.ObA Lo* Angelas Passenger— Port 
Costa, Martfce*. Ilyron, Tracy, 
Latbrop. Stockton. Merced, 
Raymond, Fresno. Ooshi-n Juno- 
tlon, Hnnfurd, Lemoore, Vlsalla, 

Bakerafleld. Los Angeles 

1200m Hay ward. Nlles and Way Stations. 
11. OOP Smmmento Klver Steamers. 

3. SOP Ban Ida, Winters. Sacramento, 
Woodland. Knlghta Lauding, 
Marysvllle, Orovllle and way 
stations 

J.3PP Hay word. Nlles and Way Stations.. 

5 30p PoiiCoftta, Martinez, Byrou.Tracy, 
Latbrop, btockton, Modesto, 
Merced, Berenda, Fresno and 
Way Stations beyond Port Costa 

4. OOP Mart Inez. San ltamon.Vallejo.Napa, 
CallstoKa, Santa Husa 

4 OOP Nlles. Tracy, Stockton 

430p Hay ward, Nlles, Irvlngton, San I 
Jo*" 1 . Llvermore I 

6-OOp The Owl Limited— Nuwmnn. Los 
HHtiuR. Meuduta. FreBno. Tulare, 

HakeraOeld.Loi Angeles 

tE 30p liny ward. Nlles and sun Jose 

6.00 p Hay ward. Nlles and San Jose 

I.OOp Eastern Express— Omaha, Chicago, 

Denver. Kansas City, St. Louis, 
Martinez. Stockton. Sacramento. 
Colfax, Reno, Sparks, Muntello, 

O-den 

8.00p Valk'Jo, dally, except Sunday.... I 

7 -OOP Valleju, Sunday only f 

7 00p hichuiond, San Pablo, Port Costa, 

Mnrtlnei and Way Stations 

700pR>uo Passenger— Port Costa, Be- 
nlcla, Sulsun, Elmlra, Dixon, 
Dnvlfl. Sacramento, Sparks, Tono- 
pab, Keeier and Way Station-.., 
B.OBp Oregon &, California Express— Sao- 
ramento, Marysvllle, Redding 
Portland, Pugat Sound and East. 

1.1 Op Hay ward, Nlles and San Jom (Sw 

day oaly) . 



7 BOP 
7.20P 

820- 
7.20P 

7-80P 

7-60P 



«.20p 
4.50P 

4.20P 

4-20P 
620p 

8.B0P 



820P 

12.20P 



7.20P 

3.20p 

hi.qjp 



1050a 

7 60p 



12-20* 

920a 

1020a 

18.60a 
111.60a 



8.60a 
7.20a 
9-bOA 



12.60P 

7.60P 

11.20a 



6 16a Newark. Ceotervlllr. Bam Jose, 

Felton, Boulder Creek, BanU 

# Cruz and Way Stations SM5i» 

t216p Newark, Ceutervllle, San Jose, 
New Aimaden.Loa GHtos.Felton, 
Boulder Creek, Santa Crui and 
Principal Way Stations t10 55a 

4. IIP Newark, San Jose, Los Oatos...] ^ t866A 
«C 3iP Hunters' Train fSoturday only)— 

San Jose and Way Stations !7-26p 

COAST LINE (Rroad Uauga). 
I •*" 1 I ulrd ana Town wend Streets.) 
TT A san Jose and Way Stations 

7 1 , A San Jone und Way Stations 

t Ola N- w Almnden (Tues.. Frld.. only), 
b OCa 1 be Cua-ter— SaD Jose, Salinas, 

Ban Ardo, Paso Robles, Santa 
Margarita, San Luis Obispo, 
Guadalupe, Gnv1ota, Santa Bar- 
bara, San Buenaventura. Mon- 
t»lvo. Oxnard, Uurbank, Los 

Angeles 

g.OOAGtlr-.y. Ihdltster. Caatrov tile. Del 
M .i.tc. Pacific Urove, Surf, Lom- 

poc 

B 00a bhti Jobo. Tres PlnoB,Watnonvllle, 
C»idlola. Santa Cruz, P.tHno 
limve, Salinas San Luis Obispo 
nnd Prluclp*. Wiiy StHtlons. ... 

IC 7f a tan Jose and Way Stations 

H . i A Sun Jose mid Way bullous 

2 gF miii JoBe and Way Stations 

o LLP Del Monte Kxpreaa— Sauta Clara, 
han Jose, Wm tBon v 1 lie, Santa 
Cruz. Del Monte, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove 

'3.00P L"B GatoB. Wright. Boulder Creek, 
Sun tu Cruz, via Santa Clara and 

Narrow Gauge 

5-3CP Valencia St., South San FranclBco, 
Iturllngame, San Jose, Gllroy, 

Holllater, Tres Plnos 

A 30p an Jo»e and Way Stations 

tl .00p Santa Clara, bxn Jose, Los Gatoi, 
and principal Way Stations (ex- 
cept Sunday) 

(62 Op eimJosi- and Principal Way Stations 
butp buiisi'l Kxpreas. — Redwood. San 
JoBC.GlIroy. Salinas, PaaoKoblea, 
San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, 
Los Angeles, Doming. Kl Paso, 
SI.LouIb. New Orleans, NewTork 
6.46p Pajaro, WntBonvllle, Ca pi tola, 
Santa Cruz, Castrovllle, Del 

Monte, Pacific Grove 

1 6- 1 5 h »>• MaLeo,Beresford,Belmont,8an 
Carlos. Redwood, Fair Oaks, 

Menlo Parle. Palo Alto 

8 30p 8»n Jose and Way Stations 

6 L0p P*1o Alto and Woy Stations 

11 .o0p Soutb San Francisco. MIllbrae.Bnr 
iinnaine. San Mateo, Belmont, 
ban Carlos, Redwood, Fair Oaka, 

Menlo Park, and Palo Alto 

a!130» Maytleld, Mountain View, Bonny- 
vale, Lawrenoa, Banta Clara aad 
Ban Jose. 



8.30P 
B.40p 
4.1 OP 



10.30P 
10.30P 



410p 
1.20P 
7.30P 

8 38 a 



12-1BP 

f 10.45a 



1045a 
tBOOA 



t900A 
.940A 



910a 
10.30P 



tt.48A 

6.38a 
10-liA 



tt.48# 
»-48p 



740a 

8.10a 

11*04 



A for Morning. P for Aftsmooa, 

1 Bunday «xc«pt«4 1 Bnnday only 

1 baturday only. • Monday only. 

-ia ai all statloms oh Bnnday. 
~ " IKANMKK COMPANY 



will call for • 



MON 1KAKM-KK CliMFANI 
and ofceak ss||t|« tram kotaU «M r**- 
issa — s, Bi.K i o * 



BYRON MAUZY 

Received Gold Medal— Highest Award World's Fa; 



pianos war r&L, 

Sohmor Piano Agency 

308-J12 Pos< St.^an Francisco 

r. St. Louis. 1904. 



BUSH ®> MALLETT CO. 



INCORPORATED 




Bush & Mallett Co., one of the best-known firms in the city, occupy a large portion of the ground 
floor of the Crossley Building, their entrances being at 618 Mission street and from 115 to 119 Jessie 
street. They are wholesale and retail dealers in mantels, grates, tiles, fire-place and bathroom furniture 
and parquetry hardwood floors. At the factory, corner Sixth and Bluxome streets, there are manufa:- 
tured wood mantels, sideboards, bookcases, wood grilles, parquetry floors and other hardwood finish. 

The business of Bush & Mallett Co. has increased to such an extent that they became so cramped for 
room and shipping facilities they were obliged to move from 328 Post street to the more commodious 
quarters they now occupy. The growing importance of Mission street as a business center largely en- 
tered into the consideration of the move and no better location for their business could be selected than 
the Crossley Building, almost in the shadow of the Palace and Grand Hotels. The new apartments have 
been elaborately fitted up, regardless of expense. From Mission to Jessie street is a succession of show- 
rooms, displaying the wares of the firm. They are fitted up in various tints, with rugs to match, the ar- 
rangement being designed to best show oft the goods on exhibition, and the rooms are lighted and heated 
by electricity. The shipping facilities are the very b?st and assure the most prompt delivery. 



618 Mission Street 



115-119 Jessie Street 



Price per Copy. 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY ao, 1856. Annual Subscription, $4.00 




DTER 



(tfaliforuia 



sex* 




Vol. LXX. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JANUARY ai, 1905. 



Number 3. 



Ths SAN FRANCISCO NEWa LETTER la printed and published 
•very Saturday by tba proprietor. Frederic Marriott, Halleck 
Building. X30 Sa.naome street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Entered at San Francisco Poslofflce as second class matter 

New York Office— iwhere Information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising)— 3u6 Broadway, C C. Murphy. 
RspresentaUve. 

London offlce— » Cornhlll. E. C. England. George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than • a. m. 
Thursuay previous to day of Issue. 



People who thinK Boston belongs in the list of 
"wide open" towns need only to point to "Tom" 
Lawson's mouth for proof. 



Wanted. — Extra large machine for spraying white- 
wash on smooth or rough hoards. Call after dark at 
City Hall and ask for E. E. S. 



Cherries are ripening in California in midwinter, 
while in the blizzardy East nothing comes to a head 
just now save the humble chillblain. 



A high-salaried beauty expert tries to tell a large 
woman how to look small. The biggest female feels 
small when she confronts a mutinous cook-lady. 

What with joy over a "Senator from the South" 
and more rain than she has had in a long time, Los 
Angeles may be forgiven for ejaculating "whee !" 

Open-work hosiery is blamed for an epidemic of 
grip in Des Moines. Iowa fashions must be funny — 
open-work stockings and ear-muffs ! 

The President and his "distinguished private citi- 
zen" friend from New York are so fond of each other 
that careless people may be excused for calling them 
Riisvelt and Roos. 



Another United States Senator having been elected 
by a free and untrammeled Legislature, prominent 
citizens are figuring on the gold brick possibilities for 
the next time out. 



William R. Hearst has been presented with a lit- 
tle bill. This is not a stork item ; it relates to a suit 
against him for work done in sending out circulars 
during his campaign of foolishness. 

Sacramento sportsmen are about to organize a sys- 
tematic jay-shooting expedition. Anybody who has 
ever sojourned in the State capital will know that 
the shooters need not go outside the city limits. 

That dare-devil of the "bloody ground," Colonel 
Jack Chinn, goes to jail for ten days upon conviction 
of carrying a "gun !" Kentucky must be getting ready 
for the early arrival of the millenium. 

The Kaiser wants an exchange of lecture service 
between German and American professors. Well, let 
us send him our Jordan, to be followed up by a dozen 
"professional" keepers of fashionable boarding- 
houses. 



It turns out that there was plenty of everything left 
in Port Arthur except sand. 



Editor Hearst cries out against nun who sa} 
"Bah!" William simply cannot forget St. Louis. 

The daughter of Krupp, the cannon-maker, is re- 
ported engaged, but there is disappointment in ( ier- 
inany because she did not select a bigger gun. 

The "gentleman from Africa" who has been made 
Collector of Customs in Charleston, S. C, is said to 
be a very white sort of man — except his skin. 

Schmitz and Company believe in relation in office 
— that is, they want to do the relating. He and his 
crew should go into the gall business. They could 
supply any demand. 

The discovery of a serum which makes man proof 
against weariness may do away with the tramp evil 
and the rest cure, but please to consider what harm 
it will work when the chronic bores get hold of it. 

Chauncey Depew, defending international mar- 
riages in the Senate, says that the "title generally 
chases the girl." He presents no statistics to show 
how fast the girl runs. 

Secretary Taft's plan to prohibit the importation 
of opium in the Philippines is another blow at the 
very source and fountain-head of yellow journalism's 
"inside information." 



President Harper, of Chicago University, an- 
nounces it as his solemn belief that men are naturally 
untrustworthy. This sounds like the dictum of an old 
woman — and a married one at that. 



Speaker Prescott, of the State Assembly, who was 
one of the first statesmen to find out which was really 
the band-wagon and climb into it, demands a chance 
to prove that he didn't "throw down" his friend Bard 
— as if that would ease the pain of Bard's bruises ! 

The chaplain of the Senate reports that his pocket 
was picked in the Assembly chamber at Sacramento. 
This is a painful revelation, inasmuch as heretofore 
the houses of the Legislature have not preyed upon 
each other. 



Chicago is said to be worrying about microbes in its 
napkins. Recalling the unkind things that have been 
said about Lake City table manners, we suggest that 
alarm might be removed by making the napkins of 
rubber. 



The most interesting disclosure in the Smoot in- 
quiry thus far is as to the misfit underclothes that 
serve as wedding garments for those who go through 
the Endowment House. According to the descrip- 
tion of witnesses, they would make a "mother hub- 
bard" look like a well-tailored gown. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE WYMAN CASE. 

Hope for a purging of the sickness that has done 
San Francisco almost to death is revived by the com- 
paratively speedy and absolutely uncompromising 
verdict in the Wyman case. The freebooters who 
misgovern the city had reason to expect and to pro- 
phesy a different outcome. They knew the potency 
of perjured testimony. Beside that, they relied upon 
the use of threats and bribes to pull down the wit- 
nesses for the prosecution. Beyond that, they had 
a third line of defense, which was the belief that the 
jury could be '"reached." Moreover, they were certain 
that they could, by delays and by the clouding and 
confusing of the issues, tire out the public and the 
prosecution. But they did not reckon with a judge 
so stern, so acute and so tireless, as William P. Law- 
lor. It is doubtful if they ever entertained any idea 
that they could swerve him from the plain path of his 
duty, for none better than the gangster knows the 
kind of man Lawlor is, but they learned early in the 
struggle that it would go ill with the one of them who 
was caught even winking at a juror. And they found, 
too, that he did not intend that many and long-con- 
tinuances should come between justice and its ap- 
pointed ends. He was willing, and even anxious, 
to hold court night and day, and all the time he kept 
the detense jammed against his bar of justice, ruling 
carefully, and firmly, so that there might be no wan- 
dering from the issue, and yet so that the record 
might be too clear for a higher court to quibble over. 

Fortunately, also, it fell out that this jury was both 
honest and level-headed. Upon it the petty deceits 
and the gross perjuries of the defense were wasted. 
Indeed, there could be no doubt in any reasonable 
mind, after the prosecution had closed its case, that 
the defendant, Wyman, known also as "Maestretti's 
bartender," was guilty of fraudulent voting at the 
August primary. No other defense than one founded 
upon false statements and false pleas was possible. 
At the very outset, the bigger rascals who made a 
felon of Wyman were caught in the act of trying to 
ring in on the committee magistrate a double of the 
stupid tool, who had served them only too well. 1 lad 
such a trick been attempted in the trial court, one 
does not need more than a single guess at what would 
have happened to the tricksters. 

But in the trial court, the despairing administra- 
tionists did try to prove an alabi for the stupid, stolid 
defendant. A herd of alibi witnesses was lashed up 
to the stand to perjure themselves by swearing that 
Wyman could not have done what Fairfax Wheelan 
and other reputable citizens saw him do, because he 
was not there. Meanwhile, the defense had been busy 
seeking to intimidate the persons under subpoena by 
the prosecution. All it succeeded in doing was to get 
itself exposed once more. 

Trickery failed, perjury failed, intimidation failed. 
The facts and the law were plain, and in less than 
two hours of deliberation, the jury found a verdict 
against Wyman that ought to bring him on sentence 
day a five-year term in a penitentiary. 

And this is only the beginning. Two more admin- 
istration tools, Steffens and Rebstock, await trial for 
frauds and other lawlessness committed in this same 
primary election. Nobody has found bail for Steffens, 
a fireman who hired himself out to an administration 
agent for any dirty work that was needed. He sup- 
posed, when he was caught, a fugitive from justice, 
and the public supposed that Public Works Commis- 
sioner Maestretti, the employer and bail-finder of 
Wyman, would furnish cash or bonds for his release, 
but Steffens, for some reason, is still in jail. Reb- 



January 21, 1905. 

stock, another Maestretti man, and an employee of the 
Board of Public Works, is at large, with Maestretti 
as his real surety. Both these men are likely to be 
convicted, the cases against them being not less 
strong than that against Wyman. But these sacri- 
fices will not do. Justice and an outraged commun- 
ity want more than the punishment of these small 
rascals. The sanctity of the ballot and the safety of 
the State demand the smoking out of the arch-scoun- 
drels who hired these cheap criminals. Behind Wy- 
man and Steffens and Rebstock are the men who 
hired them to steal the primary and told them how 
to do it. Behind these others, again, are the master 
knaves. There is no need to name them. Everybody 
who knows that there was a crooked primary knows 
who made it crooked. The conviction of Wyman 
only opens the way to those behind him "and to 
those still up." We are beginning to believe now 
that the seemingly impossible may be accom- 
plished, and that we shall yet see in the dock the com- 
manders of the pirate crew, the chief rascals in a reign 
of rascality. 

A -fresh, and, presumably sound accusation, has 
brought the Board of Election Commissioners into 
court again, on the criminal charge of "willful and 
corrupt misconduct" during, and with relation to the 
infamous primary of August. The only penalty that 
this procedure can bring to them is removal from of- 
fice. We had hoped for an indictment, out of which 
might have come convictions of felony, but it will be 
worth while if these unworthies can be booted out of 
office. With Wyman, Steffens and Rebstock in 
prison, or on the road thither, and with Voorsanger, 
Devoto, Leffingwell, Roberts and Maguire forcibly 
removed from perilous proximity to the election ma- 
chinery, the field will be clear for hunting down the 
leaders of the wolf pack. 

A QUESTION OF SPECIAL PRIVILEGE. 

It is to be hoped that the wise men in Assembly 
and Senate chambers at Sacramento, will devote ma- 
tured sense and deliberate justly in regard to the new 
game laws it is proposed to enact at this session. The 
agitation in California is part and parcel of a general 
campaign in all Western States to enact the laws of 
the East, wdiich make it impossible for the average 
citizen to partake in game food of any kind. It is 
proposed to rain the bills in profusion on the devoted 
heads of the Legislators, and then out of all the con- 
fusion piece out a bill that will restrict the duck and 
the snipe to the use of the rich man only. This cam- 
paign is engineered by the members of gun clubs and 
preserves, and the idea is to restrict the killing of 
game to these reservations for the pleasure of mem- 
bers, and for the use of no one else. 

Duck and snipe and other marsh birds are to disap- 
pear from the average citizen's table. He will look 
upon the succulent mallard as a rarity to be enjoyed 
by members of gun clubs only. In another genera- 
tion, roast duck will be looked upon as a prehistoric 
dish, and classed by the public among such ancient 
animals as the pterodactyls and the elephas primi- 
genius. 

The duck is a migratory bird, and any law that 
compels hunters to shoot them for their personal use 
alone, and does not allow them to be sold in the mar- 
ket, is manifestly unjust, and partakes of sumptuary 
legislation for the benefit of the few to the detriment 
of the many. The duck is one of the delicacies, easily 
within our reach during the open season, and no 
legislation should compel a deprivation of the pleas- 
ure of purchasing the duck in open market at such 
times. 



January ii, 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

RUEF— SCHMITZ— EXAMINER— CALL. 



It is not surprising to find the Examiner cl 
allied with the villa >chinitzism and Km 

That lias always been Hearst's game — to preach re 
form ami practice corruption. As a public watch- 
irks loudly enough at honest passers-by, 
ami is raiding the larder while the thieve- are busy in 
the house. His disestcemed newspaper has little 
• about the exposed crookedness '>i the munici- 
pal administration, ami that little is said with a cau- 
tion ami circumspection that evinces a lively distaste 
for such probings. The truth is. that the Examiner 
tears, ami has good reason to fear, a turning of the 
searchlight in its own direction. It dreads, most 
naturally, an inquiry which may at any time uncover 
its own direct participation in the scandalous events 
of last summer, when Hearst tried for and failed to 
secure control of the local Democratic party. 

Hut a public which has grown used to the Exami- 
ner's uncloaked knavery cannot help wondering at 
the apparent indifference of the (all toward the 
movement which is gathering headway every day 
for a sweeping reform of our municipal Government. 
The proprietor of the Call belongs, by faith and by 
his professions, to the side of the decent citizen. Why, 
then, docs his newspaper gloss over the conditions 
that are heing proved in court in the cases against 
the administration? Why does it exhibit all the 
symptoms of an administration in treating of the in- 
famous appointments that Ruef and Schmitz are mak- 
ing? Why does it not use the powerful influences at 
its command to flog the rogues out of the City Hall? 

There have been rumors, intimations, and even 
direct and published charges that somebody has bar- 
gained away to Ruef and Schmitz the measurable 
support of the Call in this crisis of their affairs. This 
we can scarcely credit. It is not to be believed that 
for any office or for all the offices in the municipality 
the rich and respected citizen who controls the Call 
would trade the support or the silence of his news- 
paper. The public is waiting for him to proclaim 
through the Call his hostility toward the worst ad- 
ministration San Francisco has ever endured. 



SOCIALISTIC SACRILEGE. 

Eugene V. Debbs can always be relied upon to say 
the right thing at the right time to warn the public 
of the danger to individual rights and liberties that 
lurk in his economic fallacies. Debbs is the recog- 
nized leader of political socialism in this country, and 
therefore his utterances voice the sentiments of the 
socialistic school of visionary economics. Like the 
lily, Debbs toils not, neither does he spin, except with 
his tireless jaw. In short, Debbs lives and moves and 
has his being on the top shelf of plenty, where he is 
maintained in luxurious manual idleness by money 
filched from credulous wage earners. 

Debbs' latest utterance is in the nature of a "puff" 
for the late Martin Irons, but in reality he uses the 
Irons incident to insult the Christian world. His 
Hall of Fame includes only such as he considers the 
world's greatest socialists, and the greatest of them 
all in history are "Martin Irons, John Brown, Owen 
Lovejoy and Jesus Christ." Could any one suggest 
how a more vicious and depraved contempt for the 
world's Savior could be expressed than associating 
His name with that of Martin Irons? And who was 
Martin Irons whom this sacriligious socialistic agi- 
tator places upon a pedestal of even height of that 
upon which civilization, without respect to creed, 
has placed the Lord Christ? In 1886 Martin Irons 
was the trusted and respected head of a Machinists' 
Union. A dispute arose between the Iron Mountain 



Railway and certain of its ,,.,,.; . | r ,, n _ 

siiaded the union men empli , v |,, 

strike. He was made "man.. 

cisely as Debbs was in t hicago. On ■ 

the strike Irons not onlj lost Ins head, hi- 
ssed with the insane notion that thi 

bring the railway company to terms was ;■ 

its property. At this, a large majority of tin- union', 
involved protested, and refused to countenance any 

thing of the sort. But they were 11.it needed by Irons 
to carry out his programme of destruction. By this 
time St. Louis was over-run with thugs ami toughs 
from other cities, and then came days of rioting, of 
of assassination, of train wrecking, of car and Station 

burning, and of plundering of private residences. All 

the roads centering in St. Louis were involved, and 

.Martin Irons, in a state of hatred of ".corporatiqns" 
bordering on frenzy, encouraged all kinds of lawl 
iKss. The lau finally assei ted itself in a way that 
crushed Irons and his rioters. The unions we're too 
>lo\\ in repudiating Irons, and public sentiment 
turned against them. Irons became a wanderer. Em- 
ployers of machinists would not employ him because 
he would persist in preaching socialism in its worst 
form. A short time ago he died in an obscure town 
in Texas, without friends and without money, practi- 
cally an outcast because of his hatred of everything 
that encouraged men to accumulate individual' prop- 
erty holdings. And this is the man that chief socialist 
Debbs places in the Hall of Fame on a parity with the 
world's greatest manifestation of the Deity in human 
form. But all socialists are alike in this as in every- 
thing else. 



A TRUE PHILANTHROPIST. 

We are occasionally accused of being general 
grumblers and of acting as if nothing were worth 
trusting, and the majority of men simply engaged in 
furthering their own schemes and imposing on the 
public. This attitude to which we plead guilty as a 
general statement is the result of long observation of 
life in the metropolis of the Pacific Coast. But when 
we meet a man who has really proved his worth, and 
that he is able to accomplish things with a whole 
heart, we take off our hat to hini. So we bid Jacob 
Riis welcome to our city, and are glad to recognize 
in him a sane and whole-hearted reformer who does 
not merely pay a lip service to the ideals which he 
professes to worship. An honest man is rare enough, 
Heaven knows, but an honest philanthropist ! A 
Happy New Year to you, Jacob Riis, and thanks 
for the visit. 



GERMANY AND THE TRUSTS. 

The trust ghost is haunting the shores of Germany, 
where the polysyllabled professors who have written 
the most tedious and least useful treatises on politi- 
cal economy, stand aghast at its approach. Herr 
Moeller, the Finance Minister, says that he is not 
opposed to great consolidations of capital, which are 
rendered necessary by modern industrial conditions, 
but the great thing is to have the right men at the 
head of them. Which is, after all, the opinion of 
most sensible men on this side. It is to be hoped 
that Germany will improve on our experience in find- 
ing the right men. Herr Moeller warns his country- 
men, by the way, against the American system, but 
that is the only one. they will get. 

The French foreign office has ordered all its em- 
ployees to shave, their upper lips. Salary warrants, 
on the other hand, must not be sent to the barber's, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE EMERYVILLE CRIME-FACTORY AGAIN. 

The News Letter calls the attention of the minis- 
ter and the priest, the police and the civil authorities, 
the high-minded citizen and the man of sense, to 
the fact that last week it was Nuenaber who disap- 
peared with money belonging to his employers and 
to the Odd Fellows. 

This week, Emile Formus is branded a criminal 
by being arrested on a charge of theft of a diamond 
ring from a friend in Los Angeles. Here is what the 
"Call" has to say on the matter: 

"Oakland, Jan. 15. — Emile Formus, who was ar- 
rested yesterday morning at Golden Gate station of 
the Berkeley broad-gauge line on demand of the Los 
Angeles police, proves to be a young Russian who has 
ruined himself by his devotion to racetrack gambling. 
After squandering an inheritance recently received 
from a relative in Russia, ne became a thief in order 
to continue his efforts to break the "bookies." He is 
now on his way to Los Angeles to be tried for his 
crime. Formus stole a $300 diamond ring in Los An- 
geles from Mrs. S. D. Parker. She and her husband 
had formerly employed Formus at their hotel at 
Hollywood, a suburb of Los Angeles. They implicit- 
ly trusted the young man. While in the Parkers' 
employ, Formus received $5,000 from his home in 
Russia, the remittance representing his share in a 
relative's estate. Immediately he quit work, deciding 
he could make a fortune by "playing the races." He 
went to Ascot Park, and tried until the last cent was 
gone. He had volubly admired Mrs. Parker's valu- 
able gem, and told her he intended to buy it. Thus 
he learned where she kept the circlet. One day, af- 
ter he had been examining the diamond, the owner 
missed it. Inquiry revealed that Formus had also 
disappeared. The Los Angeles police traced the 
ring to a pawnshop, where it was recovered. Formus, 
with the money he had raised on the gem, came 
to Oakland. At the Emeryville track he lost all but 
$4 of the fruits of his theft. He was arrested on a 
telegraphed warrant from the South." 



The News Letter asks that the community be true 
to itself, and that it give its unending, continual and 
aggressive support to any measure that may be pro- 
posed in the Legislature to obliterate the Emeryville 
Crime-factory. Formus is another pitiful victim of 
bad laws poorly administered, of winking at customs 
that make criminals. 

The daily newspapers of San Francisco dare not 
say as much, but they know it is as we say. One of 
the morning papers is owned by a gentleman who is 
a lover of all kinds of athletic and manly sport. He 
knows, if any one knows, that the element of sport, 
the element of fairness, the decency, and everything 
that goes to make horse-racing one of the most excit- 
ing, and at the same time exhiliarating and delightful 
means of entertainment, have been eliminated. It is 
now a sure-thing game, a means of obtaining money 
under false pretenses. No sane man believes a horse 
is run on its merits at Emeryville, and the proprietor 
of the said morning paper could do a great deal to 
make racing a decent occupation, but he dares not. 
Why? We do not have to know why. We simply 
infer that such is the case, for we know the proprie- 
tor in question is a high-minded gentleman, jealous 
of his class, punctilious in his behavior, and a be- 
liever in the motto of "noblesse oblige." On the 
other hand, the other respectable morning daily is 
owned by a gentleman who gives little or no attention 
to horses, and it is presumed that he has not given 
the matter much thought. We are making this a 
direct appeal to him to give the support of his influen- 



January 21, 1905. 

tial daily to suppress the race track at Emeryville, 
and to remove the temptation from thousands of peo- 
ple who cannot resist. 



It is useless to appeal to the Examiner. That jour- 
nal and its proprietor is long lost to the ranks of 
decency. They seethe in the pit of perdition, fit com- 
panions for the society ot thugs and makers of crimi- 
nals, and they joy in it. 

We appeal to the Archbishop of the Catholic 
Church in this diocese, a public prayer: Archbishop 
Riordan, what have YOU done, and what have the 
priests under your orders done to prevent the mak- 
ing of criminals at Emeryville? We appeal to Bishop 
Nichols of the Episcopal Church: What have you 
and the priests under your orders done to curtail the 
crime-factory and output at Emeryville? 

We ask all those teachers of men, the independent 
and countless pastors of the Congregational, the 
Methodist, the Swedenborgian and other denomina- 
tions, why they have been derelict in their duties, 
why they have not taken steps, through their influ- 
ence, to put an end to the making of criminals at 
Emeryville? 

We appeal to the Legislature, and we point out the 
deficiencies of these keepers of the public morals, and 
we ask the Legislature to take steps to prevent a 
continuation of this festering sore for the breeding of 
hellions, prostitutes, thieves and murderers. 

The News Letter cannot be bought, cajoled, threat- 
ened, brow-beaten, or talked into a support of the 
vilest conspiracy to debauch, prostitute and crimin- 
alize the entire community. 

We do not ask you to join us in the crusade. We 
ask you to begin a crusade yourself. Do it not for 
our sake, but for the sake of your sons and daughters 
— for the sake of decency and for the sake of those 
vet unborn. 



The Statehood Bill is not a favorite with Congress. 
Perhaps it is better so, for would new States not sim- 
ply add to the existing lack of honesty, common 
sense and statesmanship? 

Official scandals are becoming rather frequent. 
Nearly every State and city has an assortment of 
them. 



FAT FOLKS 



I reduced my weight seventy pounds, bust six Inches, waist 
six inches, and hips fourteen Inches In a short time by a guar- 
anteed harmless remedy, without exercise or starving. I will 
tell you all about it. Enclose stamp. Address MRS. E. R. RICH- 
ARDS. 225 EAST NINTH ST.. RIVERSIDE. CALIFORNIA. 




UCHAS KLILUS & CO 

&£XCLUSIVT. 

HIGH Gl^L CLOTHIERS 



Half a century of "Knowing how to make good 
clothes" is the pedigree of makers who make ours. 
This goodness and worth is in every model shown 
here. Our tailoring service is thorough. You can 
depend upon being fitted here correctly. 




TZ7iur/oH7~BJo cAj 



January ai, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




The •■it the Prevention of Cruelt) to Child- 

ren rt-j>.. dderable increase in the number of 

children which ii has been railed upon to protei 

save tViim the hands of vicious or cruel parents. 
I hi- has been a prosperous year, and there is no 
poverty worthy of mention, so that the misfortunes 
of the children must bo in a great measure laid at the 
door of moral delinquency on the part of the parent-.. 
Some action should be possible in such cases in order 
that children may he removed more easily from 
vicious family environment. As the law Stands, 
however, much harm may he done before any effec- 
tive interference is possible. 

A paper which pretends to know something made 
.1 .-care headline the other day. with reference to a 
certain M. Stolken, whose chief claim to fame seems 
to lie in the fact that he decamped with money which 
he had borrowed. This is the general run of things. 
and calls for little comment. What does the editor 
think that the man borrowed the money for? 

Judge Smith, of Santa Cruz, is declared in a me- 
morial to be an able and incorruptible judge, who 
has discharged his official duties to the satisfaction of 
every reputable citizen of the county." This states 
too much. The latter contradicts the former part of 
the statement, unless, indeed, only the disreputable 
go into court in Santa Cruz. 

General Otis has made a fine fight in Los Angeles, 
but his very boldness appears likely to get him into 
trouble. It is just as well to remember that though 
a Grand Jury, generally speaking, closely resembles 
a mule, it also carries out its likeness to that uncer- 
tain quadruped by being able to kick. In fact, its 
hindquarters are stronger than its head. 

Miss Bee Taylor, who says that her lawyer was an 
unknown quantity, thereby showed a deeper and 
more correct appreciation of the legal profession than 
she had any notion of. The fees are not altogether 
unknown, but then they are really so seldom collected 
that they might just as well be so. 

The Sacramento women are saying that working 
in department stores and telephone offices is con- 
ducive to feminine morality, and, in fact, produces 
the best specimens of modern femininity. To the 
experienced, this is simply a slur at other women, 
and no justification of these particular occupations. 

What a joker the City Attorney is, and what a par- 
son he would have made. To say solemnly, as he did, 
"Every city official should give to the accomplish- 
ment of Civil Service his unwavering support and 
honest effort," in face of existing circumstances, re- 
quires all the aplomb of a trained ecclesiastic. 

Oakland is said to be a wide-open town. This is 
dreadful. Fan tan games are running, and all the 
churches and Chinese missionary societies are run- 
ning, but they make poor speed. They had better 
change their Chief of Police; he seems to be a poor 
pace-maker. 

The woman who took a waitress' boa to pay for 
a meal withal, has found the wrong avenue for her 
activities. She should be in the palmist or trance 
medium business. There profits are higher and dis- 
covery more remote. 

Alameda is a funny town. Its chief industries ap- 
pear to be the raising of women's clubs and sea-lions, 
and of the two, the latter are probably the least dan- 
gerous. 



Three get-rich-quick concerns have gi ne to smash 

m one week, and yet the.e i- not the leas! doubt 



that if a dozen 



more were to arise to-morrow, plent) 



of fools would be found to invest money in them. Talk 
about braying fools in a mortar, you in.iv take all 
the) have, and they will come up whining "for von to 
peel off their skins. 

A man, clad in the garb of a mendicant, who drop- 
ped SUddenl] dead in Market street, was found to be 
m possession of money aggregating over four thou- 
sand dollars. Hi- pockets were full of unconsidered 
trilles picked Up in the street. Money making con- 
sists in a -earcb for the dirty and the obvious. 

The crow of the steamer which mutinied at Stock- 
ion the other day must have been drunk. It is much 
safer to be cast ashore on the wild, bleak ocean than 
to l>e .left in desolation among the tides exposed to 
the mercies of the itinerant duck shooter. Surely the 
philanthropical Mr. Furuseth should be able to manu- 
facture a grievance out of this. 

A writ of habeas corpus has been granted to Mrs. 
Botkin. It is one of the most disgraceful episodes 
in the history of San Francisco that this woman 
should be bandied about in this manner. The privi- 
lege of eternal rest should have been bestowed upon 
her long ago. 

The Board of Public Works still wallows in its 
natural infamy. The last member, Egan, has two 
bondsmen who are interested in supplies for which 
the city will probably call for contracts. This is not 
even fair municipal corruption sport; it is loading the 
dice to begin with. 

It comes with a certain shock to learn that the Ep- 
pingers had been indicted. Since their little experi- 
ment so many bigger things have occurred that their 
operations seem almost like the peculations of a 
booby who needs money for cigarettes. 

The police force of Berkeley is about to be re-or- 
ganized. This should strike terror into the heart of 
the genial footpad, but the later news that it is to be 
re-organized out of the same material, will go a long 
way to dispel any anxieties which he may have. 

San Jose is going to show the world that it is not 
hopelessly immoral and corrupt. Bravo, San Jose. 
Tell us how it is done, and we shall be glad to follow. 
But I am afraid we are too deeply in the mire to get 
our clothes clean. 

What is the use of a college course, when it teaches 
such elementary methods. To steal a typewriter and 
pawn it for ten dollars has been done over and over 
again by the commonest sneak thieves in San Fran- 
cisco. We expected better things of Berkeley. 

The absolute obsoleteness of the oath is to be seen 
in the fact that the new Commissioners have taken 
it, but then, on the other hand, it may be urged with 
some truth that they would take anything. 

So the poor tool, Wyman, has been convicted of 
ballot stuffing, but it does not yet appear that any 
punishment will be meted out to the scoundrels who 
employed him and who profited by his action. 

There is far too much talk about all this reform of 
the prisons. What we particularly need at present is 
some security of the conviction of guilty persons and 
their adequate punishment. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
Cupid and Co-Eds 



January ai, 1905. 



By Lady Algy. 

And now comes Stanley Hall, President of Clark 
University, to shoot a bolt at academic culture. With 
fine alliterative scorn, President Halls says that 
higher education is "biologically bankrupt." In other 
words, he fears that university degrees and race sui- 
cide go hand in hand. He sees the joy of parentis lod 
dimmed by the passion for culture. President Hall 
does not play peek-a-boo with the issue. He comes 
right down "front and faces us with the statement 
that "at present our higher education would soon de- 
populate the country if it became universal. As this 
evil is worse with women, and as man unaided by her 
can never hope to solve the problem of her sex, the 
argument for the higher education of the few best 
women is that somehow or somewhere one may arise 
who will find out a new and better way." 

President Hall proves his statement that the evil 
is worse with women than men by presenting sta- 
tistics gathered from the three leading Eastern col- 
leges for women, and weighing. the matrimonial rec- 
ord of these three against the records of nine Eastern 
colleges for men. He finds that twenty years after 
graduation not one-half of the women have married, 
whereas seventy-five per cent of the men of these 
nine colleges are married. "Few marry later than 
twenty years after graduating," says President Hall, 
"and those who do marry at all average only two 
children per marriage, or less than three per cent. If 
civilization is man's self domestication and higher 
education its acme, why should not the test of fertility 
also apply to it as well as to domestication; and if 
our academic youth and maidens are God-chosen 
ones, why should not the Abrahamic promise apply 
to them if they keep covenant with their own na- 
tures?" 

A prophet will have to come out of the East to 
adequately answer the learned interrogator on the 
score of marrying, for on this western run of the 
continent, Cupid and the College Girl get along fa- 
mously. I fancy if we se;k an explanation for the 
fact that California college girls marry in large num- 
bers, we will find that the kernel of the matter lies in 
tin- co-educational nut women-scoffers are trying to 
crack. The Eastern colleges investigated by Stanley 
Hall were none of them co-educational, while the two 
big universities in California are both of that genre. 
Whatever academic faults may be laid at the door 
of co-eduation, there is no doubt that the marriage 
micn.be stalks the the campus of such institutions. 
What is one of the strongest reasons for two peo- 
ple mating? Propinquity, of course. Separate the 
sexes during their impressionable period, and you 
people bachelordom. Throw them together 111 the 
sort of contact a co-educational institution makes 
possible, and the marriage clerk will be kept busy is- 
suing licenses. This is not a plea for co-education— 
let Zithers decide whether co-eds. are excess baggage 
in an institution primarily founded for the intellec- 
tual advancement of men. But if race sterility among 
cultured people reallv looms up as large as President 
Hall believes, it might be wise to grate off the outer 
rind of co-educational evils and see whether there is 
not a layer of good results underneath, chief among 
which is the frequent mating of young men and wo- 
men in the same college. , 
At the last re-union of the alumnae of the < .iris 
High School, an inquisitive young woman took pains 
to find out just how many of the girls in her own par- 




y?pwzzmm! ! 7>rHmm£(rfwmrt!t?tr 



HELLER & FRANK 

1 NCONPon *ti o 

CLOTHIERS 
Are showing 
a large and 
varied assortment 
of PARAGON 
TROUSERS 

MARKET STREET 
AND GRANT AVENUE 




ticular class were still in single harness. To my sur- 
prise, I found, when she told me of her investigation, 
that six out of the ten girls who were married were 
college graduates, the other four having taken a reef 
in their education after finishing the High School. 
This is a higher average, of course, than would hold 
good for all classes, but it may be taken as a marker 
of the marriageable disposition of California college 
girls. 

Personally, I have beard of at least twenty girls in 
the class that graduates from the University of Cali- 
fornia in May, who are engaged to college mates. 
They do not, as a rule, announce their engagements 
until the man has had a chance to shed some of his 
impracticalities and has made a fair start in his 
chosen career. But not infrequently one hears of 
college folk marrying just as soon as they come out 
of the University to make their bow to Mr. World and 
his wife. 

While the California college graduate can plead 
"not guilty" to the charge of eschewing matrimony, 
I do not feel so sure that they could prove that they 
are doing much more than three per cent toward pre- 
venting race sterility. Stanley Hall believes with 
Huxley that an ounce of heredity is worth a ton of 
education, and he would therefore like to see culture 
transmitted through the channel of heredity instead 
of the curriculums of universities. "Are we not losing 
our labor," he asks, "if the educational classes are 
plowed under, and culture is not transmitted into the 
most ancient form of wealth and worth — heredity?" 

It would be interesting to know just how California 
stands in this matter. Perhaps some statistician will 
undertake the task of rating our university-bred peo- 
ple matrimonially, and then we shall know just how 
we stand in the eyes of President Hall. 



Murine as an Eye Tonic 



has won a prominent place on the dressing table of the elite 
restores normal conditions and natural brilliancy to a Faded 
Eye gives comfort to the Tired and Inflamed Eye. 



Tesla Brlciuettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 
foT $7 50 per t"n; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Use Briquettes for 
cooking and heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95. and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



January at, 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

G6« Minister of Foreign Affairs 



If China nn<l Russia 'I" 
China Again on come to blows in the near fu- 
the Stage. ttirc. u will not be the fault of 

the Slav. Bui the tactics of the 
St. Petersburg Governtnenl are too open and plain 
I in all their meaning 1>\ the other 
nations. No doubt China has repeatedly violated her 
neutrality compact, and has in man) ways indirectly 
aided the Japanese, but that is the excuse and not 
the reason of Russia's threat to invade China and per- 
manently occupy certain territory. The statesmen 
of Europe and America understand very well that, 

owing to the almost uninterrupted advance of the 

Japanese, and the growing internal unrest at home, 

Russia's only salvation from still greater humiliation 
in the Far East and still greater dangers at home, 
lies in invading China in .1 way that would involve 

all the nations and cause a world-wide war. And 
should such invasion be ordered, so it is believed in 
circles that should know. England and America would 
be obliged to move promptly to safeguard their own 
interests in Asia. A retreating force of 3,000 of Ku- 
ropatkin's army invaded Chinese territory some days 
ago, and he it so that they were being driven by 
t lyama. and though Chinese territory was their only 
way of escape, it was. in fact, a declaration of war, 
though as yet Peking has taken no notice of it, ex- 
cept to rush still faster that nation's preparations for 
defense. The tone of quite all the semi-official press 
of Europe warrants the belief that next spring is 
likely to see all Europe in a commotion, and troops 
hastening to strategic points. Never before in Great 
Britain's history were her accumulations of pro- 
visions, coal and war supplies so great at colonial 
ports as now, and it means something. Secretary 
Hay is making strenuous efforts to keep China in line, 
but China is always uncertain. 

Concerning the Dardanelles, 
The Dardanelles the Russian Government is be- 
Again, ginning to hedge. It is just 

now dawning upon the Czar 
that if the passage is opened to his Black Sea squad- 
ron, it would be equally open to the ships of other 
nations, if they should conclude to raid the Black Sea 
coast. For this reason, it is not likely that the 
Sublime Porte will be importuned any more by Rus- 
sia to abrogate the Dardanelles treaty. However, 
it is tacitly admitted by the British Admiralty that 
in the event of England becoming involved in the 
Russo-Japanese war, the Mediterranean fleet would 
sail into the Black Sea forthwith, the Sultan to the 
contrary notwithstanding. 

The situation in the war zone 
In the War Zone, is unchanged, except that the 

Port Arthur army is hurry- 
ing to join Oyama at the front, and reinforcements 
are pouring into Kuropatkin's camp. However, the 
weather is too cold to allow field operations, except 
cavalry raids and artillery duels. Still, a day- of 
warmer weather, with indications of a few more of the 
same kind, would be pretty certain to start a general 
engagement, and the Russians would be the attack- 
ing party because a great battle is needed in Man- 
churia to divert the attitude of the restless public at 
home from the efforts that are being made for reforms 
in the Government. Japan is in no hurry to open the 
ball, for China's game and the discontent in Russia 
are playing into her hands; besides, it will take a 
month or so yet for the troops under the last call for 
200,000 of the reserves to reach the front. According 



to the official report of the 1 nil 

ipan, that nation ha- not ram 
ing point ; that supplies of all lands .in- in ab 
that the enthusiasm of the people i- increasing, and 
that the financial resources of ihe empiri 
been at all impaired. \ month ago Japan would 
agreed to a peace agreement on the basis of her re- 
tention of the territory acquired, including Pori Ar- 
thur, but it is undersl 1 that nothing now will be 

accepted short of th,- complete abandonment of all 

Manchuria by the Russian-.. 

Ihe new interpretation 
President Roosevelt given to the Monroe Doc- 
Stirs Things. trine by the Washington 
Government is not I 
received very kindly in Europe. President R 
velt holds that while the right of foreign powers to 
adopt severe measures to collect borrowed money 
and other forms of debt from the Latin-American 
Stales cannot he questioned, their right to seize 
and hold territory until liquidation is made is denied. 
The creditor nations are asking President Roosevelt 
the very pertinent question: "Is not the seizure of 
real property to satisfy a lawful debt a fundamental 
principle of law? And if the creditor may not seize 
and hold as security the property of the debtor Latin 
States, what means do you suggest that will oblige 
them to pay against their will and inclination to pay?" 
Statesmen at home and abroad are wondering how 
the United States can reconcile its position with a 
principle of international law that is as old as civili- 
zation, and which has never before been questioned. 
"What is the good of a writ of execution if the 
sheriff may not levy on property to satisfy the debt?" 
is the question this nation is requested to answer. 
But let us not think for a moment that England's 
recent order for enough 18^-pounder field-guns to 
equip her entire army at home and in the colonies has 
any reference to our new interpretation of a policy 
that Premier George Cannon persuaded the United 
States to adopt more than three-quarters of a century 
ago. 



Germany is growing suspicious of France. The 
Berlin Government, as do all the nations, realize that 
the Russo-Japanese war has reduced the value of 
the Franco-Russian treaty to France by over 
one-half, and that in getting closer to Great 
Britain and the United States, the French nation is 
lessening German influence in the political and diplo- 
matic concerns of France. For a year, at least, the 
Berlin Government has been hinting in almost spoken 
words that it would like stronger assurances that in 
no event would France undertake to disturb Germany 
in Alsace or Lorraine. President Loubet persists 
in refusing to discuss the matter, and now that France 
is leaning towards the Anglo-Saxons, and also is cul- 
tivating "mutual good feeling" with Japan, the Kaiser 
is naturally worried. "The tragedy of Port Arthur" 
is the way General Stoessel is being discussed in 
Europe, and it grows out of the assertion of certain 
Russian military men that Stoessel actually surren- 
dered over 30,000 men fully able for duty, and that 
his ammunition and food supplies were sufficient for 
at least three months longer. 

Draperies, portieres, and the many other fabrics 
used in the home, may be obtained from Geo. T. 
Marsh & Co., 214 Post street. 

John W. Carmany, Chronicle Building, makes 
shirts to order. They are the best to be had for the 
money. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 21, 1905. 



15he Central Agency 



One of the most significant phases of the develop- 
ment of the Charities' Endorsement Committee of 
this city, formed through the co-operation of the As- 
sociated Charities and the .Merchants' Association, is 
the plan for the care of the waif and orphan children 
of this city, and of the State, for that matter. It is 
now taking definite shape, and before long, it is hoped 
to have all the interests of the little unfortunates car- 
ried on through the Central Agency. 

Since Miss Katherine Felton has been in charge of 
the active interests of the Associated Charities, she 
has been putting forward upon all occasions the idea 
of concentration for charities and philanthropies, 
first, because of the economy of administration ; sec- 
ond, because only the best work can be done when 
big intelligence, as well as systematic investigation 
and endeavor are brought to bear on the cases, as 
they come up with too frequent regularity. 

The formation of the Central Agency has just been 
concluded, with Mrs. John F. Merrill at the helm, al- 
though the preliminary work leading up to it has been 
under way for several months. The first step was 
taken shortly after the organization of the Charities 
Endorsement Committee, when the Home Finding 
organizations applied for endorsement, so that they 
would receive consideration when they applied to 
merchants for monthly or yearly subscription. The 
committee refused to endorse these gratuitous or- 
ganizations, representatives of which went up and 
down the State finding homes for abandoned children. 
There were a lot of well-meaning people connected 
with it, but they were irresponsible ; the committee 
could not give the work the stamp of approval. 
Books were loosely kept; there was little money to 
do anything with. It was r.ot possible for the Home 
Finding Society, for lack of means, to visit the child- 
ren after they were placed. It was known that many 
of them were brutally treated, and they were passed 
on from one to another, and finally lost sight of. 

The Associated Charities knew that there was al- 
ways a greater demand for children than there were 
children to be had; they knew that the orphan asy- 
lums were yearly turning out children at the age of 
14. when they should be directed and shielded as far 
as possible from the dangers that beset them at that 
time, if the State would have good citizens instead 
of criminals and paupers. Pending the formation of 
the Central Agency, the Associated Charities and a 
few of the large institutions, having boys and girls 
to dispose of, put Mrs. Isabel Raymond in the field. 
So on this errand of mercy she has been going to the 
uttermost confines of the State with children. They 
are given only to responsible people, and they are 
visited when they are not on "dress parade." so that 
it may be known exactly how the children are living 
their every-day life. The success of Mrs. Raymond's 
work has been more satisfactory than the most san- 
guine expected. The institutions have great confi- 
dence in the plan of the Associated Charities, and 
are giving their children to be placed in homes. 

Every possible phase of dependent child life will be 
the concern of the Central Agency, which is com- 
posed of a number of the most responsible people in 
San Francisco. Outside of the incalculable benefit 
that will accrue to the abandoned and orphan child- 
ren, this formation of the Central Agency is the first 
s'.id toward the concentration and co-operation of 
all sorts of charity work. 

The best people on earth drink OLD KIRK whis- 
key. It's A. P. Hotaling & Co.'s best on the market. 




agood 

for a 

dollar.ui a half 



Centemeri 

109 GrantAve.BetGeary&PostSts. 



"The O'Hara % Livermore Studio 
of Applied Arts, 356 Sutter Street 
will make up in original designs, 
embroideries and brocades furn- 
ished by their customers" rj^ 




MISS LOUISE MANNINO, Maoaier 

MRS. CLARICE COHEN. President 



House and Church Wed 
dings. 

Receptions, Luncheons, 
Dinners, and Funerals. 

Supply and care of flowers 
for offices. 

Choicest cut flowers. 



246 Stockton St. 

Corner Post 
TELEPHONE MAIN 847 



"BABJ" 



EPICDRIAN RESTAURANT 

323 LAKKIff STREET 



15he James H. Babcock Catering Co. 

409 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



REMOVAL NOTICE 



PATRICK & CO,, have moved to their new 
quarters 111-118 8AN80ME STREET, where a 
complete line of Rubber Stamps. Stencil*, Seels. 
Metal Checks. Box Brands, etc., can be found. 



NEWTON J. THARP 



ARCHITECT 



131 Post Street. 



an Francisco. 



January 21, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




«-.WANb- 4 



presented on Monday night a comedy 

ir acts, b) Clyde Fitch, entitled "The < iirl and 
the Judge." I regret to find that Mis- Lillian I aw 
rence was unable, through illness, to take the pan 
of Winifred Stanton, the leading part, of course. I 

however, a young girl, Miss Woodson, take this 
part. and of necessity read it throughout. So < K-li- 
cately, nevertheless, and so sweetly did she do it that 
gained the immediate applause of the h 

inly that: I saw Mr. Craig throw himself into 

the sha<low of his own part to make brighter and 

more "facile"' the undertaking of this young girl, 

who was essaying at a moment's notice a difficult role. 

I don't think I ever listened to such a pretty read- 

f a part by a young girl, nor have I ever seen 



out the question of mentality entirely, I will 

with you that it is a bally good show. There 1- a 
sextette of wonderfully good dancers, ami the inter- 
polation from "In Zanzibar" easily hear- an . 
or two. The singing is indifferent throughout. 
* * * 

They told me that when "The Great Orpheum 

Something or Other" came to town. 1 was to "look 

out." and I did. Something or other ha- struck the 

t Irpheum this week that I might have missed, had 
I not been looking out. In other words, they have 
got a show "par excellence" — not from start to finish 
— I will not say that, but there are so many good num- 
bers that you forget the bad ones in accepting the 
good ones. 




Scene from "The Holy City," to be played at the Central Theatre next week. 



such a sweet "accord" as the company gave her. It 
was a very hard thing to attempt. It was very beau- 
tifully carried out. 

"Du reste," I cannot say that I am greatly filled 
with desire for "The Girl and the Judge." It seems 
to me to be lacking sadly in continuity of plot. The 
comedy of the whole affair is carried and sustained 
by Mrs. Brown, most ably presented by Miss Laura 

Adams, whose acting is naturalness personified. 
* * * 

"The Silver Slipper," at the Grand, makes up in 
numbers what it lacks in efficiency. Edwards is a 
fair Dutch comedian, but, certes ! the rest are only a 
little above the "also ran" class. There is a profu- 
sion of people on the stage, and at times the picture 
is a most effective one. If you will consent to cutting 



Will M. Cressy introduced a new creation on Sun- 
day afternoon, "The New Depot," that made me 
realize more fully than he did in his first effort the 
possibility of pathos when carried out to its full in- 
tensity by a capable artist. Still, I have a hankering 
for the skit that went before. However, that may be, 
I shall carry with me for many moons to come the 
dry wit and clever sayings of a man who has so well 
thought out his world. 

The four musical Avolos are worthy of mention, 
their musical entertainment being of a very high or- 
der. Clifford and Burke, however, got the house on 
Sunday afternoon. They are a team of clever colored 
comedians, and their turn is excellent. 

The ten Nelsons, I think, are the cleverest acro- 
bats that I have seen in many a day. All told, the Or- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



pheum is presenting a very all-round high-class show 
this week, well worth seeing. 
* * # 

Tetrazzini gave us "Lucia" on Tuesday night, re- 
covering from a very bad cold that made us fairly 
tremble. I dug away back into the past, and remem- 
bered a voice, Adelina Parti's, that had given me the 
same cold shudders. 

A voice can do that, you know, quicker than a 
speaking tone. Tetrazzini has not only the great 
quality of telling you through her throat the knowl- 
edge of music, but she has personality, a personality 
that compels and governs you. 




Lulsa Tetrazzini. 

< in Tuesday night I was prepared, at least I 
thought I was, for surprises, in that I had heard this 
( iod-given voice on the opening night, but I found 
myself not half-way prepared for the revelations of 
Tuesday. 

Tetrazzini's voice apparently has no limit. Her 
throat is music, music so sweet that it makes your 
own throat throb, music that asks you to get on your 
feet and shout to her your appreciation. 

Being a Scotchman myself, the get-up of the sup- 
posedly Scotch people on the stage was a horrible 
revelation to me, but I passed all that : I saw and 
listened to just one soul — Tetrazzini. 

She has, as I have already said, a God-given voice. 
The sound comes from her throat without any effort. 
What she commands or what she has in reserve, I do 
not know. I find her voice of such extreme purity 
that it would be unfair to consider voices of the past. 

The house was packed with a "spontaneity of 
know-what's-good" people. When Lucia concluded 
her farewell duet with Edgar, the house was on tip- 
toes, and after the mad scene, the people gave to this 
beautiful voice the tribute due it. 

To me, Tetrazzini is such a power in the musical 
firmament that she will presently electrify this little 
world of ours. I am so glad that we on the Coast 
have had an opportunity of knowing and appreciating 



January 21, 1905. 

this little lady before she goes to her further suc- 
cesses. 

The curtain-raiser at the Columbia this week, "Cap- 
tain January," is a very delightful little affair, which 
is more than can be said of "A Country Mouse," 
which, to me, is sadly lacking in likeableness. I found 
it unclean, without being funny ; "therefore, it was 
stupid, and a listless house evidently agreed with 
me. 

France and her authors and writers have got the 
knowledge of writing plays of this kind down to an 
exceedingly fine point, and have the advantage of a 
language that is at all times full of expression. ( )ur 
language is harsh and rather unprofitable, and in 
plays of this kind the results are often disastrous. 

However, while I may dislike the play of "A Coun- 
try Mouse," I was very much impressed with the 
clever work of Edna Wallace-Hopper as Angela Muir. 
She has a manner that is exceedingly pleasing, and 
gives to this very demure Miss Muir a meaning that 
compels your interest. Miss Wallace-Hopper has 
youth, beauty and talent, and I enjoyed her. I wish 
I could say the same about the play. Herbert 
Budd's Jephcot is a very tidy presentation, very 
cleverly studied out. 

* * * 

On Monday, January 23d, the Alcazar Stock Com- 
pany will produce Paul M. Potter's dramatization 
from the German of the far-famed play, "The Con- 
querors." This drama, like "Old Heidelberg," should 
be a pronounced success at the Alcazar, by reason of 
its many excellent dramatic situations, quaint comedy 
and atmosphere that is peculiarly its own. On Mon- 
day, January 30th, "The Middleman," one of E. R. 
Willard's greatest successes, will be produced, with 
John Craig in the famous role of Cyrus Blenkarn. It 
is a noteworthy fact that this production will be 
given the week following Mr. Willard's return to this 
country. The special Ibsen matinee of "Ghosts" has 
been postponed to Wednesday, January 25th. 

* * * 

"The Holy City" will be produced at the Central 
Theatre next week. This play is a near approach to 
the original "Passion Play" in time, action and lan- 
guage. The illustration in this issue gives an idea 
of what it is like. 

* * * 

The elaborate production of "The Silver Slipper" 
will be given for a second week at the Grand Opera 
House, commencing Sunday matinee. On January 











DISCOUNT SALE 




Now on in every department 

Reduction of 10 to 25 per cent, on 

CHINA, ART GOODS, CUT GLASS, 

KITCHEN WARE, ETC. 


NATHAN-DOHRMANN CO. 

122-132 SUTTER STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 









January II, 1905. 



. Man of the 

ind Reuben Fax, the celebi 
char, r, will begin a week's engagement in 

Ian i^lni'iil Scottish play, "The Bon- 

nie Brier Bush." 

• • • 

The Carter De Haven .sextette, one of the bis vau- 
deville sti - "ii, will begin a limited 
gement at the Orpheum Sunday afternoon, V 
tide Capitaine, "the perfect woman,' whosi picture 
is printed herewith, and a number of other high-class 
attractions, will give a performance equal to anything 
ever seen at this theatre. 

« * * 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Tivoli Opera house. tl,irn,r F -' l i:; 



13 




Alcide Capitaine, "The Perfect Woman," who will 
give an aerial exhibition at the Orpheum on Sunday 
afternoon. 

* * * 

The Star Trio, Jennings O'Brien, Horace Mann 
and Cad Franks, will make their first appearance at 
the Chutes this coming week, presenting their hilari- 
ous skit, entitled "Our Uncle." The four Olifans, 
European grotesques, who made a great hit at the 
Orpheum on their last visit to this city, will give 
their unique act ; and Auer, another European, will 
show how to make highly artistic pictures from rags. 
Altogether the Chutes Theatre is providing an excel- 
lent show. 

* * * 

William Collier will appear at the Columbia Thea- 
tre for two weeks, commencing Monday, January 
30th, in Richard Harding Davis' new farce, "The Dic- 
tator." 

(Continued to Page 25.) 

You can't help enjoying a visit to the Techau Tavern, where 

the beat people in town gather nightly after the theatre. Best 
food, wine* and music. 



GRAND OPERfl 

In li.-illnn 

Thlril an.! tieu t.. th.' hist week of Hi 

Begin* Monday arming, January 33. 

red si-ata now on aale. Prices, u. »i .--., u. j.,.. 



Grarjd Opera House 

I. net week begins tomorrow Sunday Matinee. 
John C. Fisher's stupendous musical production, 

THE SILVER SLIPPER 

Matinee 8alurd»y. Popular price*: -ac sue. 76c, tl. 
Beginning Sunday Matinee. January 2D 
I. H. Stoddartand Reuben Fox in 

THE BONNIE BRIER BUSH 



Omhplim , O'Farrell St.. 

v^i kJi ICUIIJ. bet Stockton and Powell Ste. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee. Jan. 22. 

5 BIG NEW ACTS 

a Bh^« r .Th?KSo. 8 ^ tte:A JS!n e ^ ,a,)ltai,le:BlBna ' Blnns <">d 
isinus; Ine Ureal 1 hereses;ftil M. Lressy and Blum he U:ivne 

Hnd te R,V,1 g e -Bill Biflln's Baby: iour Musit-al AvoIcb: tiSJSd 
and Burke; Orpheum Motion Pictures und last week of 

THE 10 NELSONS 

Matinees every Wednesday. Thursday. Saturday and Sunday 
Prices 10. 26 and sue. 



Columbia Theatre B0TT,>os ' »*» * ^ 

^ • Le»see8 and Mai 

This and next week. Nightly, including Sunday. 
Matinee Saturday only. Frank McKee presents 

EDNfl WALLACE HOPPER 

and a capable company in the comedy success 

fl COUNTRY MOUSE 

By Arthur Law, preceded by the curtain raise, 
CAPTAIN JANUARY, by Augustus Barrett. 
Jan. 30.— William Collier in "THE DICTATOR." 



Alcazar Theatre E . SaSrtffiS.r 

One week commencing Monday January 23 

Regular matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

The Alcazar Stock Company in a delightful dramatization from 

the (ierman of Paul M. Potter's famous play 

THE CONQUERORS 

Special Ibsen matinee, Wednesday, Jan. 25, of 

GHOSTS 

V ith Harry Mestayer and Lillian LawreDce. 

Monday Jan. 30.— Great production of. "The Middleman" 

Evenings 26c. to 76c. MatiLees 26c. to 60c. 



Czntral Thfidtrf* , Belasco & Mayer, proprietors 

■ ,lIUI lllCULfe. Market St., near 8th. Phone Sou 111 633 
Beginning Monday Jan. 23. Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
The greatest biblical play ever written. 

JERUSALEM, THE HOLY CITY 

Special engagement of JULIET CROSBY. 
Special cast, scenery and a special production. 
Prices the same as always. 
Prices evening loc to 60o. Matinees loc, 15c, 25o. 

rafter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the 
theatre is over. 



MR. 


ALBERT 

ARCHITEC 


FARR 


REMOVED 




120 SVTTER ST. 



If you want your old suit to look like new, send it to 

Spauldir.s h Cleaning- and Dyeing "Works, 127 Stockton street. 
Careful ureasers always do this. Spaulding's also clean gloves, 
cravats, curtains, laces and all such goods. 



PL A YS .7„ p LAYQ 

1 ^"ENTERTAINMENTS ■ ^^^ 

Catalog of thousands sent Free ! Free! Free! 
Addrm SAM'L FRENCH, 32 W. 22d St., New York 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 21, 1905. 




Uhe introduction in the- Legislature of a bill p ovid- ■ 
ing for an increase in the salaries of the Superior 
Judges, has directed some attention to our local judi- 
ciary. There are those who oppose the proposed in- 
crease in the pay of the law interpreters, but I think 
their opposition is aroused more by reason of person- 
alities than from any inherent objection in the bill. 
It may be admitted that there are some light-weights 
upon the local bench, but it must be also admitted 
that any lawyer who is not a light-weight can earn 
more money in a year than the amount of the annual 
salary of a Superior Judge. The laborer is worthy of 
his hire. If the salary of the Judges is fixed at a 
comparatively low figure, comparatively low-grade 
men will be found upon the bench. The Superior 
Judges of this county are paid $4,000 a year. That 
amount is also paid to most of the elective officers. 
The Recorder, for instance, who is merely a clerk, 
and whose responsibility consists in seeing that 
documents left in his office are accurately copied, and 
the record books safely kept, is paid as much as a 
Judge who passes upon questions involving great 
capital and the interests of many people, and upon 
whose knowledge of the law frequently rests the life 
or liberty of citizens. If the Recorder's position is 
worth $4,000 a year, a Superior Judge should be paid, 
at the same rate of valuation, at least $8,000 a year. 
Our City Engineer gets $5,000 a year, $1,000 more 
than the Judges. The bill increasing the salaries of 
the Judges should become a law. The people com- 
plain frequently of the delays of our courts, and put 
the blame upon the Judges, but the people themselves 
are to blame. Let them invite higher grade men to 
the bench by paying bigger salaries, and much greater 
satisfaction with the administration of the courts 

will result. 

* * * 

Some of our Judges, by the way, attended that now 
famous Kowalsky banquet. Judge Kerrigan, among 
others, told a few stories. The least said about thos 
stories the better. Judge Kerrigan is a popular young 
man, and has made a good Judge, but he should re- 
member that, as a Judge, even in moments of relaxa- 
tion, more is expected from him than from a private 
citizen. At another feast given recently. Judge Hunt 
relieved himself of a few remarks. Now, once upon a 
time, John Hunt had a well established reputation as 
something of a wit. He has read humorous papers 
at various club aflfairs, and his efforts have been al- 
ways well received. But I fear that with the years, 
his" wit has waxed fat. Certainly, his most recem 
effort was unworthy of hi.m He joked about the 
people of San Francisco paying only half the salaries 
of the Judges, as if to give the idea that they thought 
that was sufficient burden for such a bench. \\ ell, 
many taxpayers do think so, and many more will soon 
get the same impression, if a man like juA^r Hunt 
makes the judiciary the object of ridicule. You know, 
the world frequently takes a man at his own valua- 
tion. Hunt also said he paid certain bills whenever r e 
collector caught him. Of course, he meant to be 
funny, but it was very cheap wit, and I have no doubt 
he has reached the same conclusion after reflection. 
Hunt might take warning from the fate of many pub- 
lic men who have tried to establish reputations as 
humorists. 

* * * 

The marriage of Mrs. Ida McKinley Morse, widow 



of George T. Morse, late clerk of the Cnited States 
District Court, who died a few months ago, to Harry 
Cooper, did not cause much surprise among their 
friends. George Morse and Harry Cooper were in- 
timate friends. Cooper has inherited the peculiarity 
of his father, in that he usually remains in his store 
until nearly midnight. Whenever the Morses were 
down town in the evening, they usually dropped into 
Cooper's on the way home. He was a frequent and 
welcome visitor at the home of the Morses, and it is 
said that when Mr. Morse was on his death-bed, his 
last request of his friend was that he should be the 
counselor of his wife, after his death. Mrs. Morse 
went to Canton, O., shortly after her husband's death, 
and there visited the widow of the late President Mc- 
Kinley, who was her uncle. Cooper also went East. 
From New York be telegraphed Mrs. Morse briefly 
and to the point: "Will you marry me?" Her answer 
was equally terse "1 will. When and where?" A sec- 
ond telegram from Cooper invited her to meet him in 
New York. She went at once, and they were mar- 
ried in the famous Little Church Around the Corner, 
which has been the scene of many other romantic 
matches. 

* * * 

I hardly know whether it be worse for a lawyer to 
be known as a humorist than as a poet. Now, there 
is Dr. Taylor, lawyer, doctor of medicine, and poet. 
When he is not telling the students at the Hastings' 
College of the Law something about Blackstone and 
other eminent men long since dead, he is writing a 
treatise upon some medical subject, or raising his soul 
in song — said song being subsequently published for 
private distribution. Dr. Taylor has high standing 
at the bar, but. nevertheless, many lawyers say there 
would be fewer holes in our charter if Dr. Taylor, 
upon whom is largely placed the responsibility of that 
remarkable document, had left his Pegasus in the 
stable, when he was a member of the Board of Free- 
holders, and had devoted the legal part of his brain 
more directly to harmonizing the various articles of 
the charter. " But then, I rather think these caviling 
critics are envious of Dr. Taylor. It is not every 
member of the bar who is qualified to doctor a sick 
man, draw his will, administer upon his estate, and 
versify his virtues upon a tombstone. It is said that 




PIERCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO., Inc. 

STORAGE. MOVING. PACKING «md SHIPPING 

V. AREHOUSE, EDDY ST., near Fillmore 

Separate built rooms for the Storage of Household Furniture 

Office: Post and Powell Sts. Phone Private 571. 



January ti, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«5 



Ralph 1 . Harrison, of the Supreme 
ir the laurels that 
ihc hrow of the tru ,r Harrison 1* 

gnihed nun, and only occasionally indu 
Such an occasion was the 1 
rendition by him of the opinion in tl 
ward I. Shcchan ag >eph II. Scott. Thi 

r the office of Tax < loltecti 
which Scott had been elected. Sheehan, who was 
incumbent, and who was defeated at the election, 
tended that Scott was n« »t qualified, because he had 
i in San Francisco live years, as the char- 
ter requires. Scott set up that he had intended mov- 
ing from San Jose to San Francisco more than five 
years prior to his election, but, as a matter of fact, 
he did not so remove until about four years prior 
to the election. lie was. therefore, not qualified to 
hold the office of 'lax collector, but he held it. just 
the same, and served the full term of two years, and 
drew SS.ooo salary. In commenting upon Scott's 
intention to take tip his residence in San Francisco, 
Commissioner Harrison quotes from Macbeth: 

"The flighty purpose never is o'ertook 
Unless the deed go with it." 

Now, if that quotation were parodied as follows: 

"The flighty office never is o'ertook 
I'nless the stuff goes with it," 

we would have a better understanding of why Shee- 
han never overtook Scott in the chase for the job 
of Tax Collector : Scott drew down the stuff. 

* * * 

Dr. Grant Selfridge has lost his suit against Blitz 
Paxton to recover the fee for his services in perform- 
ing an operation upon Paxton's daughter, Roma. 
The affairs of the Paxtons have been before the pub- 
lic for years. Mrs. Bessie Paxton, at the time of her 
divorce, received from her husband $5,620 in money, 
a guaranteed agreement to receive $13,200 in monthly 
payments of $100, and Paxton also entered into some 
arrangement about keeping up an insurance policy. 
She was awarded the custody of the little girl. The 
Supreme Court holds that the parent to whom the 
custody of the child is given in a divorce suit is 
alone responsible for bills contracted for the child. 
Blitz Paxton, therefore, will not have to pay the 
doctor who operated upon his little girl. This is one 
of the very few cases in which the Supreme Court 
has overruled Judge Seawell. He gave judgment 
against the father, because of the injustice which 
might follow if the father could escape the liability 
to support his children on account of a decree of 
divorce founded on his misconduct. Unfortunately, 
that judgment was based upon a generous sentiment, 
and not upon the law. 

* * * 

The trustees of the Sutro estate, in reporting their 
expenditures to the Probate Court, include an item 
for Portland cement used for fixing up an attack of 
softening of the head from which the sphinx in the 
Sutro gardens was suffering. The sphinx recovered. 
This treatment is commended to the bunch of local 
statesmen who are now drawing down eight per at 
Sacramento. 

* * * 

On New Year's Day, the steamer Lakme struck on 
the Humboldt Bar, and was soon in a sinking condi- 
tion. The Captain called all hands to jettison the 
cargo. The crew looked in their union book of rules, 
and, after consultation, demanded time and a half 



the -hip Th. 
tain was forced t" yield to tl irtion. 

A tug made fas) to the steamer, and the 
transferred to the tug. The tug's haw 
the crew refused to return to the lakme to 

\ •'!! -ee. their union had no) provided 
a rule for such an emergency. Now, if the Captain 
of the Lakme had placed a few buckshot ill the hides 
■ if those miserable skulkers, their all-powerful union 

might have found there is such a thing as summary 

punishment fur mutiny on tin- high seas. 
» * * 

Mrs. Hesthal successful!) conducted a first-class 

hotel for many years. For a year or two past. Mrs. 
Hesthal "played the ponies." Sequel? Mrs. Hesthal 

is now a bankrupt. 

* * * 

In the interest of honest sport. William Greer Har- 
rison, president of the ( (lynipic Club, went before the 
Police Committee of the Board of Supervisors, and ex- 
plained to them that the so-called amateur fights for 
which they have been issuing permits are prize- 
fights, impure and simple. The committee knew it 
ail the time, but the statement of Mr. Harrison 
makes the fact a matter of public record, and the 
Supervisors can no longer escape proper criticism on 
the ground that the fight promoters have deceived 
them. But no sooner had Mr. Harrison retired than 
the Police Committee voted in favor of granting a 
license to the Hawthorne Club, one of the ordinary 
fake amateur concerns. Such Supervisors are no 
more worthy of public confidence than the fakers 
whom they aid. Supervisor Eggers, that great re- 
former, is one of the leading spirits of the Police 
Committee. 



For the Repair 

of physical 

Wear and Tear 




^NTty 



Baltimore Rye 

^ BOTTLED BY 

nM.LANAHAN&SON. 
BALTIMORE. 



men seek a puie 
tonical stimulant 



Hunter 

Baltimore 

Rye 



on account of its age. 
purity, flavor, si'isfies 
all needs. 

Physicians recommend 
and prescribe it: 



HILBERT MERCANTILE CO., 

136-144 Second Street, San Francisco. Cal. 
Telephone Exchange 313 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 21, 1905. 




Society worked hard at the Cafe Chantant to get 
into the spirit of the boulevardier, and as the treasury 
of the Telegraph Hill Association is bulging with 
funds as a result, what difference if your true French- 
man would not have recognized this Cafe Chantant! 
True, the outward semblance was all there, for there 
are people a-plenty who know the real thing as Paris 
labels it. But the inward spirit did not ring sponta- 
neous — the effort was obvious. Only the Gallic spirit 
can forage in the garden of pleasure with ingenious 
joy. "Abandon" spells license with us, while with the 
Latin races, in its pure form, it is merely ingenious- 
ness. 

The crowd was smartly gowned, and there were 
several conspicuously handsome women at the tables. 
Mrs. Sigmund Stern was the most beautiful woman 
in the room, and seemed absolutely unconscious of 
the admiring glances and comments her loveliness 
called forth. Mrs. Will Crocker was very hand- 
somely frocked, and looked unusually well. In fact, 
as an example of sartorial elegance, the Cafe Chantant 
is without a peer this season. 

Miss Betty Ashe and her co-workers in the Tele- 
graph Hill settlement, are jubilant over the sadly- 
needed funds they netted, which will help them scat- 
ter a few of the clouds that hover over that district. 
I heard a story the other day which proves that 



society girls do not always go into that sort of work 
with "kid gloves on." A young woman, who had 
been taking an interest in a poor family, found that 
they were without the barest necessities, and she went 
down to a wholesale house and asked them to donate 
a sack of flour. The firm promised to do it, but re- 
fused to deliver the flour. The girl left an order with 
an expressman, but when he failed to show up at the 
promised time, she took a small boy and his coaster, 
and went to the rescue. Together they' hauled the 
flour and other groceries on the coaster, and a mighty 
heavy load it was to pull up that steep hill, but tne 
girl did it with as much vim as she would swing a 
golf club. 

* * * 

The Friday cotillions are getting ready to spring 
into being by next week, and in tone and character 
they will be the legitimate successors of the Fort- 
nightlies which the late Mrs. Salisbury patronessed. 
Mrs. William B. Collier, who was one of Mrs. Salis- 
bury's oldest and best friends, is on the list of pa- 
tronesses for the new Friday cotillions, and Mrs. 
Langhorne and Mrs. Shorb will also legislate the af- 
fairs of the club. Mrs. Eleanor Martin's is the only 
other name on the list, but 1 understand that she has 
gone into the affair with the understanding that none 
of the arduous duties be shoved her way. The per- 



ARMAND CAILLEAU Inc. 



Genuine Annual Sale 



This Season's Entire Stock of 

Cloaks, Suits, Skirts, Tea Gowns, Waists, Etc. 
Monday, January 23d 

1 1 2 to 1 1 6 KEARNY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



January 21, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



tillions will be iw ii 
that of the defunct lies, tho cunservati 

,■ largely rcprt 1 the darn 

an armv and Davy affair. 

• • • 

rible who is plannin) 
and spend some time in traveling 
lit- will join die Robinson Rilcys, who an 
leisurely over the Continent, and the Ashton Po 
and Kutli McNutt will probably complete this mcrrj 
party of Californians. Ashton Potter is now in fairly 

health, though the doctors have warned liitii 
against overdi 

Thursday afternoon brought out a gay crowd to 
see "The Gars," which production lias kept every one 
on the tip-toe of expectation, and anticipations did 
not come down with a sickening thud, for the society 
cast handled the play in a fashion that kept the au- 
dience on good terms with itself. Comparisons are 
in poor taste, so people tight-locked the memorj of 
the Anglin-Miller productii n, and did not compare 
the amateur production with the professional hand- 
ling of the play. No matinee here ever brought out 
such a brilliant audience as crowded the Columbia on 
Thursday — pretty gowns galore gave a gala appear- 
ance to the bouse that made it seem quite unlike the 

matinees of — well, never mind the rest of that 
sentence. 

* * * 

It was only at the last moment that James L. Flood 
planted his foot squarely, and refused to take along 
the clamoring wives and sisters who wanted to ac- 
company the party he is taking into Mexico on a 
hunting trip. A number of the ladies insisted that 
they could pepper a duck as deftly as their lords, and 
Mr. Flood was almost won over to their argument. 
But finally the men decided that a real hunting trip 
is exclusively masculine gender, and they set off alone 
in the sumptuous private car Mr. Flood provided for 
his guests. John D. Spreckels recently went on a 
hunting trip into Southern California, and his daugh- 
ter Grace, who was one of the party, proved a crack 
shot. 

The announcement of Lily Spreckels' engagement 
to Harry Holbrook was a complete surprise. Before 
Mrs. Spreckels and her daughter left for Europe, the 
tabbies smelled a mouse, but they were put off the 
scent by that trip a'broad. As a rule, Cupid objects 
to such long-distance arrangements, but in this case 
it was thought best for Miss Lily to accompany her 
mother before joining the ranks of the married. Both 
Miss Spreckels and her fiance are devoted to motor- 
ing, and it was in a handsome new "bubble" that they 
called on their intimate friends and let the secret out 
of the bag. The wedding will be a spring event, I 
hear, and will doubtless be a large affair, as the 
friends of this fortunate young couple are legion. 

By way of prophecy, there is another girl who has 
left for Europe who strenuously denies that any en- 
gagement exists between her and the talented chap 
who has paid her marked attention all season, but I'll 
not be a bit surprised if she makes the interesting 
acknowledgment, too, when her wander-year is over. 

Friday was the most strenuous day of the week, 
with five teas and a smart bridge party punctuating 
the day, and the Gaiety Club dance enlivening the 
night. Mrs. Stanford's dinner party was an elaborate 
and enjoyable affair. Thursday was another busy day 
red-lettered by Mrs. Irwin's dinner to the Gus Spreck- 
els, and several teas. 



A Shin of Beauty Is a Joy Forever. 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUDS ORIENTAL CREAM 
OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



• amy, and 

tmrmlrj««i wr 
taste It ti> be sure It la pi 
nude, a. . epl no counterfeit "f 
similar name Mr 1. A Bayri 
s:iid to 11 lady "f the haul ton 
ci patient »: "Ai you ladli 
UN thi'm. I r<T(tmmen<l t ; > mr- 
aud's Cream' ns the least harm- 
ful of nil tin- akin preparations." 
For sale by all druggists and 
fancy-goods dealers In the 
United States. Canadas and Eu- 
rope. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Prop. 
XI Great Jones St., New York. 




ing at his beautiful new residence on San Jose avenue, 
in Alameda, to a party of gentlemen friends, mem- 
bers of the directorate of the Unitarian Club, on last 
Friday evening. The magnificent home was thrown 
open to the guests, eleven in number. An elaborate 
menu was served, and after the refreshments, the 
gentlefnen repaired to the spacious reception room, 
and enjoyed conversation and cigars until after the 
midnight hour. Those present were Messrs. William 
Sherwood, Dr. Scott, President Otis, Past Presidents 
Kohlmeier and Holt, Brainard C. Brown, Dr. Smith, 
Herbert C. Clark, Moore and Beringer. 

Arrivals at Hotel Rafael during week ending Jan. 
17, 1905 : Mr .and Mrs. A. I. Esberg, Mr. and Mrs. E. 
A. Leigh, Mrs. O. P. Earns, Mrs. T. T. Williams, Miss 
Williams, Mr. T. McMullin, Mr. H. A. Cook, Dr. and 
Mrs. E. R. Sill, Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Brown, Mrs. F. R. 
Day, Mr. and Mrs. G. Heazelton, Mr. and Mrs. A. S. 
Lilly, Mr. and Mrs. F. S. Johnson, Baroness Von 
Schroder, Mr. Page. 

Mrs. R. D. Girvin entertained at dinner at Hotel 
Rafael on Friday. 

Arrivals at Hotel del Monte for the week ending 
January 15, 1905: Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Wilcox, Mr. 
James Langfett, Mrs. W. C. Langfett, Portland ; Mr. 
and Mrs. H. A. Noble, Miss Sara E. Compton, Seat- 
tle ; Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Coleman, Vancouver ; Mr. 
and Mrs. Ed. A. Me'rydith, Pittsburg; Mrs. F. Gar- 
rison, Sausalito; A. H. Breed, H. P. Bancroft, Oak- 
land; Mr. and Mrs.. James Woods, William McMur- 
ray, Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Stoll, A. D. Shepard, E. J. 
Coleman, Ashton Potter, San Francisco. 



Wedding Invitations. 

We give special attention to prevailing forms and 
engrave visiting cards, wedding invitations and an- 
nouncements, correctly and reasonably. Monogram, 
crests and address dies made to order. C. E. 
Goldsmith, the engraver, is now with us, which in- 
sures a continuance of the very best work that the en- 
graver's art can produce. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 
Market street. 



The Star Hair Remedy — best of all tonics and restoratives. 

Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not a dye. 
At druggists and hair dressers. Accept no substitute. Star 
Remedy Co., 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 



-Decorations for weddings, Charlotte F. Williams, 281 Post St. 



Mr. A. R. Baum, of Alameda, gave a hourse-warm- 



TOUPEES 

Toupees and wigs for men— light, cool and fitting perfectly. Im- 
possible to detect them fromth* natural hair. You do not realize 
the satisfaction of a toupee until you wear one of mine. Mani- 
curing and face massage for men. 

G. Lederer. 123 Stockton St. 

Everything in Hair Goods for Ladies and Gentlemen. 



r8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



fhe REFLECTIONS 

0FA Knocker 




^"Ry John KendrickJ^angs. 

^^ Co^y,'<0hi; by IvW.+Jolmea, iojo-g.-. 

He Discusses Governor Pennypacker's Recommen- 
dations. 

"Hurrah for Governor Pennypacker!" cried the 
Knocker. "There's a man as is a man. He's got the 
courage of his convictions." 

"Has he?" put in the Growler. "What's he been 
convicted of?" 

"Oh, you know what I mean well enough," said 
the Knocker. "You cheap wits can have all the fun 
you want with him, but it doesn't alter the fact that 
he's a brave man who isn't afraid to say what he 
thinks. He's shown that by tackling the newspapers. 
There's no worse tyranny in the world than that of 
the newspaper, and it does my heart good to find 
somebody who comes out boldly and bravely and 
gives 'em a good jab. Things have reached such a 
pass these days that there's no longer any such thing 
as a private life. If a statesman sneezes, extras are 
got out about it from one end of the country to the 
other; he is criticised for intruding so trivial a thing 
as a sneeze upon the solemn deliberations of the Up- 
per Chamber of Congress, and when be takes his 
handkerchief out of his pocket to blow his nose after 
the incident, everybody wants to know where he got 
it. Opposition newspapers refer to it as a Trust-made 
article, and insinuate that it was given to him by the 
man behind the Trust to influence his vote as hostile 
legislation. Pictures of his wife and children appear 
in Sunday Specials under the title of 'The Home Life 
of the Sneezing Senator.' If he happens to have been 
jilted by some girl in his early youth, her picture is 
lugged in, too, with a full account of how she came to 
jilt him. the insinuation being that she was the first 
to discover that from his infancy he was a hard 
drinker, and that while under the influence of rum 
he had a pleasant habit of torturing kittens and put- 
ting his grandmother's eyes out." 

"He has his redress if he is libelled," suggested the 
Growler. 

"Yes, he can sit down and write a letter denying 
that he ever put his grandmother's eyes out," said the 
Knocker, "or he can sue the editor for damages. In 
the first instance, the editor will take his letter of de- 
nial and print as much of it as he is inclined to, 
apologizing for his reference to the grandmother and 
the kittens, but intimating that the Senator will prob- 
ably not deny having put prussic acid in his grand- 
father's soup, or having once tied a tin can to a dog's 
tail. The apology reiterates the charge of sneezing 
in the Senate ITalls, and ends by wanting to know 
wdiether the honorable gentleman has been sent to 
Washington to sneeze or to guard the people's inter- 
ests from the marauding hand of the Wall street 
sharks, from whose despoiling touch nothing is safe 
these plutocratic times. The alternative, the suit for 
libel, is equally unsatisfactory and annoying. The 
plaintiff is compelled to testify and subject himself 
to an annoying cross-examination at the hands of the 
defendant's attorneys, who ask him if he was not in 
1902 a regular habitue of one of Dick Canfield's rou- 
lette halls in the city of New York; if he was not in 
( Hierlin, Ohio, the afternoon that Mrs. Chadwick 



January 21, 1905. 

sold the Carnegie bricks to the Oberlin Bank ; where 
he was on the nineteenth day of last June at nine 
o'clock in the morning, at the hour when Caesar 
Young was said to have been shot by Nan Patter- 
son." 

"What has all that cot to do with the case?" de- 
manded the Growler. 

"Nothing," said the Knocker, "but that makes no 
difference. He is asked those questions just the same, 
and the judge, intimidated by the newspapers, and 
probably on the look-out for his own election, over- 
rules any objection to them. It is definitely proved 
by the plaintiff's own admission that he did sneeze 
as charged by the offending newspaper. He has to 
admit that he hadn't the slightest idea where his 
handkerchief came from, because his wife buys all 
his handkerchiefs for him, whereupon he is criticised 
for dragging his wife's name into a personal quarrel, 
and accused of trying to shield himself behind a petti- 
coat, than which there is no more despicable act. His 
grandmother having been dead for twenty-eight 
years, he cannot produce her in court to prove that 
he never put her eyes out, and the fact that none of 
the kittens of his 'early youth have lived until this, 
establishes a strong presumption against his inno- 
cence on the kitten charge. 'You will observe, gen- 
tlemen of the jury.' says the defendant's lawyer, 'the 
significant fact that not one of the kittens this plain- 
tiff is charged with having maltreated is alive to-day 
— not one of them, in spite of the fact that the life of 
a cat is a proverbially indestructible one. To what 
conclusion, I ask you gentlemen, to what conclusion 
does this admitted state of affairs inevitably point? 
Not one kitten of the hosts with which his youth 
brought him into contact, is living today!' This is fol- 
lowed by an appeal to every juror in the box whose 
home is brightened by the companionship of a play- 
ful feline, that brings' tears to every eye and makes 
the Honorable Senator from Somewhere an object 
of universal execration. The result is a verdict for 
six cents, the costs to be bourne by the plaintiff, or 
practically a vindication for the newspaper." 

"Oh. well, a man who goes into public life hasn't 
got any right to a private life," said the Growler. 
"He is a public servant, and as such, should always 
be subject to the scrutiny of his employers. You 
ought to be thankful that the newspapers keep you 
advised as to his behavior." 

"Then there are the cartoonists," continued the 
Knocker. "Governor Pennypacker is after those fel- 
lows with a sharp stick, I tell you. Maybe a man 
has no right to a private life if he goes into the pub- 




The Oldest and Best 
Known Brand 



DISTILLED BT 

J. J. MEDER & ZOON 

SCHIEDAM 

HOLLAND 



Imported Into the U. 8. aince 1819 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
Agents Pacific Coast San Francisco. Cal. 



January 21. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'-9 



.•-.I ii 1 <h>n't think 

.i newspaper 1 
■r Tom Piatt, or Bryan, "r some 1 
marfe i monkey <>t him for the delectation of 
public? Why, they've even invaded the si 

and orinted caricatures of lead r> 
llarr\ Lehr ancl Vauxhall Keene. Even Mr. 
■11 allowed t>> go about 1 is private business 
without interference from the cartoonists, and only 
rday I saw a caricature of John I >. Rockefeller. 
He's a man whose whole life is devoted to coin col- 
lecting. ll< is a modest, quiel individual, who leads 
a sober life in pursuit of the ambition that prompts 
most men to work hard, and just because he is suc- 
ul, atxl his collection runs up into a billion coins, 
every little caricaturist in the country jibes him be- 
cause he is bald and lias some mysterious connection 
with the Baptist Church and the Standard < )il Com- 
pany. Carrie Nation is not a public servant. Neither 
i- I lowie. Judge Parker is a private citizen and Tom 
Watson is just a plain farmer, but that doesn't save 
them from the cartoonists." 

"Well, why should it"' They are all guilty of pub- 
lic acts." retorted the Growler, "or have been." 

"I tell you. Growler, the police have just as much 
right to put my face in the Rogue's Gallery as those 
cartoonists have to invade the private life of men 
like those 1 mention." 

"Yes, Knocker, I think they have. That's why I 
think your friend Pennypacker is wrong," continued 
the Growler, and for once the Knocker was not 
pleased with the Growler's agreement with his views. 



WHO? 

At (0 a blithesome little miss, 

Restrained by naught but Nature's law, 
'A ent romping o'er the glossy glade, 
\<i(\ laughed a merry 

Haw! 
Haw! 
Haw! 

A'i 20 she was bright and fair, 

Cut now restrained by fond mamma, — 
She only tossed her golden hair 
And laughed a rippling 
Ha! 
Ha! 
Ha! 

At 30 she was more sedate, 

But still from wedded bondage free ; 
She said her time was growing late, 
And laughed a yearning 
He! 
He! 
He! 

At 40 she despaired ot joy, 

For none had come her heart to woo. 
She sighed for either man or boy, 
And cried a doleful 

Who! 
Who! 
Who! 



Housekeepers 

know the advantage or Having always on hand a perfect cream 
for general household purposes. Borden's Peerless Brand 
Evaporated Cream is superior to raw cream, and being preserved 
and sterilized, keeps for an indefinite period. Use it for coffee, 
tea, cocoa and all household purposes. 

Cooper 



Ruinart 



& 



The champagne 
of perfection. Ta\ 
Essential to the 
enjoyment oi° 
any function 



. A-T HILBERT 

p> MERCANTILE© 





PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

VWGajkillSpecialArf? 

San Fran.cisco ° ' 



Phone Folsom 3103 Ilea, rhone Church 2616 

R. W. McDANIEL 

"Patent Chimney 

CHIMNEY TOPS. SMOKEY CHIMNEYS CURED 
1719 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASERS' GUIDE 



BERGEZ RESTAURANT— Rooms for ladles and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor 

POODLE DOG RESTAUEANT-N. E- Cor. Eddy and Mason streets. 
Private dining and banquet rooms, 'i elei hone Private Fxchange 428 
A- B. Blanco, Proprietor. 

NOTARr PUBLIC. 

MARTIN ARONSOHN. Notary Public and Pension Attor- 
ney. Office, 632 Market street, room 8, (opp. Palace Hotel) San 
Francisco. Tel. Black 6541. Loans on any security at lowest 
terms; no commissions. 



BOILER MAKERS, 



P. P. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314. 31«, Sl« Main 
street. Tron work of every description designed and constructed. 



BUSWELL COMPANY 



536 Tliiv Sh-Pflt 



Bookbinder, Paper-rulor, Printer and Blank 
Book Manufacturer 



Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. 

& Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Dos Mesas Wines Are Served at 



Zinkands 



Hotel 
Clarendon 



House 



Lux' >r 



River 
Steamers 



St.Fraucis 



Terrace 
Garden 




Techau 
Tavern 



Call Cafe 



Oyster 

Lonf 



lied I. ion 
Grill 



Foodie 



Dog 



Grown and Bottled by H. N. CROSS, M. D. 

319 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. Tel. Main 3189 



DOS MESAS VINEYARD AND WINERY 
CEDAR KNOLL VINEYARD AND WINERY 



LIVERMORE VALLEY 
NAPA COUNTY 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Figures and results of the California Fire Insurance 
business for 1 904, from the Pacific Underwriter. 



CALIFORNIA COMPANIES. 



San 



California Business. 



Company. Agent. 

Firemans Fund. ..._ Louis Weinmann. ... 

Home Fire and Marine Stephen D.Ives 

Pacific Underwriters McNear & Wayman. 



Francisco Amount 

Premiums. Written. Premiums. 

* 138.791 t 48,003.173 • 588.4E7 

27,254 12,007,533 219,205 

23,894 5,024,803 89,975 



Losses 

Paid. Ratio 

I 199.982 34,0 

110,2'.3 .'.t»-2 

41,492 40.1 



Totals 8 189,939 t 65,635,509 8 897,637 8 351.727 39.1 



Aachen £ Munich 

Alliance. 

Atlas. 

Austrian Phoenix 

British America 

Caledonian 

Commercial Union 

Hamburg-Bremen 

Law Union & Crown 

Liverpool & London & Globe. 

London 

London it Lancashire 

Manchester 

Netherlands 

New Zealand 

North BrilUh 

North German 

Norwich Union 

Northern 

Palatine 

Phoenix 

Prussian National 

Royal 

Roval Exchange 

Rhine & Moselle 

Scottish Union & National 

State 

Sun Insurance Office 

Svea .. 

Transatlantic 

Union 

Western 



Cesar Bertheau. .. . 

C. F. Mullins 

F.J. Devlin 

Dickson & Theime. 
W. L. W. Miller... 



T. J. Conroy 
C. F. M«l" 



llins . 



R. Herald, Jr 

Catton, Bell&Co 

C. D. Haven 

W. J. Landers 

Win. Macdonald 

F. J. Devlin 

Win. Macdonald 

Clinton Folger 

Tom C. Grant 

Walter Speyer 

W. H. Lowden 

W. J. Wilson 

C. F. Mullins 

W. Irving 

W.J. Loaiza 

Holla V. Watt 

Frank Dickson. ...... 

Syz&Co 

T. I. A. Tiedeman.... 

Wm. Macdonald 

C. A. Henry 41 Co.... 
Edward Brown& Sons. 

V. C. Driffield 

Catton, Bell & Co.... 
W. L. W. Miller 



FOREIGN COMPANIES. 
69,877 8 10,328,999 8 157.351 8 

48,324 7,577,193 110,766 

48,402 9,615,671 135,673 

88,212 6,117,372 72,012 

21,666 4.652.220 81.623 

48,672 8,656,744 130,417 

67,943 10,908,202 164,083 

72,297 9,278,258 134,146 

25,559 4,336,382 65,026 

65.626 20,066,449 266.825 

106.458 14,348,805 293,809 

84,344 18,710,104 260,483 

29,485 4,467,771 67,236 

t3,93S 457,030 7.546 

31,214 6,773,195 86,839 

43,762 9,601,913 138,516 

67,561 7,884,976 110,6% 

80,790 7,105,104 122,451 

66,660 11,134,354 166.064 

39,810 6,600.330 95,991 

44,256 8,31)0,934 135,951 

22,752 5,147,293 73,713 

83,033 17,871,605 281,893 

79,975 13,688,945 178,492 

64.283 8,065,882 109,433 

24,746 5,709,275 80,853 

16,038 8,262.283 48,017 

47,616 8,427,054 156,865 

25,843 6,513,066 1 19.370 

75.259 11,021,107 153,209 

44,350 7,818,936 117,803 

30,796 8,626,415 146,421 



66,000 11.9 

66,761 51.3 

86,646 27.11 

10,720 143 

42,893 51.9 

29,922 22.9 

113,987 69.5 

41,838 SI 1 

22,337 34.3 

87,119 32.0 

63,145 30.9 

69.046 26.5 

27,137 408 

12,474 ir/i.8 



3-1,921' 
40 910 



40.2 
29.5 



42,587 33.5 



r.o 
88.5 

68.8 
52.5 



45,810 
56.465 
56,520 
71,291 

23,935 32.4 

113,753 10.8 

54,991 3118 

19,6:"* 17 9 

81.400 30.1 

13.175 27.4 

79,040 50.8 

63,806 534 

70,375 16.0 

is is8 l'i :i 

63,565 43.4 



Totals 81,539,542 8279,858,325 84,187.502 81,609,511 38.4 



/Etna 

A inerican, Boston 

Agricultural 

American, N.J 

American Central 

American, Pa 

Assurance Co., of America .... 

Austin 

British American.. 

Caledonean American 

Citizens 

Connecticut 

Continental 

Commercial Union 

Colonial Underwriters 

Concordia 

Delaware 

Dutchess 

Equitable 

Fire Association 

Franklin 

German American 

German Alliance lus. Ass'n... 

Germania 

German, 111 

Glens Falls 

Globe-Rutgers 

German, Peoria 

Giraril F. S: M 

Hanover 

Hartford 

Home 

Indemnity Fire 

Ins. Co. of North America 

Kings County , .... 

Mercantile, Boston 

Michigan 

Milwaukee Mechanics 

National 

New York Fire 

Niagara 

New York Underwriters Ag'cy 

Northwestern National 

North German 

New Hampshire 

National Union 

Orient 

Philadelphia Underwriters. . . . 

Pelican 

Phenix of Brooklyn, 

Pennsylvania 

Phcenix, Hartford 

Providence Washington 

Qoeen 

Rochester German 

Sprin gfield 

St. Paul 

Spring Garden 

Scotch Underwriters 

traders 

Teutonia 

Union 

United Firemans 

Victoria 

Westchester 

Williamsburg City 

Western Underwriter 



COMPANIES 
Boardman & Spencer.. 8 50,427 3 

C. J. Stovel 12,003 

Edward Brown &Sons. 14,863 

Christenscn, Edw. &G 13,578 

Christensen.Edw.4tG 10,056 

Edward Brown StSons. 21,156 
C. A. Henry & Co.... 1,312 

C. G. Yates 2,095 

Paul Nippert 3.855 

T. J. Conroy 9,372 

Palache & Hewitt 17,610 

Ben;'. J. Smith 30,343 

A. G. Nason 21,687 

C. F. Mullins 3,430 

McNear.'S: Wayman.. 13,156 
Dickson & Thofine .... 6,992 

Edward Brown &Sons. 11,047 

C.J. Stovel 13,793 

Louis Weinmann 7,724 

Gutte & Frank 35,672 

Geo. F.Grant 24,314 

Geo. H.Tyson 51,430 

Geo. H.Tyson 5.183 

W. H. Breeding 47,758 

C. H. Ward 60,121 

E. E. Porter 17,018 

EdWard:Brown & Sons 6,893 

Gutte& Frank 4,939 

C. J. Stovel 11,166 

Cesar Bertheau 27.R59 

Palache & Hewitt 78,922 

H. I.. Roff 16,382 

W. H. Lowden 6,161 

las. D. Bailey 42,742 

F.J.Devlin 2,315 

Christcnsen, Edw. &G 7,516 

C. A. Henry 4iCo.... 6,899 

L. L. Bromwcll 31,544 

Geo. D. Dornin 84.085 

C. J. Stovel 6,296 

W. J. Landers 41,513 

Mann &. Wilson 68,000 

A. A. Allen 10,196 

WaltcrSoeyer 8,290 

Geo. H. Tyson 7,407 

A. G. Nason 17,376 

Wm. Macdonald 18,943 

Gutte & Frank 8,117 

W. Irving 4,901 

A. C. Olds 59,824 

Russel W. Osborn.... 69,647 

Geo. H. Tyson 27,458 

Ceo. E. Butler 13,299 

Rolla V. Watt 29,499 

T. C. Conroy 13,923 

Geo. D. Dornin 32,049 

Chrislensen, Edw. &G 14,837 

Dickson & Theime 9,569 

T. J. Conroy 125 

Gorden & Fraser 68,002 

Mann & Wilson 6,244 

Russel W. Osborn.... 8,496 

Gutie & Frank 11.879 

Canon, Bell & Co 1,869 

E. E. Potter 19,108 

E. E. Poller 17.376 

C. H. Ward 15,810 



OF OTHER STATES. 

12,168,309 8 182.179 8 63,721 

3,724.773 54,506 23,217 

2,502,044 43,320 10.742 

2,671,395 39,344 20.762 

3,822.903 59.346 24.598 

5,116,054 93,331 39,036 

284,439 5,564 1,907 

388,535 6,108 3 

497,889 7,138 1.192 

l,4O7'250 23,666 8,288 

8,559,590 55,889 19.482 

9,470,615 149,221 66.304 

15,826.899 204,272 48,869 

668,691 8,452 6,549 

3,039,630 51,197 20.501 

1,209,999 18.581 8.628 

1,957,804 31,432 15,862 

3,693,138 58,482 29,876 

2,073,499 3".,553 12,326 

0,l."ill,02C 94,683 32,021 

5,391 .703 88.636 43.462 

11,133,884 172,608 59,817 

3,270.571 49,668 7.115 

12,486,778 113,928 28,267 

12,587,207 181,233 56.525 

5,349.710 82.595 26,820 

1,225,725 23,285 16 5B0 

869,422 5,948 1,168 

8,195,800 48,203 13,978 

4,520,730 71,604 33.6 2 

20,304,501 297,967 100,536 

ls,ii'i7,'j:iS 302,174 152,080 

1,123,442 17,147 9,198 

11,172,402 168,661 49,779 

3-.6.001 3.829 681 

1,855 059 22,347 7,830 

1,407,247 28,371 11,101 

12,958.897 169.795 54,010 

6,814,896 120,406 67,!I90 

1.140,261 18,257 8,3''S 

0,681 ,223 102.600 36,205 

11,062,886 167.561 49,176 

8,848,795 107,121 45,204 

1,183,791 17,458 ' 111,122 

2,804,087 37.521 14,920 

3,648,420 66,358 17,389 

2,030.390 36,145 14.932 

2,021,585 34,909 15,559 

870,292 14.477 9,799 

8,913,846 131.308 43,1116 

10,620,965 166,962 66,473 

7,172,131 111,956 87,941 

2,819,818 47,852 27,855 

7,410,598 118,412 48,698 

2,370,031 87,247 10.215 

5,948,322 103,857 51,576 

8,530,031 52,679 24.318 

1,452,233 23,149 8,732 



11,608,269 164,681 42,604 

837,551 14,451 6,172 

1,189. 933 16.382 6,993 

2,168,061 81,655 7,630 

371,674 6,078 3,680 

4,947,797 74,340 24,845 

5,472,913 80,863 30,134 

4,396,747 62,718 20,143 



42 5 
38.6 
52 7 
41.4 
41 8 
35 5 

100 
84.11 

34.8 
37.7 
23.8 
76.6 
40 
40.1 
50.4 

51.0 
34.7 
34.1 
49.0 

84.» 
14.3 

24.8 
31.1 
32.4 
07.0 
19.6 
29.0 
46.9 
33.7 
50.3 
63.6 
29.5 
17.7 
85.0 
39.1 
31.8 
56.4 
457 
35.2 
29.3 
42.1 
59.7 
39.7 
30.8 
41.3 
44.5 
67.6 
32.8 
39.7 
33.8 
58.0 
41.1 
27.4 
49.6 
40.1 
87.7 

25.8 
42.7 
42.6 
24.1 
60.5 
83.4 
37.2 
35.3 



January 21, 1905. 

WOMEN EASY TO WAKE. 

"It is immeasurably harder to 
awaken men in the morning than 
it is women," a hotel proprietor in- 
forms me. "A tap or two at a 
woman's door in the morning is 
sufficient. No matter how late she 
may have retired, no matter how 
exhausted she may have been, no 
matter how faint the 'yes' that 
comes from the bed in answer to 
the knock, you can bank on it that 
within a half hour or so that wo- 
man will walk into the dining 
room, bright-eyed and cheerful, but 
with a man — well, it's different. 

"A man may leave a call for 7 
o'clock in the morning, and with 
the warning that he must be up at 
that hour. A few minutes before 
7 you detail a boy for the purpose 
and tell him not to stop pounding 
until the man awakes. The room 
may be on the top floor, but you 
can hear the thump, thump, thump 
on the door 'way down in the of- 
fice. Does the man wake with a 
faint 'yes' and scramble out of bed? 
Not he. The boy knocks until his 
knuckles are sore, and then sud- 
denly a stentorian voice roars from 
the room, 'Yes, yes! What in 
blazes is the matter with you? Do 
you think I'm dead' The boy re- 
tires, turns in his report at the 
office and goes to ease his hand in 
cold water. 

"Three hours later a swollen- 
eyed individual, with wrinkles in 
his brow, walks up to the desk. 'I 
thought I left a call here for 7 
o'clock in the morning.' 'You did, 
and the bellboy woke you prompt- 
ly at 7.' 'That's a little too strong,' 
is the answer, and after you've 
argued with him for half an hour 
you haven't convinced him that he 
was actually awakened as he had 
ordered. So it goes day after day. 
The women get up promptly in re- 
sponse to a call, while the men in- 
variably turn over to have another 
nap." 



Totals 81,389,265 $323,981,441 84,927,686 »L>M,771 37.! 



He was ashamed to go home 
empty-handed, and therefore he 
stopped at a grocer's and bought a 
rabbit. "Good luck!" he cried to 
his wife on his return. "Look at 
the rabbit. See where the bullet 
went through him." My cousin's 
wife took hold of the rabbit, and 
at the same time she sniffed, 
grimmaced and turned away her 
head. "You were wise, my dear," 
she said, "to shoot this rabbit to- 
day. To-morrow would have been 
too late." 

Mrs. Benham — Well, if worst 
comes to worst, I can keep the 
wolf away from the door by sing- 
ing. Benham — You can if he has 
a correct ear for music. 



January ti, 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

ENTERTAINMENTS. 

F. M. Smith 

a dinner at the Clarcmont Country (.'Ink 
\\ . S. ivc a reception. Miss 

I >r. and Mrs. R 
mtch Supper in honor ol Miss 

Blanch* 
January 15 (Sunday) Mme. Caro Roma gave a re- 
in in lion, r of Mine. Fanny Francisca. Miss 
gave a tea in honor of Miss Johnson, 

of Vancouver Barracks. Mrs. Frederick Spen- 
cer Palmer gave a tea in honor of Miss Agnes Bu 

chanan. Mrs. C. F. K< »hl gave a dinner in honor 

of Mme. Gadski. 
January 17 (Tuesday ) — The Army Ladies' Card Club 

met at Mrs. Girard's. Mrs. Cole Rnvc a lunch- 
eon. Miss Gertrude Palmer gave a luncheon. 
January IS 1 Wednesday) — The Misses Helen and 

Virginia Gibbs gave a tea. Lieutenant and Mrs. 

Emory Winship gave a dinner. Mrs. Richard 

Bayne was "at home." 
January 19 (Thursday) — Mrs. Irwin gave a dinner in 

honor of Mrs. Gus Spreckels. Miss Viola Meyer 

gave a luncheon in honor of Miss Edna Davis and 

Miss Hodges. Miss Elizabeth Mills gave a tea. 

The Sidney Johnson Chapter, Daughters of the 

Confederacy met at Mrs. Voorhies' home. 
January 20 1 Friday) — The Gaiety Club gave a dance. 

Mrs. George Moore was "at home." The Misses 

Josselyn gave a tea. Mrs. Fred Kohl and Miss 

Kohl were "at home." Mrs. Willard Drown gave 

a tea. Mrs. C. F. Andrews gave a tea. Miss 

Eleanor Morgan gave a bridge party. Mrs. Le- 

land Stanford gave a dinner party. 
January 21 (Saturday) — Mrs. Allison gave a dinner 

party. The Saturday Evening Cotillion Club 

will give a dance. Mrs. Max Rothchild gave a 

luncheon. 
January 23 (Monday) — James D. Phelan will give a 

dinner in honor of Mrs. C. Augustus Spreckels 

and Miss Spreckels. 
January 27 (Friday) — Mrs. Charles M. Cooper will 

give a tea at the St. Francis. 
January 31 (Tuesday) — Mr. and Mrs. William Mayo 

Newhall will give a dinner in honor of Miss 

Charlotte Wilson. 
February 1 (Wednesday) — Mrs. George H. Mendell 

will give a bridge party. 
February 2 (Thursday) — Mrs. Clarence Martin Mann 

will give a dinner. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 
Miss Lily Spreckels to Henry M. Holbrook. 
Miss Belle Harmes to Dr. Alanson Weeks. 
Miss Gertrude D. McCauley, of Colorado Springs, to 

George R. Fiels, of San Francisco. 
Miss Bertha Lincoln to Joseph J. Dlwyer. 
Miss Edith Manning to Robert Beresford Bain, Jr. 
Miss Ethel Wallace to Charles Fickert. 
ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
JamTary 15 (Sunday) — Mrs. Ida McKinley Morse to 

Harry Rowell Cooper. 
January 18 (Wednesday) — Miss Florence Imogene 

Allen to Earle Ireland Holmes. 
January 19 (Thursday) — Miss Alice Bacon, of Santa 

Barbara, to Mr. Thomas Driscoll, of San Fran- 
cisco. 



An Unprecedented Tribute to the High 
Quality of 

Moet ® Chandon 

"WHITE SEAL" 

Champagne 

According to Custom House statistics compiled 
by the acknowledged authorities, S. G. Allaire & 
Son, 3 S. William St.,and Bonfort's Wine and 
Spirit Circular, New York, the importations of 
MOET & CHANDON Champagne for the year 
1904 into the United States were 

127,783 Cases 

exceeding all other brand and BREAKING ALL 
RECORDS. 

William Wolff $ Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS FOR: Moet ® Chandon 
"WHITE SEAL" and "BRUT IMPERIAL Champagnes" 



Did You Ever Stop to Think 

What a pleasure it is to look at pretty photographs? 
Get a camera and take the pictures yourself. We have 
cameras from 80 cents up, and all photographic sup- 
plies. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market street, 




A CLEAN 

RESTFUL 

JOURNEY 

Is the kind you will 
make on the famous 



GOLDEN STATE 
LIMITED 



A new and attractive route through the en- 
chantment of the Southwest, giving daily 
service without change from San Francisco 
and Los Angeles to Chicago via £1 Paso and 
Kansas City. Tourist cars,standard sleepers, 
up-to-date throughout. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC and 
ROCK ISLAND SYSTEM 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January ai, 1905. 



The 1905 




Side Entrance 16 Horse Power Double Cylinder Touring Car 



Call and see it. 



Has Arrived 



Rambler Automobile Agency. IJ3 !^ r A, ffi. ST 

Phone South 1007 



BEFORE PURCHASING 1905 MODEL AUTOMOBILE SEE THE 

PUNGS- 
FINCH 

4 Cylinder $1,800 
Touring Car 

B. B.STANLEY. Agt. 

Sales Rooms— 596 GOLDEN 
DATE AVE., S. F. 





Type VIII. 30-38 h. p. 1905 Pope Toledo. Demonstrating oar has 
arrived. Car guaranteed to carry 5 people on road, a mile a minuet 

POPE TOLEDO TOURING CAR CO. 

G. A. BOYER, Manager 

134-148 GOLDEN GATE AVE., S. F. PHONE SOITB 1142 



Pierce Arrotv 1905 



$5,20 
$5,200 
$5,200 

$4,160 
$3,660 



The Suburban, body by Quinby. 28-32 h. p. 

The Landaulet. " " " 

The Opera Coach, " " " " - 

The Great Arrow, side entrance, aluminum tonneau. 28-32 

h. r- 

The Arrow, side entrance, aluminum tooneau 21-28 h. p. 

These are all four cylinder direct driven machines. The un- 
usual sucoess attended these cars in 1904 is convincing that the 
Pierce Arrow solution of the problem of successful motor car 
building is the right one. This success was recognized by the St. 
Louis Exposition, which awarded the Pierce line the Grand Prize 

MO"BILE C A. 'R'RIA.CE CO. 

Golden Gate A-Oe. and Gough St. S.F. 




J& 


AUTOMOBILE 


SPECIALTIES 


j& 


Geo. P. Moore C8, Co. 
325 VAN NESS AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



Old Neptune seems to have a kindly feeling toward 
the automobile and its users. The success of the speed 
trials and racing tournament on the Florida beach, 
which commence next Monday, depends upon the 
condition of the beach. It might have been so dis- 
rupted by ocean storms during the winter as to have 
made record breaking impossible) but it has not been 
torn up a little bit. instead, Father Neptune appears 
to have laid aside his trident for some sort of a flat- 
iron, and to have been at work all winter preparing 
the beach for the automobile races. According to 
the reports of the various Eastern automobile papeFS, 
the condition of the beacli was never better, and has 
a lewdness, smoothness and hardness that is magni- 
ficent beyond comparison. 

* * * 

The rough roads, deep sand and rocks which have 
heretofore been very hampering to the automobiles 
in rent service between Goldfields and Tonopah, will 
no longer have to lie encountered by the choo-choo 
wagons, for the Tonopah Automobile Company has 
just completed its new toll road between the two 
mining towns. The highway is over twenty-three 
miles long, and cost the company more than $2,000. 
It extends to the Black Butte, going through Dia- 
mondfield and Columbia. The route practically 
parallels the highway leading to Diamoudneld. It 
follows the original road about 2,000 feet, over the 
summit of Gold Mountain, where, on account of the 
steep walls of the canyon, the company was forced to 
widen the county road four feet on each side to give 
sufficient room to passing teams. 

* ♦ # 

Walter Morris returned this week from Goldfields, 
and states that the automobiles will be able to make 
the trip both ways in much less time than heretofore, 
owing to the new road. "The travel," said he, "in 
the deep ruts made by the freight wagons has been 
dangerous to the tires, and the wear and tear on this 
part of the machines has been surprisingly heavy. 
Under the present circumstances, travel will be even 
safer than it has been in the past." Walter Morris, 
it will be remembered, drove the four-cylinder Co- 
lumbia from San Francisco to Tonopah, which trip 
has been recorded as the most wonderful performance 
of a motor-car on the Coast during 1904. Morris, 
until now, has been daily piloting the Columbia be- 
tween Goldfields and Tonopah, and says the machine 

has given unexpected success. 

* * * 

William Kennedy, of San Jose, has also just re- 
turned from Tonopah, and states that many cars 
sent to Nevada to do rent service have been unable 
to withstand the continued hard usage on these road^. 
Mr. Kenndy states further that he took a ride in 
the Winton Quad, which is now in the rent service 
between Tonopah and Goldfields, and which auto has 
been very successful in enduring the uneven, rock}' 
roads of the great mining district. 

* * * 

What may be called a practical competition is 
to be held at Marseilles, France, this year, viz., fur 
motor vehicles capable of transporting heavy Inads. 
The novelty consists in the manner in which these 
vehicles arc to he tested. Each constructor enters 
his vehicle with a declaration of the weight it is in- 



January at, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



hen the vehicle will be 
durii . 1 ,i fortnight t>»r the use of - 

ghts arc traits 
irtniglll thi 
- will ho removed, ami tin- prize- and certifi 
will In- awarded in ace rdance with tin- report- hand- 
by the different factories. This competition 

should In- very popular. 

* • • 

It is about a- good .1- settled that the recognized 

and official record for one mile on a track is 55 4-5 
seconds, made bj Barney • Hdfield in New York dur- 
• because of the probability that 
neither the claim of a mile in 5.' 4-5 seconds, made by 
Karl Kiscr for a performance at Cleveland last sum- 
mer, nor the claim of a mile in 51 [-5 seconds made 

by Barney < lldfield at Denver, in November, will be 
accepted by tile racing board of the American Auto- 
mobile Association. 

* * * 

The French are dissatisfied. I read in one of the 
Eastern auto journal-, because France can have only 
three machines in the international race, and that tie 
club has adopted a resolution not to compete for the 
Bennett cup in 1906 unless the rules are changed in 
this respect. What does France want? To pit forty 
or fifty cars of its own manufacture against two or 
three from each of the other countries? Can't it win 
with an equal representation, or is it just afraid of 
the possibilities of defeat? 

* * * 

M. Pierre de Marglaida, a member of the Algerian 
Automobile Club, has given a challenge cup for the 
automobilist who penetrates farthest into the Sahara 
desert each year. The cup will become the posses- 
sion of the holder after being won thrice. 



*3 




The Best 
Transmission 



Most automobile 
troubles arise in 
the transmission 

case. The transmission of the Cadillac lias BOlved 

one ot the most difficult problems of the automobile. 

It insures perfect running, reduces cost of 

maintenance and repairs and gives 

grr-iU-r ]>"\vcr. It is simple, 

strong and noiseless. 

Every part 

of the 




is built 
with care, thor- 
oughness, and precision. 
The result is extreme durability 
and absence of annoyance to the operator. 
The speed range of the Cadillac is from four to 
thirty miles an hour, the maximum speed being 
easily maintained with four passengers. Let us send 
you booklet A E and give you the name of the near- 
est Cadillac agency where you can satisfy yourself 
that nothingat double the money equals the Cadillac. 
Prices, $750 to $900. 



CADILLAC 

AUTOMOBILE 

COMPANY, 

Detroit, Mich. 

Member Association 
Licensed Automobile 
Manufacturers. 



Model B 

*'.'00 




% 



Perfected Dunlop Detachable Tire 



Solves the problem of 
proper cost for tire 
maintenance. Made of 
the best rubber by the 
most expert workmen. 
No rim cutting. No 
creeping. No pinching 
•of tubes. Punctures 
easily and quickly re- 
paired. 






:< 




TKRADE MAHM 




It can be detached by 
a novice in less time 
than any other tire. Ex- 
pand the ring by means 
of the turnbuckle, re- 
move ring and slip 
outer cover from rim. 

SIMPLE. 
EASY. 

QUICK. 



The Hartford Rubber WorKs Company, Hartford, conn. 



Boston 



New YorK 



Detroit 



Philadelphia 
Minneapolis 



Buffalo 
San Francisco 



Cleveland 

St. Louis 



Chicago Denver 

Los Angeles 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January ax, 1905. 



The only automobile lawn-mower on the Coast was 
recently installed at the Hotel Del Monte. The ma- 
chine is a regulation eight horse-power automobile, 
with gasoline engine, carrying a rotary grass cutter 
in front and a roller behind. It cuts and rolls the 
lawns, and superseding three one-horse mowers, is 
very economical. 

* * * 

The modern creation has accomplished innumer- 
able feats of late in the southern part of the State, and 
a recent issue of the "Times" gives the following ac- 
count of a remarkable trip last month : "There is an 
exciting little secret about the record-breaking auto- 
mobile trip of F. C. Fenner up the side of Old Baldy. 
That automobile came down through a tramp-infest- 
ed road, loaded with $2,500 worth of pure gold from 
the mines, which was one of .the reasons why Fenner 
humped some; which is also one of the reasons why 
Fenner bought the automobile frcm the White agency 
on his return to the city. He has to make frequent 
excursions to the Big Horn mine, and sometimes he 
comes down with gold. As for hold-ups, one might 
as well try to hold-up a streak of daylight. Fenner's 
trip was an astonishing thing in automobile history. 
In seven hours and twenty-five minutes, Fenner, in a 
White touring car, driven by H. D. Ryus, traveled 
110 miles, over desert, across streams, over moun- 
tain roads, making an elevation of 7,000 feet, no acci- 
dents. During the last mile and a half they made a 
rise of 800 feet." 

Numerous physicians in this city, who recently 
purchased up-to-date autos, and are having success 
with them, are beginning to realize the great advan- 
tage the horseless carriage has over the equine. "The 
automobile has come in business to stay, and the 
physicians and business men of San Francisco 
will have to come to the automobile, and the sooner 
they take it up the better." This is Dr. B. F. Alden's 
idea of the capabilities of the motor car, although he 
has only had his Oldsmobile over three months; 
nevertheless, he already finds it indispensable. 

Winthrop E. Scarritt, who is a great enthusiast of 
the White automobile, in comparing the American 
steamer with probably the best of the foreign cars, 
said: "The Mercedes is like the Fifth Avenue belle, 
beautiful to look upon, and attracting the attention of 
every eye when she ventures forth in fine weather. 
But the stately belle must be petted and pampered, 
else there is trouble. The White, on the other hand, 
Mr. Scarritt compared to the country girl, aglow with 
robust health and going about her routine regardless 
of bad weather or other disturbing conditions." 

Among the new motor-car productions creating un- 
usual interest among the motorists of this city, is the 
side entrance model Pope-Toledo, of a thirty to thirty- 
eight horsepower. This car is the most powerful and 
probably the speediest ever driven over the streets 
of San Francisco. It negotiates ti'.e hills as though 
they were level, and with five people, can travel sixty 

miles an hour. 

* # # 

"In presenting this booklet on a subject of growing 
interest and dignity," stales the Autocar Company 
of Ardmore, Penn., regarding their handsome detailed 
catalogue describing the three Autocars of 1904-5, 
"we may choose between glittering generalities and 
platitudes, and an uncolored exhibit of 'the fact 
demonstrable.' We have chosen the latter because 
of the increasing desire on the part of the public, at 
least so far as automobiles are concerned, to learn and 
to know." 



The Pope-Toledo Touring Car Co. has received the 
following telegrams from New York concerning the 
National Automobile Show: 

Earle C. Anthony, President of the Western Motor 
Car Co., of Los Angeles, writes — 

"Pope-Toledo attraction easily center of attraction. 
General opinion equals higher-priced foreign cars, 
both in design and finish, while superior to them for 
use of American roads. Forty-five horsepower car 
absolutely unequaled by any high-powered car at 
show. Many other leading makes have this year 
copied Toledo features of design, control and con- 
struction." 

H. S. Leyman, Assistant General Manager Pope- 
Motor Car Co., telegraphs: "Things all our own way 
here. Our season's output of 900 cars entirely con- 
tracted for." 



Strong Sunlight, Wind and Dust 

Cause Eye Strain. Granulation and Redness. Murine Ey« Remedy 
restores, cures Eye diseases, soothes Eye pain, aids those wear- 
ing glasses; doesn't smart. A favorite toilet requisite. 



SHIPPED FROM FACTORY THIS WEEK 

WATCH ITS ARRIVAL 



Winton Model C. 



»l.05fl 
2.050 
3.8S0 
4.05" 



Model C. lc-20 h. p. (4 cylinder! - 

Model B. 24-30 h. p. 14 cylinder) - - - - 

Model A. 40 h. p. (4 cylinder) - 

Model A, special U cyliuder) - 

Large number of orders already booked. Better get in line. Be- 
meraber that if machine is Dot perfectly satisfactory, we do to 
ask you to purchase. 

We Have 13 Types of Machines for the 1905 Trade 

PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 



901-925 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



Agents: WINTON. OLDSMOBILE and STEVENS-DURl'EA 
Oakland Agency- 355 loth Street. 



&he CADILLAC 





SAN FRANCISCO 



Cadillac won 10 Trophies 
at ibe Del Moote meet. 

Price $950 
With Tonncau $1050 

Canopy top extra 
August Hi. 100i Cadil- 
lac' officially first to 
llniwli in the New 
York ami St. Louis 
run. Kuads neai lj> 
lmpusduble. 

CUYLER LEE, Ajt. 

359-363 0OL.DEN (i,ui 
AVE.. S. P. 



January II, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'5 



Pleasures Wand 

(Continued from Page 13.) 

Under • the Vssociatcd Wives and 

■ an War Veterans, a lecture 
will he given al the Academy "i 
n Kcbruar) .-. at 8 p. m. Subject, "The Voj 
■ ! the Portland Through the Arctic Sea." Mr. 
I. Thomas Flitch, who «as on board when the 
ner mule that memorable trip, and took many 
valuable photographs >>i the midnight sun, no ex- 
plorer ever having been so far North at that season 
of the year. The tickets of admission — 25 cent — 
are to he procured at Sherman & Clay's music store, 
corner of Sutler and Kearny streets. 

* * * 

I understand, with keen pleasure, that Miss Lil- 
lian Lawrence, who has been seriously ill, and who 
has been unable to appear during' this week's presen- 
tation at the Alcazar, is so far recovered that she 
will he enabled to renew her duties at this popular 
se during the coming week. 

* * * 

The third and next to the last week of grand opera 
season at the Tivoli Opera House will begin Monday 
evening, the 23d inst. During the week, several neve 
operas will be heard, including "The Pearl Fishers," 
an absolute novelty in San Francisco; "Zaza," the 
sensational operatic triumph, written by Leoncavallo, 
the composer of "Pagliacct," "Faust;" the Gounod 
masterpiece, and another opera yet to be decided 
upon. 

The great society event of the coming week at the 
theatres will be the benefit matinee of "The Liars," 
to be given at the Columbia Theatre next Thursday 
afternoon, January 26th. The affair has been ar- 
ranged in aid of the Naval Clubhouse at Vallejo, and 
that it will be a brilliant success, both artistically and 
financially, now seems certain. The rehearsals, under 
the direction of Frank Mathieu, show the players to 
be well-fitted for their respective parts in the clever 
comedy, and as the demand for seats is great, the club 
is sure to net a fine sum. The advance sale of seats 
for Thursday's benefit commences Tuesday morning. 

* * * 

When Melba appears at the Alhambra Theatre she 
will have with her no less than five great soloists, as 
well as an orchestra of fifty. It is now announced 
that by special arrangement, Paul Steindorff has been 
secured to direct this immense orchestra. 



Do You Want a Trunk 

At a moderate price, one that looks good and is good? 
Made of genuine Bass wood, brass trimmed, with 
leather straps, and two trays. It is a leader in our 
trunk department, and the price is $8. We have a 
special suit case also at $5.50 that is equally as good 
and cheap. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 

Gas Bills Reduced. 

By making a small monthly charge for the use of 
our Regulator, we reduce your bills and keep your' 
tips, burners and lights in good condition. Gas Con- 
sumers' Association, 455 Sutter street. 'Phone Main 
717- 

George T. Marsh & Co., 214 Post street, has on 
exhibition a complete assortment of Japanese art 
goods. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 30 California street, San 

Francisco, deals In all kinds of newspaper Information, business, 
personal, political, from pi ess of State, coast ana. country. Tel. 
Main 1042. 




View of Turkish Room at 



XL 



Geary Street at Union Square 



=a 



Thomas Greer Walkington has been gathered to 
his last rest. His was a nature that was loved by all 
who were given the privilege of acquaintanceship or 
friendship. He will be missed by a large circle. His 
long residence and vast experience in affairs had made 
him more than usually well known, and among the 
best business elements of the community. The con- 
dolence of the people of San Mateo, and thousands in 
San Francisco, goes out to the bereaved widow. Mr. 
Walkington was one of the first members of the old 
Produce Exchange, a.nd later became a member of the 
Merchants' Exchange. 



Dentist, 806 Market, 
extracting. 



Dr. Decker 

Specialty "Coiton Gas" for painless teeth 



—The evening; at the theatre will be far more pleasant If you 
are looking: forward to an hour at Zlnkand's afterwards. There 
you will enjoy the best food, wines and liquors In town. 



AUTOCAR 4 Cylinder 

DOUBLE SIDE ENTRANCE 16-20 H. P. $2150 




"Science Is organized kno* ledsie"— Assembled In (he four-cylinder Autocar 

The new four-cylinder Autocar is built upon tin* tried Autocar 
principles which have been so splendidly proven. On the level 
the car attains a speed of 40 to 45 miles per hour and is a superior 
climber on any hill This pioduction of the Pennsylvania con- 
cern cannot be surpassed by any automobile at any price. 



MIDDLETON 

606 V»n Ness Ave., S. F. 



MOTOR-CAR CO. 

116-1 18 E. Third St., Los Angeles 



Bed Eyes and Eye- 
lids. Gran u 1 a t e d 
Eyelids and other 
Ere troubles cured 



MURINE EYE REMEDY 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 21, 1905. 




The New Year seems to open fair, and the results 
of tiie business on the Coast for 1904 was of such a 
rosy natuie as to tint with a golden promise the sky 
of the future. 

* * * 

The News Letter's prophecy that the California 
fire losses would be 37 per cent was right. The loss 
ratio was 37.3 exactly. 

* * * 

According to the statements received of the various 
companies engaged in insurance, in all branches, they 
each and all figure out on paper a prosperous year in 
1904. 

* * * 

The statement of the Mutual Reserve and the State 
Life of Indiana are not yet to hand. They may be the 

exceptions. 

* * * 

The Fireman's Fund wrote premiums in San Fran- 
cisco, for the year of 1904, of an amount in excess of 

$138,791. 

* * * 

Col. Wm. Macdonald wrote San Francisco pre- 
miums of over $118,000. 

* * * 

The total San Francisco premiums for 1904 were 
$3,118,746. 

* * * 

The total fire loss for the United States and Canada 
for 1904 amounted to more than $252,364,000. The 
following seventeen fires, with the amount of loss in- 
volved in each case, serves tx> illustrate where some 
of the money went to : 

Des Moines, la., State Capitol Building, $500,000; 
Shelby, Ohio, steel tube warehouse, $1,500,000; Bal- 
timore Md., general conflagration, $70,000,000; Os- 
wego, N. Y., starch factory, $750,000; Rochester, N. 
Y., department stores and other, $3,200,000; Madison, 
Wis., State Capitol Building, $800,000; Toronto, Ont., 
general conflagration, $12,500,000; Yazoo City, 
Miss., business portion town, $1,800,000; Peoria, 111., 
distillery and cattle sheds, $1,000,000; Boston, Mas^.. 
grain elevator and wharf, $700,000; Memphis, Tenn., 
wholesale grocery and other, $750,000; Montreal, 
Que., wholesale grocery and other, $530,000; Winni- 
peg, Man., hardware store and other, $882,000; 
Charlestown, Mass., steamship pier and freight, $6od,- 
000; Minneapolis, Minn., furniture supply house and 
other, $830,000; Sioux City, la., general conflagration, 
$1,860,000; Chicago, 111., three business houses, $600,- 

000. 

* * * 

Wanted by this Department. — A copy of the fa- 
mous circular No. 117 and a copy of the supposed 

paper of Special Agent Tollv. 

* * "* 

The facts of the annual meeting of the Fire Under- 
writers' Association of the Pacific, as written in the 
last number of the News Letter, were about correct. 1 

Mr. Thornton was elected president, and Mr. 
Meade was permitted to retain his title of Secretary, 
but the executive committee is to elect another per- 
son to assume the responsibility, perform the work 
and draw the salary. 

The banquet held in the Maple Room of the Palace 
at the wind-up was a fine affair. Everybody that is 
any body, and somebodies that are nobodies, were 
present. The menu did credit to the Dinner Commit- 
tee, Messrs. Grant and Spencer. The speeches were 



better than usual, and the bubble water was iced 
to the fraction of a degree. 

Mr. E. W. Carpenter, as usual, furnished the an- 
nual song of the evening. The class song, it may be 
called, it is entitled, "To Comrades Gone," and set 
to the air of "America." 

The meeting was a success, and outside of some 
matters not especially interesting to the public, did 
not develop much friction. 

In a recent number of an accident company's paper 
is given some facts that afford soliciting material for 
accident insurance men and interesting facts for the 
public. "Do you know," it asks, "that in 1904, accord- 
ing to the best figures available, 148,367 persons were 
killed or injured by steam and electric railroads in 
this country? That this number more than trebles 
the number reported in 1898? That the proportion of 
passengers killed by the railroads in the United 
States is 100 times greater than the proportion killed 
in Great Britain? That if you were not one of the 
unfortunates in 1904, you may be in 1905? That it 
you are not insured, you ought to lie?" 
* * * 

The Continental Casualty Company, of Chicago, 
represented on the Coast by Manager Betts, has ar- 
ranged to construct its own office building in Chicago. 

* * * 

Judging from the advertising columns of the ex- 
changes, arrangements have been made by those must 
interested to combat the evil that Tom Lawson has 
done to life insurance, and the weapons to be used 
are the columns of the press. 

From the advance sheets received and the tenor of 
the advertisements as to the articles promised, it is 
judged that the companies have decided to attack 
Lawson, rather than to explain their own positions. 

This line of attack is futile. The public has already 
formed its opinion of Mr. Lawson, and he does not 
care a rap what is said about him. 

The public, however, want to know if there is any 
truth in the statements he has made, and they want 
the companies to explain them. It is the public that 
the companies have to deal with now, and not with 
.Mr. Lawson. 

* * * 

Mr. Thomas H. Bowles, who some two or three 
years ago set out to obtain enough proxies from the 
policy-holders of the Mutual Life to enable him to 
vote himself into the management, and wdio after- 
wards went with the Equitable, has resigned,' and is 
now out of the life insurance business for ever, it is 

hoped. 

* * * 

In the list of the leading fifty agencies that did the 
largest amount of paid-for business in California for 
1904, for the Equitable, the San Francisco agency, 
A. M. Shields manager, ranks fourth, and comes 
twelfth in rank among the agents who paid for tin- 
largest amount of individual business in December. 

* * * 

The Fort Collins, Colo., agents have begun the 
New Year by preferring charges against R. S. Bran- 
nen, of Denver, accusing him of overhead writing. 
.\!r. Brannan was the first secretary of the National 
Association of Local agents, and takes refuge in ap- 
pealing to that body for a bill of health clean enough 
to satisfy the poor' locals of Fort Collins. 



January 21, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




J , 



AT SAN GIMIGNANO. 

u ii. n.in-r - Uoniblj 
Ic wind of warm Italian night, 
<■<« hence and carry through a colder zone 
This greeting to im loved one; let the mighl 
< 'i all the passion thai thy land has known 
Urge thee t" speed in recollection sweel 
And guide thee t<> her chamber; enter there — 
Enfold Iti-r sleeping in a dream of )>lis-~. 
Caress her little feet, 

Her lips and all the wonder of her hair. 

And lose thyself forever in one kiss. 

Beloved with the dear .Madonna eves. 

Mv last thought waking is of that young Love 
That leapt full Sturdy from two souls' surprise 
Their union in his lusty strength to prove. 
They were two souls that knew not what they knew, 
And yours was fairer than a god's bright form. 
While mine was little blessed 
Save in the colors that it caught from von. 
What new days hold of sunshine or of storm 

Sleep, dear, to-night with love warm in thy 
breast. 
Wake. love, and watch the dawn that slowly grows 
From gray to gold above the distant wall 
. ( if silent mountains ere tin v flood with rose 

Dumb fer\ent benedictions over all. 
The fair towered city sleeps — a carven stone: 
Adeep. vast quiet hangs upon the air. 

The little hills peep out of warm white mist. 
Surprised that night has flown — 

Drowsed heads with vine-leaves clinging in their 
hair 
And languorous faces pouting to be kissed. 

IN NEWER JOYS. 

By John Winwood iu The Smart Set 
In newer joys than tho-ie we used to know, 
A'e spend our days, and find them goodly so; 
As other folk forget, we, too, forget — 
The moment claims us like a gay Pierrette 
Who sings her song, and laughs, and turns to go. 

The world goes fast — new lover, friend and foe, 
Claim each their turn, for each the scene is set; 
Yesterday's play — is that remembered yet 
In newer joys? 

We dance and drift like leaves the four winds 

blow ; 
Our laughter is so quick, our tears so slow ; 
So much we mock, so little we regret ! 
See, now, I laugh, although my eyes are wet, 
At that poor love we buried long ago 
In newer joys. 

ENCHANTMENT. 

By Louise Morgan Sill in Harper's 
As when a flower holds my eyes enchained 

By its impassioned beauty, so thy face 
Holds me, beloved, till I have attained 

Full knowledge of its grace ; 

And all the muted music of thy breath, 

Tone upon tone, the thirsty silence seems 

To drink, while I to some narcotic death 
Drift on in perfect dreams. 



INSURANCE 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco. Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets. $5,850,000 



Foumlnt A. [1. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OP PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital nmm 

Surplus to Policy-holders ...'...".'.■.'.".".■."■.■.■."^"liTBSSK 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 202 Pine St.. 8. F. 



Royal 



Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Chatter, A. D. 1720. 
Capital Paid-up, 13,446,100. Assets. J24.662.043.3S 

Surplus to Policy-holders, $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over $134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager, 501 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established I860. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets S.34°. I 36-94 

Surplus to Policyholders.. 2,414,921.16 

BB1MJAMIN J. SMITH. Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOTD, Agent for San Francisco. 216 Sansome Street. 

Unexcelled (or liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 



Cash Capital, $200,000.00 



Cash Assets, 387,306.99 



PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

Home Office. 328 Montgomery St. Pan Franeiseo. 
Employers' Liability, Teams, Geneial Liability, Workmen's Collective 
Vessels, Elevators. 

Edmund F. Green, President ; Ant. Borel & Co., Treas. John C. Cole- 
man. Vice-President; Franklin A. Zane. Secretary; Frank P. Deering, 
Counsel. 

MARSHAL A. FRANK. General Agent for California. Hay- 
wards Building. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

ti Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Agt, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 

Organized 1853. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Capital $3,000,000 

Gross Cash Assets n.soo.ooo 

Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourner? 
anywhere in United States. Canada and Mexico, insurance againtt 
loss by Fire, Lightning, Windstorm or Tornado. Indemnity for Loss 
of Rental Income by Fire or Lightning. 
H. L. EOFF. General Agent. 
GEO. M. MITCHELL, Metropolitan Manager. 



210 SANSOME STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 21, 1905. 




The New Year seems to open fair, and the results 
of tiie business on the Coast for 1904 was of such a 
rosy natuie as to tint with a golden promise the sky 

of the future. 

* * * 

The News Letter's prophecy that the California 
fire losses would be 37 per cent was right. The loss 

ratio was 37.3 exactly. 

* * * 

According to the statements received of the various 
companies engaged in insurance, in all branches, they 
each and all figure out on paper a prosperous year in 

1904. 

* * * 

The statement of the Mutual Reserve and the State 
Life of Indiana are not yet to hand. They may be the 

exceptions. 

* * * 

The Fireman's Fund wrote premiums in San Fran- 
cisco, for the year of 1904, of an amount in excess of 

$138,791. 

* * * 

Col. Wm. Macdonald wrote San Francisco pre- 
miums of over $118,000. 

* * * 

The total San Francisco premiums for 1904 were 
$3,118,746. 

* * * 

The total fire loss for the United States and Canada 
for 1904 amounted to more than $252,364,000. The 
following seventeen fires, with the amount of loss in- 
volved in each case, serves jto illustrate where some 
of the money went to : 

Des Moines, la., State Capitol Building, $500,000; 
Shelby, Ohio, steel tube warehouse, $1,500,000; Bal- 
timore Md., general conflagration, $70,000,000; Os- 
wego, N. Y., starch factory, $750,000; Rochester, N. 
Y., department stores and other, $3,200,000; Madison, 
Wis., State Capitol Building, $800,000; Toronto, Out., 
general conflagration, $12,500,000; Yazoo City, 
Miss., business portion town, $1,800,000; Peoria, 111., 
distillery and cattle sheds, $1,000,000; Boston, Mass., 
grain elevator and wharf, $700,000; Memphis, Tenn., 
wholesale grocery and other, $750,000; Montreal, 
Que., wholesale grocery and other, $530,000; Winni- 
peg, Man., hardware store and other, $882,000; 
Charlestown, Mass., steamship pier and freight, $600,- 
000; Minneapolis, Minn., furniture supply house and 
other, $830,000 ; Sioux City, la., general conflagration, 
$1,860,000; Chicago. 111., three business houses, $600,- 
000. 

* * * 

Wanted by this Department. — A copy of the fa- 
mous circular No. 117 and a copy of the supposed 

paper of Special Agent Jolly. 

* * ' * 

The facts of the annual meeting of the Fire Under- 
writers' Association of the Pacific, as written in the 
last number of the A T ews Letter, were about correct.' 

Mr. Thornton was elected president, and Mr. 
Meade was permitted to retain his title of Secretary, 
but the executive committee is to elect another per- 
son to assume the responsibility, perform the work 
and draw the salary. 

The banquet held in the Maple Room of the Palace 
at the wind-up was a fine affair. Everybody that is 
any body, and somebodies that are nobodies, were 
present. The menu did credit to the Dinner Commit- 
tee, Messrs. Grant and Spencer. The speeches were 



better than usual, and the bubble wacer was iced 
to the fraction of a degree. 

Mr. E. W. Carpenter, as usual, furnished the an- 
nual song of the evening. The class song, it may be 
called. It is entitled, "To Comrades Gone," and set 
to the air of "America." 

The meeting was a success, and outside of some 
matters not especially interesting to the public, did 
not develop much friction. 

* * * 

In a recent number of an accident company's paper 
is given some facts that afford soliciting material for 
accident insurance men and interesting facts for the 
public. "Do you know," it asks, "that in 1904, accord- 
ing to the best figures available. 148,367 persons were 
killed or injured by steam and electric railroads in 
this country? That this number more than trebles 
the number reported in 1898? That the proportion of 
passengers killed by the railroads in the United 
States is 100 times greater than the proportion killed 
in Great Britain? That if you were not one of the 
unfortunates in 1904, you may be in 1905? That if 
you are not insured, you ought to be?" 

* * » 

The Continental Casualty Company, of Chicago, 
represented on the Coast by Manager Betts, has ar- 
ranged to construct its own office building in Chicago. 

* * * 

Judging from the advertising columns of the ex- 
changes, arrangements have been made by those most 
interested to combat the evil that Tom Lawson has 
done to life insurance, and the weapons to be used 
are the columns of the press. 

From the advance sheets received and the tenor of 
the advertisements as to the articles promised, it is 
judged that the companies have decided to attack 
Lawson, rather than to explain their own positions. 

This line of attack is futile. The public has already 
formed its opinion of Mr. Lawson, and he does not 
care a rap what is said about him. 

The public, however, want to know if there is any 
truth in the statements he has made, and they want 
the companies to explain them. It is the public that 
the companies have to deal with now, and not with 
Mr. Lawson. 

* * * 

Mr. Thomas H. Bowles, who some two or three 
years ago set out to obtain enough proxies from the 
policy-holders of the Mutual Life to enable him to 
vote himself into the management, and who after- 
wards went with the Equitable, has resigned, and is 
now out of the life insurance business for ever, it is 

hoped. 

* * * 

In the list of the leading fifty agencies that did the 
largest amount of paid-for business in California for 
1904, for the Equitable, the San Francisco agency, 
A. M. Shields manager, ranks fourth, and conies 
twelfth in rank among the agents who paid for tin- 
largest amount of individual business in December. 

* * * 

The Fort Collins, Colo., agents have begun the 
New Year by preferring charges against R. S. Bran- 
nen, of Denver, accusing him of overhead writing. 
Mr. Brannan was the first secretary of the National 
Association of Local rtgents, ami lakes refuge in ap- 
pealing to that body for a bill of health clean enough 
t<> satisfy the poor locals of Fort Collins. 



January n, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»7 




INSURANCE 



AT SAN GIMIGNANO. 
■ Hucn rUbu in Harpai ■ Monthly 

gentle wind of warm Italian night, 

and carry through a colder zone 
This greeting i" mj loved one; let the might 
all the passion thai thj lard has known 
Urge thee t" speed in recollection sweel 
And guide thee t" her chamber; enter tin 
Enfold her sleeping in a dream of Mi*^. 
Caress her little feet, 

Her lips and all tin- wonder of her hair. 
And lose thyself forever in one kiss. 
Beloved with the dear Madonna eyes, 
Mv last thought waking is of that young Love 

That leapt full sturdy From tun souls' surprise 

Their union in his lusty strength to prove. 

They were two souls that knew not what they knew. 
And yours was fairer than a god's bright form. 
While mine was little blessed 
Save in the colors that it caught from you. 
What new days hold oi sunshine or of storm 

Sleep, dear, to-night with love warm in thv 
hreast. 
\\ ake. love, and watch the dawn that slowly grows 

From gray to gold above the distant wall 
( >f silent mountains ere tin v flood with rose 

Dumb fervent benedictions over all. 
The fair towered city sleeps — a carven stone: 
Adeep, vast quiet hangs upon the air. 

The little hills peep out of warm white mist, 
Surprised that night has flown — 

Drowsed heads with vine-leaves clinging in their 
hair 
And languorous faces pouting to be kissed. 

IN NEWER JOYS. 

By John Winwooil iu The Smart Set 
In newer joys than those we used to know, 
Ae spend our days, and find them goodly so; 
As other folk forget, we, too, forget — 
The moment claims tts like a gay Pierrette 
Who sings her song, and laughs, and turns to go. 

The world goes fast — new lover, friend and foe, 
Claim each their turn, for each the scene is set ; 
Yesterday's play — is that remembered yet 
In newer joys? 

We dance and drift like leaves the four winds 

blow; 
( )ur laughter is so quick, our tears so slow ; 
So much we mock, so little we regret ! 
See, now, I laugh, although my eyes are wet, 
At that poor love we buried long ago 
In newer joys. 

ENCHANTMENT. 

By Louise Morgan Sill in Harper's 
As when a flower holds my eyes enchained 

By its impassioned beauty, so thy face 
Holds me, beloved, till I have attained 

Full knowledge of its grace ; 

And all the muted music of thy breath, 

Tone upon tone, the thirsty silence seems 

To drink, while I to some narcotic death 
Drift on in perfect dreams. 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco. Cal. 
Capital. $1,000,000. Assets, $5,850,000 



Found.. I A li. 17«. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 
Paid-up Capital »3 000 000 

Surplus to Pollcr-holdera .'.'...'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. s.oS'.oit 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, M rine St., S. F. 



Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 
Capital Paid-up. $3,446,100. Assets. J24.662.043.3G 

Surplus to Policy-holders, $S,930.431.41. Losses Paid, over »134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch : 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager, 601 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1860. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Asse ts 5.340.136.94 

Surplus to Policyholders.. 2)4 i 4) g 2 i.i6 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOTD, Agent for San Francisco, 216 Sansome Street. 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital J6,700,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 



Cash Capital, $200,000.00 



Cash Assets, 387.306.09 



PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

Home Office. 328 Montgomery St. San Francisco. 
Employers' Liability, Teams, General Liability, Workmen's Collective 
Vessels. Elevators. 

Edmund F. Green, President; Ant. Borel & Co., Treas. John C. Cole- 
man, Vice-President; Franklin A. Zane, Secretary; Frank P. Deering, 
Counsel. 

MARSHAL A. FRANK. General Agent for California. Hay- 
wards Building. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Agt, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 

Organized 1853. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Capital $3,000,000 

Gross Cash Assets 17,800,000 

Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere in United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance againM 
loss by Fire. Lightning, Windstorm or Tornado. Indemnity for Loss 
of Rental Income by Fire or Lightning. 
H. L. ROFF. Genera! Agent. 
GEO. M. MITCHELL. Metropolitan Manager. 
210 SANSOME STREET. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 




28 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. January 21, 1905. 

banking. -— — — — 

Wells Fargo & Co., Bank I ftnQficidl 

SAN FRANCISCO Ifejj^ — ^ 

Capital. Surplu^ and Undivided , $ | 6,000,000 « ■fTHrlfc— — 

Homer S. King. President; F. L. Lipman, Cashier; Frank B. „. _ „ , ?P hlr Stl1 ' han g s , fil "^ with , a 

King, Assistant Cashier; Jno. E. Miles, Assistant Cashier. .flne-£>t. Market. showing OI Ore wlllCll, ill the 

BRANCHES— New York; Salt Lake, Utah; Portland, Ore. „1,1 „ t;„, a „„„,l,l i,„ „„.„.,♦ «.t. 

Correspondents throughout the world. General banking busl- Olden time, WOUKI nave .sent tile 

nes transacted. stock kiting upward into the hundreds of dollars a 

The SoLn Francisco National Bank share - r No « a winze do , wn perpendicularly for a dis- 

Southeast corner of Sansome S1 d Pine Sts., San Francisco ' anCe ° f 95 feet in ore that Will run a long way Over 

James K, Wilson. President; Wm. Pierce Johnson. Vice-Presl- q>IOO per toil IS HOt good enough for the Up-to-date 

ca n snier F - W " Wolfe ' Asslstant Ca!hier; Charles L ' Davls ' Asst ' dealers of to-day. If this does not size up the calibre 

mre&^iffiTpief^i^l^^^^^-F-pove of ' he average stock operator on the street to-day, 

C. S. Benedict, George Aimer Newhall, W. H. Talbot, H. D. nothing can. Any nulling men among them of prac- 

^°|ents-NeV K Torit-Hanover National Bank, Chemical National tica ' millr I would be puzzled to recall another ill:i- 

Ba S k - Boston-National shawmut Bank Phiiadeiphia-Drexei dent of this kind iii their practical experience. This 

& Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— Median- . . ,. . ' , . , ' . , 

lcs' National Bank. Denver— National Bank of Commerce. Kan- Winze, It must be remembered, IS down ill an entirely 

sas City— First National Bank. London— Brown. Shipley & Co. .. „■ nl niiiiio- fn rhp p-ist in an pntirpl-u new 

Paris-Morgan. Harjes & Co. Johannesburg-Robinson South ne " x eln ' running to UK cast. 111 an entirely new 

African Banking Co., Ltd. county. Its importance cannot be over-estimated, 

The Ce.no.dmn B&nkof Commerce vvhilt '" i ' S° e * \° show t he propounded of old the, .nes 

With which is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. ab ° Ut the v,ta htv ° f , the °«-»>eanng lode Oil he Com- 

head office— Toronto. stock at depth, and its limitations generally, were 

Paid-up Capital, $S,700,000. Reserve Fund, $3,500,000 „„„„,,„ w'hpn rhpv ramp nn acr-iinst Elir-li n mo 

Aggregate Resources, over $90,000,000. poor guessers w lien tiic_\ came up against sueli a mo- 

„ ,, n »«■ GEORGE A. cox, President. iiientous question of the kind. This ipse dixit went 

B. E. WALKER. General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. .,.',. , , . , ' . , . 

London office— 60 Lombard St., e. c. lor the time being on the strength ot their personality, 

NEW TORK OFFICE— 10 Exchange Place. t ]._. • 11 Tint thpv wprp miBtntpn in tlipir rali-ii- 

branches in British Columbia— Atlin, Cranbrook, lnat '= an. i nac tne\ were mistaken in iiieir caicu- 

Fernie. Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, lations is now an established fact. The question now 

New Westminster. Vancouver and Victoria. f i .• • ,» c .7 a i 

IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. ui' tor solution is, as to tie extent ot the new hud, 

IN UNITED STATES— Portland. Seattle and HhuRwav (Alaska). am i whethpr it will lead Manv old Comstoi-k minors 

Also 92 other branches, covering the principal points in dnu wnctner u will lead. -Mail) OKI euniMiXK miners 

Manitoba. N. W. Territories, and Eastern Canada. have died, stronger ill a belief of an east ledge than 

BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England. I he Bank of c .,' ° ■ ., , ., ,, & .■ 

Scotland, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd. The Union of London and Smiths some ot them were in the matter of the Resurrection. 

AG^NTS^IN CHICAGO-The First National Bank. ^Ile of the old boys crossed the divide With the SOU- 
AGENTS in new Orleans— The Commercial National Bank. briquet ot East Ledge tacked to his name. 1 his was 
■an Francisco Offic. 325 California street. jj nl Crossniaii, otherwise known as East Ledge 
A. KAINS. Manager. J Bruce Heathco te^Ass^.^Manager. CroMrriM^ from his vigorous defense of the theory 

London, PeLris and American Bank, Ltd. that ore existed in this direction. It may be he was 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. nnt t i.„ f nn i u was Hpnnminatpd bv some neonle 

Subscribed Capital, $2,500,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 not tne IO °l n <- « a s denominated DJ some people. 

Reserve Fund. $1,100,000 Maybe it is so, that an east ledge does really exist, and 

Head Office— 40 Threadneedle St., London, E. C. .. » .. , , ,- , T .. J A . '- _ 

AGENTS-New York-Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- that it has been found. Ill any event, the determina- 

can Bank. Limited. No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y.: Paris— Messrs. .;„.. n f .].„ Pv |-pnt anil nrosnertivp value of thp new 

Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct " on OI Ulc extent ana prospective \aiue OI uie new 

on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' find 111 Uplllr IS HOW the most important issue ill 

cr s d ia GREENEBAUM. Manager; H. s. green, Sub-Mana- mining affairs on the Comstoek. Something may turn 

E er; r. altschul, Cashier. U p at sonle other point along the lode to share pub- 

The Anglo-Ca.liforniBLn Bank. Limited lie attention, but until it does, the development in 

head office— 18 Austin Friars, London. E. c. ( lohir will rank in importance. Who knows, as it 

Capital Authorized, $6,000,000 Paid-up. $1,500,000 . j , ■: ■ 1 . ■. , i i;.,„,i „ , ., 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 stands to-day, if in extent it may yet be listed as a 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, rival nf thp hio- honaiv/a find veal's a< r o ill the C oil - 

make telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit avail- mal °} tne . DI S bonanza nnci years ago mine e,oi . 

able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans Cal.-V lrguua property adjoining, and then tor a lively 

money, bu^an^^el^^change andju.lion^^ Managers mining boom . | )uring tll , ,, ast week the lnark , t has 

t. fried lande r, cashier. i Jeen C ] U H J w ith prices rather weak for even Ophir, 

Security Savings Bank with its Peculiarly bright prospects. 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. . , , r , 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS, loans made. \ large business was dune 111 the stocks OI the 

DIRECTORS-Wllllam Alvord. William Babcock. S. L. Abbot, ... , & .- , 1C ,, ,- t -„<. i„_:_„ t l,„ „,d ,„,.„t- 

O. D. Baldwin, L. F. Monteagle, Warren D. Clark. E. J. McCut- I onopah-Goldheltls districts during the past week. 

chen, R. H. Pease, J. D. Grant. ^ -r-] le tota i sa ] es recorded in the Big Hoard, or the S. 

4 1-2 p.r Cnt lr.ter.st PaJd F. Stock Exchange, aggregated 313,616, and on the 

_, „ _ _. ¥ A . S. F. Tonopah Exchange, 143,200, for the past week, 

Phoenix Invvmgs B. CO. L. Associa-tion respec tively. In the Big Board, the most active stuck 

Pays 4% per cent interest on ordinary savings accounts. Interest on the list was lumbo Extension Co.. of which 52,75° 

compounded semi-annually, and 5 per cent on term accounts of s l lare s changed hands Original Bullfrog scoring top- 

$100 or more. Interest payable semi-annually. notclHn the Other exchange, with a record of 47 ..,CO 

516 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO. °£ The „, £ lhe l ast -named Stock is 

subscribed Capital $8,000,000 . . claimed, to an improvement in this property. 

Paid-in Capital 1250,000 approaching shipment of high-grade ore. 

Guarantee Capital ... 200.000 Star closed weak, under a light demand. Red 

Real estate loans made on Improved property, principal and In- „ , , , ,i____ a _ ,„ „ rpanlt of flip rieli strike 

terest payable in monthly installments similar to rent. Top has ruled stronger, as a result ot tbc rtUl strike 

made some time ago. Goldfields mining is firm and 

directors . n e demand at present prices. McXamara. now 

A. A. Watkins, Charles R. Bishop, s. Prentiss Smith. George considered one of the promising stocks, has been quite 

C. Boardman, Charles E. Ladd, Gavin McNab. Clarence Grange, . " _ 1 t „„ J„l„,l u t,.n,K- rlnrimr Hip u/ppk 

ManaWne Director. active. Sandstorm ruled stead) during till weeK. 



January 31. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



lllllltl'i i|..-i'.| till 

The introduction >>i ■ l>i!l to make 
An Echo of tin owners of an oil pipe line 1 
Old Times, mon carriers enough 

the wild and woolly Wesl about 
it d> i:n< i flavor of old times to the proccedinj 
the 1 ssion of the ' alifornia Legislature. It 

will probabl) cost 9omebody something t.> l;» t ilii- 
impudenl measure out of the way. but it should also 
gislature the necessitj for some 
method of booting bills of the kind overboard with- 
oul oven letting them reach a committee "r attracting 
public notice. Fortunately, offensive effort- ..i the 
kind are getting fewer and tar between in our Legis- 
lature, and the sooner a stop i- put t.> them the better 
it will he f"r the reputation of the State. \\ hat does 
the hill mean. An individual or a corporation, a< the 
case may he. owns enough productive oil wells to war 
rant the construction of a pipe line to transport the 
output to some far-off point of delivery. At a heavy 
expenditure of individual or corporate funds, this 
pipe line is constructed, and its owners are enjoying 
•he benefit of their enterprise and individual invest- 
ment, when along- comes a movement to have the pipe 
line practically declared public property, and at the 
service of every oil producer who feels like using a 
pipe line belonging to some one else. Common car- 
rier in a case of the kind is simply an equivalent for 
common ownership, which, hy a course of reasoning 
running on similar lines, means nothing more nor 
than the absorption by one set of individuals of 
property rights of others, property rights created by 
them for their own special benefit. 



On the local Stock and Bond Exchange, the mar- 
ket is cpiite active for the sugar list, and as a rule, 
prices show still further gains. At latest accounts, 
Alaska Packers showed a decline, and S. F. Gas and 
Electric had a weak tone, which is not unnatural. 
Bonds are in fair demand. 



The demand for oil shares continues rather quiet, 
with prices ruling firm. The following dividends are 
now payable: Caribou, 7c; Kern River, 10c. ; Union, 
70c; L'nited Petroleum, $1.15. 



Local corporations paid dividends during the past 
week as follows: Bank of California, quarterly, $4 
per share; Nevada National Bank, quarterly, $1.75 ; 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company, quar- 
terly, $1.50;- Pacific States Telephone and Telegraph, 
quarterly, $1.75 ; First National Bank, semi-annual, 
$5 ; Pacific Surety Company, quarterly, $1.50; Cali- 
fornia Gas and Electric Corporation, monthly, 25c; 
Presidio and Ferries Railroad, monthly, 20 cents; 
Port Costa Water Company, monthly, 30 cents ; 
Makaweli Sugar Company, monthly, 20 cents. 



The confirmation of the report of the consolida- 
tion of the Nevada National and the Wells, Fargo 
& Co. Bank by I. W. Hellman, Jr., stamps the affair 
as accomplished in fact. A story to the effect has 
been going the rounds for some time past, and its 
confirmation now by competent authority is satis- 
factory. In due time the consolidation will take the 
corporate name, it is said, of the Wells-Fargo-Nevada 
National Bank. The combined assets will approxi- 
mate $30,000,000. According to the story now bruited 
abroad, the Bank of California is in line to absorb the 
business and property of the Bank of London and 
San Francisco, taken in account with the offer of $75 



NEWS LETTER. „ 

the bank building 1 
quoted 1- 

BANKING. 

S«ki\ Francisco S*vvings Union 

■ 1, if : ,x';'" r, ; rnl " F rrwiotaeo, 

watt vi ■'• l ' r 1 "''"'; W /„. c M DeFRRMKRY. ROBERT 
" I \ \< • Presidents; .'>VKI., WIUTr rii.hi.-i- if \t 
WKI.CH. Amlstant Cnshlcr "'""•■ CWHItT, R. M 

u I1 ! r T,°,V F , B , ,V "" 1 ' w ''■ " DeFTBin.iT, H«m P Alien 

u^T^'V^V:;;;-" ' " '■ »•■■•'.»•-■ ".*■■• 

ts nml loans on raal enUtt .iintry 

remittance* may be s.nt by w.-iis. Fun checks 

or reliable parties, payable In hut the rei 

blllty "f this savings bank commences nnlv wllh the nctunt re- 
ceipt "f ilio money. Tin- signature or Hie rlepoaltor should ac- 
company the tlrst deposit No chaw Is mads for pass h.„.k 
or entrance fee. 
Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Satunlnv evenings, r. 30 to s. 

DSDOBltS June 30. 1904 W1W0.1W 

Ouarantee Capital, Paid-up 1,000.000 

Reserve and Contingent Funds ,,,, 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

710 Market St.. opposite Third. 

Ouarantee Capital H.000.000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus r, 6.000 

Deposits, over 9 00 001 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President; S. CS MURPHY Vice-Presi- 
dent; JOHN A. HOOPER. Vice President: GEORGE A STORY 
Cashier: C. B. HOBSON. Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan. S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper 
James Moffltt. Prank J. Sullivan, Robert McElrov, Rudolph 
Spreckels. James M. McDonald. Charles Holhrnok. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities 

Deposits may be sent on postal order. Wells. Farso & Co.. or 
exchange on city banks. 

The German Savings 6. Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $'j,i74.filH.Ri 

Capital Actually Patd-up In Cash 1,000,000 

Deposits. Dec. 31, 1904 37.2M.377.60 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. John Llovd; First Vice- 
President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann; 
Ign. Stelnhardt, Emil Rohte. H. B. Russ. N. Ohlandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt: Assistant Cashier. William Herr- 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muller; General Attorney. W. S. Goodfellow. 

Continental Building & Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 

301 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital $17,000,000.00 

Paid-in Capital 3,600.000.00 

Profit and Reserve Fund 460,000.00 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; William Corbin, Secretary 
and General Manager. 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital $3,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1,725,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or 
Trustee, Check accounts solicited, Legal Depository for money in 
Probate Court proceedings. Interest paid on Trust Deposits and 
Savings. Investments carefully selected. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Andes Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works. Virginia Mining Di triet. Wtorey County. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held on the 22nd day of December, 1904, an assepsment (No. 62) of ten 
(10) cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the secretary at the 
office of the company, rooms 21 and 22 Nevada block, 309 Montgomery 
street, San Francisco. Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 26th DAY OF JANUARY. 1905 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on FRIDAY, the nth day of 
February, 1905, at 1 o'clock p. m., to pay the delinquent assessment to- 
gether with the cost of advertising and ex penses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. „ „ 

JOHN W- TWIGGS, Secretary. 

Office— Rooms 21-22 Nevada block. 309 Montgomery street. Pan Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Seg. Belcher & Mides Mining Company. 

Assessment No. .16 

Amount per share ....5 cents 

Levied Jan. 4.190K 

Delinquent in offloe -Feb. 7. lfltis 

Day of sale of delinquent stock Feb. 27. 1905 

E. B. HOLMES. Secretary. 
Offloe— Boom 50, No. 309 Montgomery street. Pan Franoisco. Oal, 



30 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

"Tony" Piper at Giant No. 3 



By Denuis H. Stoval 

From < Iverland .Monthly. 

The first time he came into the diggings he was a 
short, black-eyed; grizzly-faced, straggly-haired little 
man. His clothes were Far too large for him, so that 
he had much the appearance of a wandering scare- 
crow. He approached Watts, the foreman, who 
was piping at giant No. 3, and asked for work. 

"Did yon ever work in a placer mine?" Watts 
asked, as he eyed him critically. 

"Yes. Ten years ago worked placer mine, Colo- 
rado." His words were sharp and jerky, and they 
gave Watts the impression of a foreign tongue — 
just what, he could not guess. 

"What can you do?" 

"Pipe. Yes, pipe eight years Colorado." 

Watts was in need of a day shift piper for No. 3. 
He had heen operating the giant himself during that 
part of each day when time allowed, hut he wanted a 
regular man. 

"So you think you can handle a giant?" 

"Giant? No savvy." 

"You don't savvy, eh? Well, that settles it. How 
in thunder can you pipe if you don't know what a 
giant is?" It made Watts angry to think he had 
listened to the grasshopper. 

"Giant? You giant call that?" and the shrimp 
broke out into a loud bantam laugh. "You giant call 
that?" he repeated, when he had recovered his breath, 
and pointing his finger at the cannon-like nozzle, 
"We call that monitor, Colorado." 

Watts' angered countenance was brightened by a 
smile. The diminutive individual did know some- 
thing about a placer mine, sure enough. 

To further prove his claim, the loose-clothed man 
brought forth a bunch of soiled and worn letters, each 
introducing Antonio Martinez. They were all from 
prominent Colorado men. ( Ine was from an ex-Gov- 
ernor of the State, and others were from leading min- 
ing men, some of whom Watts knew, for he had come 
from Colorado several years before. The letters 
were eloquent in their recommendation of the bearer. 
According to them, \ntonii. Martinez was an expert 
placer miner, and knew the entire business from the 
superintendent down to the ditch-walker, and from 
the head piper to the diggings roustabout. 

Watts considered himself fortunate. Here was 
just the man he needed. \fter a careful reading of 
the budget of recommendations, he hired Antonio and 
told him to go to the bunk-house and wait till noon, 
when a cut would be assigned to him. After dinner 
he would begin work. He would lake the day shift 
at giant No. 3. 

When the miners filed in and seated themselves 
at the benches about the mess-house tables that noon, 
Antonio Martinez was among them. He was a min- 
now by the side of must of them. They all eyed 
him curiously, and one big miner, between his gulp- 
ing bites of beef and beans, "wondered wdiich wind 
blew 1 hat cricket in, anyhow?" 

Of course, the name Antonio Martinez was alto- 
gether too lengthy for ordinary usage. So they cut it 
down to "Tony," by which name he was known from 
the moment he donned the big rubber boots, coat ami 
hat, and wool mils given him from the mess-house 
store. 

Tony went down into the diggings and relieved 
Watts of his grip on the deflecting lever with the air 
of one who had been a piper all his days. Watts did 
something then he had never done before — put an 



January 21, 1905. 

absolute stranger to piping. His usual method was 
to "break 'em in, first at the diggings, rolling boul- 
ders, blasting, and doing other turns to show that 
they were at home in a placer mine. Tony was 
Watts' one exception in this respect. He took the 
newcomer to be just what the ex-governor and other 
Colorado citizens declared him to be — an A 1 man. 
Tony, on the other hand, did not inquire into the his- 
tory of No. 3. If he had. he undoubtedly would not 
have taken hold of the deflecting lever with such un- 
concern. He did not know that old No. 3 was a man- 
killer; old No. 3 was the wickedest giant in the 
whole battery of monsters that night and day hurled 
their mighty streams against that long and towering 
auriferous mountain wall. The remains of two men, 
in days gone by, had been carried home on a stretcher 
as a result of old No. 3's madness. At another time, 
a Chinaman, working in the diggings, carelessly 
stepped in the way of that hissing shaft of white. 
After a careful search in the diggings the men re- 
ported to the foreman that they had found a strip of 
overalls and a "pig tail." 

Tony did not hear these stories, and it was prob- 
ably well enough that he did not, for he undoubtedly 
would have refused the pipership of No. 3. To him, 
as to all pipers, the roaring, singing monster that 
yielded to the deflector's slightest touch, was a living, 
breathing thing. A giant i-- to him as a tamed lion 
to its master — obedient, harmless, powerful; yet 
when maddened, is wild, merciless, unconquerable. 

Without waiting to see hew No. 3 would act with 
Tony by her side. Watts turned, climbed out of the 
diggings, and walked rapidly along the trail to the 
mess-house. 

The hungry foreman had just set himself down to 
a steaming dinner when there came a noise as of thun- 
der from the diggings below, intermingled with yells 
and shouts. He sprang for the door, where a clear 
view of the three giants was afforded. "Damn that 
Dago!" he exclaimed, as he gave a quick glance at 
the scene below, and grabbing his hat. started on a 
run down the trail. 

The worst had happened. The utmost confusion 
reigned in the diggings. Old No. 3 had "gone wild" 
and was having things all her own way. A little 
block of wood had in some way escaped the strainer 
at the head of the pipe that lav along the mountain 
side like a serpent stretched from the reservoir to 
thr diggings, and coming down, was carried to No. 3. 
The block was too big to pass through the giant's 
nozzle. The deflector was given a sudden wrench, 
and ere Tony knew it, the monster was out of his 
hands and circling round and round on its pivot. Tony 
dodged down instantly, and lay flat on the bedrock 
to escape the great nozzle as it swung over him. He 
dared not run. His minute frame would have heen 
caught in that stream and hurled, a broken, unrecog- 
nizable mass, far out in the diggings. 

The great stream was being thrown wildly, first 




PLUMBING 



Goods 



Oar new Show Rooms are open 
to the public. You are invited to 
call and inspect our display of 

MODERN PLUMBING 
FIXTURES 

unequalled on the Pacific Coast. 
GEORGE H. TAT COMPANY 
49-53 First St. San Francisco 

Send lor Booklet "MODERN RATH ROOM", ' 



January 21, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



3» 



in. then round through I 
thai tow< tin- ridge to thi rig I 

limbs of the trees were stripped l>\ the 

,h -truck h) .« tornado. Then, as the gianl sw 
am «.i- thrown across the ruIcI 
\. and whirling on, dashed across th< 
I'hc nun on the bedrock scurrici 
r. They crept behind boulders and lay Hal i" 
tin- hissing stream that came hurling over • 
and dashed it- avalanche ol water against the moun- 
sidc with every revolution of the giant nozzle. 
The pipers at giants Nos. 1 and -• bravely stood at 
their posts. To have run would have set the remain- 
der of the battery wild. 

Three time- around, and old No. 3 changed her 
tactics. She ducked Iter nozzle downward and the 
white shaft ceased its hissing. The men in the dig- 
gings were safe. But alas tor poor Ton) ! As the 
giant scraped over him. all held their breaths. Bui 
I'ony rolled his diminutive frame into a shallow 
crevice. The giant passed over him. pressed against 
his hack, mashed his face against the hard, slate rock, 
hut never broke a hone. At this critical juncture, 
Watts reached the throttle on the pipe line and shut 
the water off. He then came storming down into 
the diggings. 

Tony, his face cut and bleeding and trembling in 
every limb, meekly met the tile wrath of the foreman. 
After relieving himself of his anger and making 
elaborate use of his entire stocK of profanity, in which 
he cursed the whole line of Colorado ex-governors 
from the time the State was annexed, he put Tony 
to "bucking" boulders in the diggings. Tony wanted 
to explain, but he dared not. He knew the cause of 
it all, but the "cause" had been blown from the 
giant's nozzle, so Watts never knew the truth. 

It was most humiliating for Tony to handle a 
sledge and wheel-barrow, but it was even more so 
to undergo the sneering remarks and retorts of the 
diggings gang. He was silent, sullen, almost sulky, 
hut always busy. He seldom spoke a word, but 
worked like a beaver from end to end of his shift. 
"Small as he was, he could handle more rock than any 
other man in the diggings. He kept himself aloof 
and associated with none of the men. It was sup- 
posed that Tony was an Italian, though so far as his 
brogue was concerned, he might have been taken fur 
anything from a Mexican Greaser to an Icelander. 
There were a number of Italians amongst the crew, 
and believing Tony to be a fellow-countryman, they 
one by one addressed him in their native tongue. 
Tony would only look at them blankly, and exclaim : 
,"No savvy! Yes, I can understand you, no!" This 
was sufficient to satisfy each of them that Tony was 
not a Dago. 

There was one desire paramount in Tony's mind : 
that was, to redeem himself with Watts and once 
more Le allowed a try at old No. 3. He brooded con- 
stantly over his first day's misfortune, but how to 
explain the matter to the gruff foreman was beyond 
Tony's power to figure out. 

One clay, when both he and Watts were in apparent 
good spirits, Tony asked permission to handle No. 
3 for a time. What Watts told him wouldn't do to 
print, but it was forcible enough to wilt Tony's de- 
sire and banish all his hopes of ever becoming piper 
at giant No. 3. 

About a month after Tony's arrival, he awoke one 
night to hear something that nearly curdled his 
blood. Just how he came to awake he never knew, 
but the first sounds that caught his ear brought him 
to his senses with a start. Two of the Italians who 
worked beside him each day occupied a bunk near 



^n I hej m their 

and in low lone- I on) 

-taut. The Italians « < t. p|oi 

i" rob the bedrock 

drift of their cot 

that tile whole thing had ahead) 

that evCT) man of the da) 01. 1 night shift, except him 

-elf. was implicated in the plot. \ large and rich 

pocket had been uncovered b) one of the giant-, and 

the gold of this was to be a part of tin- spoils. The 

following night was set for the robbery. 

Tony la) quiet. Long after the two men had 
1 talking and fell asleep, he remained awake 
thinking, planning, what to do. It was the hari 
work he had yet done at the mine, but when the 
cook'- gong clanged at live o'clock, sounding the first 
breakfast call, he had his plans compli 

That night, the day men retired to their bunk,-, 
and so void was everything and everyone of the com- 
ing theft that Tony almost concluded it was a dream, 
lie changed his mind when, lajter in the night, each 
man silently arose, dressed in the dark, and sneaked 
noiselessly from the bunk-house. When all had gone. 
Tony, too, arose and crept through the manzanita 
that grew to the edge of the cliff overlooking the dig- 
gings. A score of arc lights suspended high above 
brilliantly illuminated the working grounds, making 
the three giants and the men below plainly visible. 
As yet, nothing unusual had occurred. The superin- 
tendent was asleep in his room. Watts was likewise 
asleep at his cabin, and the night foreman was oper- 
ating No. 3. Tony could not believe the night fore- 
man and the two pipers were in the plot. However, 
lie would wait and see. 

Just as the men from the bunk-house emerged from 
the trail at the head of the diggings, Tony noted 



HIGH 

CUSS 
WALL 
PAPERS 

AT ALL PRICES 

Interior 
Decorating 
Ideas and 
Estimates 
Furnished 

L. tozer & 
Sod Co. 

Retail Salesroom 

110 GEARY ST. 

2 ad Floor 

Wholesale Depflrin.cn 

762-764 Mission 
Street 



H. ISAAC JONES, M. D. Eyo, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Office— Starr King Building, 121 Geary street, San Francisco. 
Rooms, 303, 304, 305. Hours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m„ 2 to 4 p. m. Sun- 
day by appointment. Telephone, Private Exchange. 216. Resi- 
dence, corner 6th avenue and 16th St., Oakland. Tel. East 36. 




32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 21, 1905. 



three men walk casually and simultaneously toward 
the three pipers. A moment later, and each of the 
three unsuspecting men at the giant pipes were 
knocked down, gagged and bound. The giants were 
turned from the banks, tied fast, and their streams 
sent hurling to one side out of the way. The men 
from the bunk-house joined those in the diggings, 
and all were soon at work gathering the gold. 

Tony realized instantly that something must be 
done. He could have awakened the superintendent 
and Watts, but he had another plan. He decided to 
fight the whole crew single-handed. He knew there 
would be a man on watch along the trail, so he 
dropped down into the gulch by aid of the clumps of 
chapparel, climbed the opposite bank, and crept up 
to the edge of the diggings. Just ahead of him was 
No. 3, unmanned and throwing her great stream far 
away into the night. 

Noiselessly he followed the shadow of the pipe 
tine. He reached the giant, cut the ropes that held it 
fast, took hold of the deflector, and had the stream 
turned upon the robbing band before they were 
aware that aught was wrong. With a yell that would 
have done credit to a man many times his size, Ti my 
commanded the men to "t'row up" their bands. There 
was a general scamper for safety. ( >ne miscreant 
attempted to escape, but was caught in the giant's 
stream and shot against the gravel bank like a peb- 
ble from a catapult. 

Profiting by the experience of this one, the others 
made no effort to get away. Tony's hand was true 
now, and lode No. 3 responded to his every touch. 
He played the stream around the huddling group that 
stood trembling like a pack of whipped curs. It was 
sure death to attempt escape. 

The night foreman at last came to his senses, and 
began squirming at Tony's feet. He glared up 
fiercely at the little Dago. Tony laughed a loud, 
fiendish laugh as he played the hissing stream close 
over the heads of the robbers. This done to his en- 
tire satisfaction, be cut the night foreman's bounds 
and released him of his gag. The big man jumped 
angrily to his feet, and in a moment would have 
pounced upon Tony, had not the latter yelled : 

"You no savvy, yes. Look, see! Robber devils!" 
Then the foreman understood. As Tony would not 
give up his place, the foreman rushed across to each 
of the two pipers, and after releasing them, awoke 
Watts and the superintendent. 

They came clown, heavily armed, and found Tony 
still laughing in hideous glee as he played the giant's 
stream about the heads of the culprits. 

The next day the superintendent called Tony to 
his office, and while the little Dago stood trembling, 
hat in hand before him. lie was told that he had 
saved the mine of a $20,000 robbery. He was once 
again asked for his letters of recommendation. Tony 
dug them up from the depths of his loose coat. The 
superintendent read them thoroughly, and casually 
remarked : 

"Well, Tony, I guess you'd better take the day 
shift at No. 3. It seems that you can handle her bet- 
ter than any one else I know of." 

When the little Dago took the trail on his return 
to the diggings, he was whistling merrily — something 
lie had never done before he had won the confidence 
he craved. 

Our record for honesty and fairness is unques- 
tioned. When we say OLD KIRK whiskey is pure, 
we mean just exactly what we say — the best on the 
market. 



For your protection remember that 
every bottle of the genuine 

Vve. CLICQUOT 

CHAMPAGNE 

imported direct from France bears the 
additional label 



r ,^A-VIGNIER-G>- 

V*'.™.'C'/-4 • SAr«J FRANCISCO- 

s£jisr SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 



This incomparable French Champagne 
is especially prepared to suit the taste 
of the American market. 

Refuse Substitutes 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

^ — TATE'R — ^ 

Blake. Moffltt & Towne, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland Oregon. 
TEL. MAIN 199. 55-57-59-61- FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



Brushes' 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-housea 
4 laundries, paper-hangers, printers, palntera 
jbilliard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy- 
makers, canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 

Buchanan Brothers 

Brush rifts., 609 Sacramento St., S. F. t Tel. Main 5611 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and commission merchants. 
General agent. 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

Gillingham Cement 

MarKet Street, cor. Fremont 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and Mason 
San Franoisco. Tel. Main 1823. 

E. BRIDGE. Proprietor. 






".••■'*\*5I 

: -J ' 



Mothers be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing Syrup" 

for your children whll. teething. 




DR. W. C. SCHLEY. 

School. 141 Powell St. S. F. 



A REWARD OF $1,000 

will be paid for a ease of 

WRINKLES. FRECKLES, BIRTH MARKS. 
MOLES. MOTH PATCHES, SMALLPOX PIT. 
TINGS, I IHPLES. TAN, SUNBLRN, ACNE, 
SUPERFLUOLS HAIR, PORT WINE MARKS 

and all Fux'ial Bl.m shes that I 
accept for t'eatment and fail to 
cure : : : : 

YOU CAN BE BEAUTIFUL 



Dermatologist 
Store. 229 Powell Bi, 



January at, 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Uha Novelist and the Lecturer 



33 



When Richard Harding Davis, loaded with creden- 
«vcll su|>|>lni| with credit and funds, and watched 
by the whole world a- he departed on hi> mission .1^ 
dent for Japan, returned some >i\ months 
gel out of the infernal hell of shot and 
ball," of which they could only hear rumors across 
the channel, his place was immediately taken l>\ a 
man who had tried unsuccessfully twice before to 
obtain the posi he Richard Barry, an erst- 

while reporter on a San Francisco paper at a salary 
of eighteen >>r twenty dollars a week, was in the 
group of tiie one hundred and titty newspaper men 
conceded ti> he the best of the world's pick, and lie, 
like all the rest, was tired of putting in time in a 
city where there was nothing ti> do hut kill time ami 
spend money. With the Others, he was eager In get 
to the front, an impossible teat, as none of the cor- 
respondents were allowed to accompany the columns. 
Barry possessed no credentials, and it was this fact 
that caused Davis to vote him down at the meeting 
where the other members of the fraternity were will- 
ing that Barry should have a chance. Finally, when 
Davis was about to return. Harry jumped in, and 
was given the covetea chance of getting to the front. 
He left with tile third column, and was permitted by 
those in authority to use credentials which were none 
other than those of Davis. Having got his chance, 
Harry proceeded to use it. He was tne only American 
correspondent in front of Port Arthur when that last 
assault was made. He has penetrated farther and 
reached nearer the defenses of the Russians than any- 
other newspaper man in the Far East. His graphic 
and stirring account of tiie frightful sufferings under- 
gone before the besieged fortress, in all of which he 
held his full share, throb with the recital of horrors 
of which the world as yet knows nothing. Days with- 
out water — without food — are the least of the trage- 
dies which took place daily. His friends here kept 
him supplied with money when they could reach him, 
but $100 for one month, and not enough to buy a 
drink of sake the next, is not the easiest way of liv- 
ing. But it was right here that Barry showed t:.e 
pluck and spirit which have made him one of the be.it- 
known correspondents in his line to-day. He was 
there for "stuff," and he got it. He has literally 
looked down the cannon's throat; he has viewed 
scenes of carnage and slaughter till they are all too 
familiar sights. But he went there to do his work, 
and the results of his "grit" are appearing in half a 
dozen newspapers and magazines to-day. Collier's, 
McClure's, the Century and the London Express are 
glad to handle his work, and he is now in New York 
with over three thousand dollars' worth of contracts 
on his hands for these periodicals, and is writing at 
the rate of two hundred dollars a day. 
* * * 

There is a story going the rounds about Jacob Riis, 
the eminent lecturer and philanthropist, who has been 
so extensively entertained in San Francisco daring 
his visit here, to the effect that there is one man 
whom he has enjoyed meeting above all others. 
When Riis, a husky Norwegian, just arrived from his 
native shores, unable to speak English, a comparative 
stranger in New York, applied at the office of a New 
York newspaper for work, his few English words 
were received with sarcasm and jeers. Baffled, but 
not daunted, he was about to withdraw, when the 
assistant editor of the paper, hearing the discussion 
and liking the look of the fearless Norwegian eye, 
called him back, and entrusted him with a detail. Un- 
able to write English, Riis nevertheless accepted it. 
When he came back with his "story," the assistant 




jjalIio the 

>SUN3 RAYA 

CK 



WITHOUT 

EQUAL FOR 

BRILLIANCY 

SIMPLICITY 

and 

ECONOMY 




IT CAN BE 
INSTANTLY 

ADJUSTED 

TO ANY 

KIND OF 

GAS JET 



The famous BLOCK LIGHT gives more light at less 
cost than any other light manufactured. It burns eight 
parts of air to one of gas. thereby greatly reducing 
your gas bills and at the same time giving an agreeable 
ami powerful light. 

The mantles are the best; the glassware made in 
tier-many under the highest tests and the light com- 
plete fully guaranteed. 

PRAGERS, the exclusive selling agents for 

San Francisco 



BLOCK LIGHT 
COMPLETE 



$1.25 



With Mantle, 
Shade and burner 



fNjin# 

\Mj ALWAVS RELIABLE 

f MARK Em dONES 3TS. 



GREEN TRADING STAMPS GIVEN 



editor went to work to help him. Not only on that 
occasion, but on many others, did the editor aid the 
new reporter in his struggles with a strange language, 
till the result of persistent efforts showed that the 
editor was a master-hand at judging men. That edi- 
tor is the man whom Riis enjoys meeting to-day. They 
are both busy men, but they find time for an occa"- 
sional chat and a cigar, but it is not from the editor 
that this story comes. Mr. Riis' son, Edward, is in 
a newspaper office under much the same conditions 
that his father was before him. Sent on a trip 
around the world, he landed in San Francisco and 
never went further, being captured by a pretty 
teacher at Stege Station, Alameda, whom he mar- 
ried. Edward Riis is a police reporter at the City 
Hall, as his father was police reporter of the slums 
of Mulberry street. The man whom Jacob Riis pre- 
fers to talk to in San Francisco is one well known as a 
literary critic, and whose work is read by thousands 
of critical people — Mr. George Hamlin Fitch. 



15 PAGE'S GLUE T3S 

Does not setquiekly like the old style glue, 
ianti has four times the strength (Official 
iltest, 1 in. sq. hard pine hutted, reentered 
UlUSOlbs. htiUirepartim-'). Used by the best 
a mechanics and iniis.theworhlover. Jnval- 
| nable in household nw, for Furniture, 

.._ 3 China. ivory. I limUs. Leal hor.nnrt wherever 

i5w'' iiVJ'i -, ■!• siroii^ adhesive is desired. 1 oz. bollle 
■:>V;/iH ; Pi!a or collapsible sell'-scalinu tube (reiaile 10c.) 
"Tj mailed ioriei-.rlyourdealerbasiri our line. 
_ * If PACE'S PHOTO PASTE, 

Nono genuine 2 oz. size retails Cc, ; by mail, 10c. 

without L E PACE'S MUCILAGE. 

This Label. 2 OZ. size ret nils tic ; ti\- mail, lac 

RUSSIA CEMENT CO., 142 Bssoi Ave.. tiloucc-Kler, JUais. 




34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January ax, 1905. 



Stanford Jottings 



Two new sororities have been established at Stan- 
ford. The local chapter of Gamma Beta was installed 
last week as the Mu chapter of Gamma Phi Beta. In 
addition to this, another crowd of girls applying for 
a Pi Phi chapter have recently been granted a char- 
ter, although the initiation has not yet taken place. 
This makes six national sororities in establishment 
at Stanford — the Alpha Phi, Kappa Alpha Theta, 
Kappa, Kappa Gamma and Delta Gamma. The rush- 
ing will henceforth be keen, owing to the increased 
competition. The five-hundred limit for women is 
still in force, and the six sororities must recruit them- 
selves from this number — or, rather, from the small 
number of new entrants admitted each year. Seven 
sororities are in establishment at the University of 

California. 

* * * 

.Miss Lydia May Tripp, a senior in the Botany de- 
partment, was married on December 24th to Captain 
John A. Wood, of Oakland. The principal feature 
about the Stanford wedding is that the bride is in 
the early twenties, and the groom in the late seven- 
ties. It is a mating of May and December (without 

any serious intention at punning.) 

* * * 

Dr. J. C. Branner, head of Geology and Mining, and 
vice-president of the University, has just returned 
from an extended tour abroad. He has been absent 
from the University about a year. Miss Elsie Bran- 
ner, a strikingly handsome girl of the brunette type. 
Dr. Branner's eldest daughter, re-entered the Uni- 
versity this January. 

* * * 

A Japanese club is in good running order at Stan- 
ford, as well as an English, a Spanish, a German and 
a French club. Mr. Yoshimi, president of the Japan- 
ese club, is considering the advisability of giving a 
native exhibition or entertainment at the University. 
The other clubs have distinguished themselves by- 
giving farces in their various languages ; but the Jap- 
anese club, thus far, has been rather clannish and in- 
active. An original Japanese play, given on the cam- 
pus, would be something to marvel at, and would 
undoubtedly draw audiences from both universities. 
The Japanese make good students; many of them are 
skilled in the arts and sciences. 



Fill glasses high, 

Bourbon or rye — 
OLD KIRK will make us frisky, 

If sick or dry, 

Be sure to try 
Hotaling's famous whiskey. 

Merchants and insurance men who are located clo^e 
to the California Market, find Moraghan's oyster 
stalls the cleanest and best place for a noon-day meal. 
Steaks and chops and all kinds of fish cooked to or- 
der. 



George T. Marsh, 214 Post street, has the largest 
assortment of Japanese art goods to be found any- 
where in the United States. 

Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only $7.50 

per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Full weight guaranteed. In 
economy, cleanliness and heat producing qualities, Briquettes 
are superior to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th 
and Channel. Phone South 95. 



Clean carpets are a great source of satisfaction. There's 

only one proper way to have them cleaned, and that's by send- 
ing them to Spauldlng's Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama 
street. Thev will come back looking like new. being thoroughly 
cleaned without any Injury to the fabric. 



BOOTHS DRY GIN 



FOR 

COCKTAILS, 
FIZZES 

and 
RICKEYS 
Hilbert Mercantile Co. 

Sole Agents for Pacific Coast 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Comm&nds the 
highest price In 
London &.nd Is 
recognized a. s 
the Best Dry 
Gin tKe world 
over. 



GRAND CLEARANCE SALE OF 

Oriental Rugs 

at 40 per Cent Discount 
on our Sale Prices 



To make an effective clearance sale and realize 
cash, we are giving actual 40 per cent discount on 
every rug. 



MIHRAN'S, 205 Post St. 

The oldest and most reliable rug house. 




TOM 

DILLON 

SCO. 

OPPOSITE 

PALACE HOTEL 

HAT ORDERS 



PRIVATE BOARDING SCHOOL AND 
KINDERGARTEN, 

No. 2514 Pine St., near Pierce. 
'Phone Steiner 3171. 

DANCING, FRENCH, DELSARTE. 



SANTIAGO ARRILLAGA 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Tuesdays and Fridays at Studio 

308 POST STREET, Byron Mauzy Piano Warerooms 

Wednesdays at Residence 

5734 TELEGRAPH AVE.. OAKLAND 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 

Lessons in Painting, Drawing, Sketching and Illus- 
trating. Life classes, $3.00 per month. 

927 MARKET STREET 



January n, 1905. 

CANKER. SORKS 

Otettnate cues o( Concrum Oris h»v« 
teen relieved «itee three or (our applica- 
tions o( 

SOZODONT 

LIQUID 

A complete cure has been effected within a 
week (rem three applications a day. 
wonderful dentifrice. Nothing to equal it. 

IT CLEANSES. HEALS. PRZSERVES. 

3 FORMS: LIQUID. POWDER, PASTE. 



SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thi- 

Music hall audiences are very 
much restricted in Glasgow. In 
one of them a notice on the walls 
says that "Whistling or cheering 
with the feet is strictly prohibited." 

School Teacher (showing off 
her best boy before visitors) — 
Now, Perkins, can you name some 
of the important by-products of 

the steel industry? Perkins — Yes, 
ma'am ; Carnegie libraries. — Puck. 
"You don't belong to one of the 
oldest families, do you?" said the 
supercilious woman. "No," ans- 
wered Mr'. Cumrox; "but after we 
get the girls married we expect to 
have several of the oldest families 
belonging to us." 




jyjANY wise club stewards find 
it more satisfactory to serve 
CLUB COCKTAILS instead of 
guesswork kind. 

No guesswork cocktail can pre- 
sent so perfect a result as CLUB 
COCKTAILS. The choicest of 
liquors, their exquisite propor- 
tions and the necessary ageing 
make CLUB brand the cocktail 
par excellence. 

Just strain through cracked ice. 

Seven kinds — Manhattan, Mar- 
tini, Vermouth, Whiskey, Holland 
Gin, Tom Gin and York. 

C. F. HEUBLEIN & BRO., Sole Proprietors 

Hartford New York London 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

SPOHN-PATRICK COMPANY 

San Francisco. Los Angeles. 
Denver. Salt lake City. Seattle. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

"What have you t.. gay for your- 

lemanded the bailie of the 

drunk and disorderly. "Am verra 

r," returned the charge. 
"but a cam' frae Glesca in bad 
company." \\ hat sort of com- 
panj •" " \ lot o' teetotalers." 

"Wh — at!" r.'.ired the bailie. 
"You mean in say, sir. that ti 
talers are bail cinpain ?" "\\ eel, ' 

rejoined the prisoner, "ye ken 

how it was. A bad a hale inulch- 
kin o' whuskey \\i' me. an' a had 
to drink it all to myself." 

Two worn, 11 gol into a healed 

discussion on a north-bound Ninth 
avenue elevated train yesterday, 

and there was a great craning of 
necks on the part of a score of pas- 
sengers lo hear what it was all 
about. The train suddenly slowed 
up just below Fifty-third street, 
and then the subject of the argu- 
ment was revealed. "Your parrot 
may be a better talker than mine, 
although I don't believe it," said 
one of the disputants, "but you'll 
have to admit that mine has the 
most beautiful foliage." 

"Mabel," said Mr. Sububs, stern- 
ly, "when that young man was 
leaving you at the gate last even- 
ing I heard several sounds like 
kisses." "Indeed !" replied the girl. 
"Oh, I know! What you heard 
was the noise he made pulling his 
feet out of the mud as he walked 
down the path." 

"I wish to take an active part in 
the battle of life. What would 
you advise me to do?" "Get mar- 
ried," wrote the editor of the Re- 
plies to Queries column. 

"As Shakespeare says," re- 
marked Cassidy, who was fond of 
airing his "book larnin" occasion- 
ally, "'what's in a name?'" 
"Well," replied Casey, "call me 
wan that Oi don't loike, an' Oi'll 
show ye." 

Tourist — And did the musical 
genius born on this ranch finish 
his education in Europe. Borax 
Bob — No ; right here in Arizona ; 
he tried to convince some of the 
boys that rag-time warn't good 
music, an' they buried him an' his 
pianner together. — Judge. 

The Professor — Of course, in 
many respects the ancients were 
far behind us in civilization. His 
Wife — Yes. Now, I had never 
heard you say that anybody had 
discovered the ruins of an ancient 
retail drygoods store. 

"What's Gayboy cursing his 
luck so savagely about now?" "His 
wife caught him coming out of a 
jeweler's with a box in his hand. 
Now he's got to buy her some 
jewelry, too, for a Christmas pres- 
ent." 



35 



.O 






No Binding 
When Bending 

'PRESIDENT^ 

Suspenders 

never bind the shoulders or pull the but- 
tons. You cannot get Into a position 
that will defy this "perfect self-adjust- 
ment. There is no strain anywhere. 
That's wily they are so comfortable — 
that's why they wear so long. N ne 
so easy. An absolute guarantee with 
every pair. Price 50c and 81.00, 
every store everywhere or mailed 
postpaid. 

THE C. A. EDGARTON MFG. CO.. 
Box 318 Shirley, Mass. 



When Fame presented her scroll 
the prudent man drew back. "I 
bet it's a chattel mortgage," said 
he. But the fool wrote his name 
down in bold hand. "I told you 
so," remarked the prudent man, 
when presently the fool had parted 
with his all for drinks and cigars. 
—Puck. 

Jeweler — How long have you 
carried this watch? Customer 
(more or less run down at the heel) 
— Well, I've had it five or six years, 
but I haven't carried it much. It 
has generally been in the — er — 
keeping of a relative. 



/L M 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 

Bear the script name ot Stewart 
Hartshorn on label 

Wood Rollers. Tin Rollers. 



\ 



She — Is she a business woman? 
He — Yes. She — What business is 
she interested in? He — Every- 
body's. 



BETH ES DA 



THE GREAT AMERICAN 
MINERAL WATER 



LOUIS CAHEN ® SON. 

! WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

418 Sacramento St., San Francisco 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 21, 1905. 



CLE.ANLINE.SS 



is the watchword for health and vigor, com- 
fort and beauty. Mankind is learning not 
only the necessity but the luxury of clean- 
liness. SAPOLIO, which has wrought 
such changes in the home, announces he* 
sister triumph — 

HAND 
SAPOLIO 

FOR TOILET AND BATH 

A special soap which energizes the whole 
body, starts the circulation and leaves an 
«xhilarating glow. A U grocers and druggists 



"He's fond of literature." "Is he 
a close student?" "I should say so. 
He never spends a penny he does 
not have to." 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 

Designs 

Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sit etch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
Invention Is probably pntentable. Oommunica- 
tlonsstrietlycmitidentinl. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. Oldest apency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Mum & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, $L Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 3G,Broadwa ^ New York 

Branch Office, 625 F St., Washington, D. C. 




15 



50 



jsStylish $ 
Suits 

Dressy Suits £20 § 

Pants $4.50 ^ 

My $25.00 Suits are the* 

best in America. in 

a* 

Per Cent Saved by get-g 

ting your suit made byS 

JOE POHEIM I 

THE TAILOR K 

1110-1112 Market St 8 
201-203 Montg'y St., S. F.5 



25 



ALL THE YEAR 
ROUND TOURS 




by Sea 



Excellent Service, Low Rates, Including- Berth and Meal! 

Lns Ane-eles San Diego Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Taooma 

Victoria Vancouver Etc. 

And to those desiring longer trips to 
Alaska and Mexico. 

For Information regarding sailing; date, etc., obtain (older 

SAN FRANCICSO TICKET OFPICES 

4 New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St.. and Broadway Wharves. 

O. D. DUNANN, General Passenger Agent 
10 Market Street . San Francisco 



St. Augustine was setting out for 
England to convert the barbarians. 
"It's a big job." lie reflected, "but 
I've got to do it. They're pretty 
fierce now, and there's no telling 
when they'll begin to play foot- 
ball.' 

"I'm aw full}' poor, you know," 
began the smitten young man, 

"but " "Well," interrupted the 

frigid-hearted heiress, "I'm willing 
ti> help you along in the world. 
Here's a nickel in pay your car fare 
home." 

Miss Pert — Which half is it 
that doesn't know how the other 
half lives? 
belter half. 



ENNEN'SK* . 



JPILET 
gyDER 



CHAPPED HANDS. CHAFING, 

ind jII afflictions ot the skin. "A little 

higher In price, perhaps, than worthless 

substitutes. But a reason for it." De- 

JLM ^ Ful aft " shaving. Sold everywhere, or 

C« M««'. (ih. orighul), "^ M "^ of 25c " 

s^cJ, fw. GERHARD MENNEN CO.. Ncwork. N. J. 



lightful a 



She — I hope you succeeded in 
retaining your composure when 
your auto capsized. He — Didn't 
Miss Caustique — The retain the first thing; every thing- 
was dumped into the gutter. 




Train* leave and are flue 
to arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Fbom Jasuaky 15, 1903 

Ferry Depot - 

(Foot of Market Street > 



Coast Line 

Narrow Gauge. 

(Foot of Market Street) 



7.00a 
7.00a 
7.30a 

'30a 
8 00a 



8 00a 
8.30a 

8.30a 
8.30a 

8.30a 

9.00a 
9.30a 



10.00a 
10.00a 



MAIN LINE. 



ARRIVE 



7 50P 

7.20P 



6.20p 
7-20P 



7.50P" 
7.50P- 



Vacuvllle. Winters, RuniBey 

Benlela. Elm Ira and Sacramento . . 

Vallejo. Napa, CallBtoga, Santa 
KoBa, Martinez. San Ramon 

NlleB.Traey, Latlirop, Stockton.... 

ShaBtn Express — {Via Davis). 
Williams, willows, tFruto. ICed 
Blult, Portland, Tacoina, Senttle 

Davis, Woodland, Knights Landing. 
Marysvllle, Orovllle 

Martinez, Antlocb. Ilyron, Tracy. 
Stockton. Newman, Los Banos, 
Mendota. Arnumn, Han Cord. 
Vlsalla. Porter v II le 

Port Costa, Modesto, Merced, 
Fresno, Uoaben Junction, Han- 
ford, Vlsnlla. Bakersfield 

Nllee, San .Jose, Llvcrmore, Stock- 
ton, (tMllton). lone, Sacramento, 
Marysvllle. Chlco. Red Bluff .... 

Oakdale. Chinese, Jamestown. So- 
nora. Tuolumne and Angels 4-20P 

Atlantic Express— ORden and East. 5 20p 

Richmond, Martinez and Way 
Stations 6-BOp 

The Overland Limited — Ogden. 
Omaha, Chicago, Denver, Kansas 
City 

Vallejo 

Los Angeles Passenger — Port 
Costa. Martinez. Byron. Trucy, 
Latlirop. Stockton, Merced, 

Raymond. Fresno, GoBtaen Junc- 
tion, Han ford, Lemoore, Vlsalla, 

BajcerBfield, Los Angeles 

Kansas City, St. Louis 



fa. 16a Newark. Centervllle. Sun Jose, 
Pel ton. Uotilder Creek, Santa 
Cruz an. I Way Stations 5 55p 

t2-16p Newark, Centervllle, San Jose. 
New Almaden, Los Gatos.Feitoa, 
Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz and 

Principal Way SlatloilB t10 *j5a 

4. 16p Nework. San Jose, Los Gatos... j ^b'sIa 

"9-30 p Hunters' Train (Saturday only)— 

i?an JtiBe and Way Stations 17 25p 



COAST 

ty~ (Thin 



LINE (llrORri l-niige). 

il Streets.) 



11I To 



4.20P 



4.50P 



4.20P 



620p 

12.20p 



7.20P 



12.00m 

n.oop 

3.30P 



3.30P 
3 30p 



4.00p 
4.30p 



IB 30p 
6.00p 
B.OOp 



Chlci 



g.oop 

7-OOp 
7.00p 



.... Nllesand Way Stations. 

Sacramento River Steamers HI.OOp 

Ben Ida, Winters, Sacramento, 
Woodland, Knights Lauding, 

MnrVHVlllu and Orovllle 10.50a 

Hayw&rd. Nllesand Way Stations.. 7.60P 

P01 1 1 ioeta, Marl [tier, Byron. Tracy, 

Latnrop, Stockton, Modes to, 

Merced, Bcrcndo and PreBno. , . 

Martinez, SniJ Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, 

Calfstoga, s Ituaa 9. 20a 

NMcs. Tracy, Stockton 10.20a 

Hayward. NIIcb, Irvlngtou, San J 18,50a 

Jose. Llvermore | 111.50a 

Tfie <>\\| Limited — Newman, LOS 

Bancs, Mendota, Fresno, Tulare, 
B&kersfleld. Lob Angeles 

Golden Stale Limited— El Paso, 
Kansas City, St. LouIb and 

' blcago 

Bay ward, Nllea and San Jose 

Hay ward. Nile* and Sun Jose 

BaBtorn Express— 1 linana, Chicago. 
Denver. Kansas City. St. Louis, 
Martinez, Stockton. Sacrameuto. 
Colfax, Reno, Sparks, Montello, 
Otideu 12.50P 

Vallejo, dally, except Sunday... I -r cn p 



Vallejo, Sunday only 

Richmond, San Pablo, Port CoBta, 

Martinez and Way Stations 11.20a 

7-OOp K.no Passenger— Port CoBta, Be- 
nlcla, siii sun. Elmlra, Dixon, 
Davis. Sacramento, SparkB, Tono- 

pan, Goldllehl and Keelcr 

B.OBp Oregon & California Express— Sac- 
ramento, Marysvllle, Redding, 
Portland, Puget Sound and East. 
S.IOp Haywanl, Nlles and San Jose (Sun- 
day only) 



6-IOa San Jose and Win Stations 6.31P 

7.00a San Jose and Way Statlitns 5 40p 

8.00a N'*w Almadeti (Tues., Frld.. only). 4-10p 
8 00a The Cuaster — Sae Jose, Su Unas. 
San Ardo, Paso Roblea, Santa 
Margarita. San Luis Obispo, 

Guadalupe, Gavlota, Santa Bar- 
bara, San Buenaventura. Oxuard, 

Btirbauk, Lns Angeles 10 30p 

8.00a Giiroy. HolllBter. Castrovllle, Del 
Monte, Pacific Grove, Surf, Lom- 

poc 10-30p 

9.00a t>»n Jose. Tres Plnos.WatsoiivllIe, 
Capltola. Santa Cruz, Pacific 
Grove, Salinas. San Luis Obispo 
and Principal Way Stations. ... 4-10p 

10.30a San Jose and Way Stallone I 20 p 

H 30a San JoBe and Way Stations. 7.30^ 

2 15p Stiii Jose and Way Stations 8 36* 

3 LLP Del Monte Express— Santa Clara, 
San Jose, Watflonvl)] c, Santa 
Cruz. Del Monte, Monterey, 
Pad tie Grove I2.15P 

'3-OOp Los t-iiios. Wright, Boulder Creek, 

Santa t.'ruz. via Satita Clara and 

Narrow Gauge H0-45a 

7.20P 3 30p Val-ncla St., South San Francisco, 
3-20P Burllngame, San Jose, Giiroy. 

llolllster. Tns Plnos 10 45a 

4.30p Pan Jose and Way Stations tS.OOa 

tS-OOP Santa Clara, S«n Jose, Lob Gatos, 

and principal Way Statluus. .. t9-00A 

{5.30p banJoseandPrlncfpalWayStatl 19.40a 

6 45p sunset Express.— Redwood, Sun 

Jose, Gllroy.Sal bias, 1'asu Rubles. 
San Luis Obispo. Santa Barbara, 
Lob Angeles, Iteming. El Pilbo. 
New Orleans 9 10a 

5-45p EI Paso, Kansas City, St, Louis, 

Chicago 10.30p 

5.45p Pajaro, WatBOttVllle, Cfl ]• I t o la, 
Santa Cruz, Castrovllle, Del 

Monte, Pacific Grove 10.30p 

16.15p tan Mateo. Beresrord,Helmoni. San 
Carlos. Redwood. Fair Uaks. 
MenloPark. Palo Alto '6.46a 

6 30p Shd Jose and Way Stations 6 36a 

8.00p Palo Alto and Way Stations 101 5a 

11 .30p South San FranelBCO, Mlllbme. Bur 
llngame. San Mateo, Belmont, 
San Carlos, Redwood, Fair Ouks. 

Menlo Park, and Palo Alto t9 45p 

o1130p Maylleld. Mountain View, Sunny- 
vale, Lawrence. Santu Clara and 
San Jose .... I9.45P 

OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY 

(Foot of Market St.) 
|7.16 A.M. 9.00a.m. 11.00 a.m. 

1.00p.m. 3.00p.m. 5.15p.m. 

A tor Morning. P for Afternoon 

1 Sunday excepted 1 Sunday only 

t- Saturday only. Monday only 

(Stops at all stations on Suntlav 

8.50a Tne union Tit ANSI' Kit COM HAN V 
will call for and check baggage from hotels and real- 



12.20P 



8. 50a 



8.50a 
7.20a 
9.50a 



7.50a 



11.50a 



dences Telephone, j^xebuuge 83. 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS Warr ?„ D ki, 

Sohmer Piano Agency 

308-312 Post St.,San Franciici 

Received Gold Medal— Hlgnest Award World's Fair, St. Louis, 1904. 











^^»j 








u 





o 

H 



Q 

E 
o 



J3 

to 
o 




O. W. FIELD, 

C. M. SHORTRIDGE 



. i« 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



J. L. FIELDS. 

Secretary. 



OFFICE OF 

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS 

or THE 

BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS, 

616 Clunie Building 



-efaw c&-ta*ieiAce January 21, 1905. , S00 . 



■ To the Board of Directors of the 

Continental . Building and Loan Association, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Gentlemen:- 

In response to your request, we have made an examination 
of the books, accounts and assets of your institution, up to and as 
of the close of business on January 20th, ( yesterday ), and find 
its books and accoxints correct, its assets in good condition, and 
its business sound and prosperous. 

We feel satisfied your institution is in position to re- 
pay to every stockholder every dollar invested and nave a large 
surplus remaining on hand. 

Very truly, Yours, 





Commissioners, 



Secretary. 



Price per Copy. 10 cents 




ESTABLISHED JULY ao, 1856. 

NB^ft|,ETTER 

i^ttlif jo r uia^Kb Jkxjc rt i sjer. 



Annual Subscription. $4.00 




Vol. LKX. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JANUARY 28, 1905. 



Number 



The BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER l» printed and published 
•vary Saturday by ttaa proprietor. Frederic. Marriott, lialleck 
Building. S30 Sansome street. San Francisco. Cul. 

Entered at San Francisco Poslofflce aa second class matter 

New York Office— (where Information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising)— 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy. 
RepresentaUve. 

London Office— SO Cornhlll. E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

AH social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NJSWB 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than I a. m. 
Thursuay previous to day of Issue. 



The Panama Railroad should in no event come to 
be used as a "big stick." 

The blood on the snows of St. Petersburg is re- 
flected in red ink all over the front pages of the 
American newspapers. 

Back East, a cook has died from the bite of a lob- 
ster. ( hit here it is not at all uncommon for a per- 
son to die from a few bites of overdue crab. 



News that a prize-fightei has had a prize-fight 
promoter arrested for criminal libel is good enough 
to warrant a season of public rejoicing. 



The Government wants to know how high Mount 
Whitney is. The average citizen would much rather 
know how high eggs are going to be this winter. 

With the backing of the municipal administration 
and a most friendly Superior Court, the dens of vice 
and the denizens are not caring whether the lid is on 
or off in San Francisco. 



The San Jose man who announces that he intends 
to import a band of monkeys and teach them to pick- 
prunes, is well qualified to give lessons in the art of 
free advertising. 

Dr. Jordan may be correct in blaming the divorce 
evil to the boarding-house, but just think what that 
same institution has done for the promotion of the 
prune industry. 

Some Hebrew-hating humorist must be respon- 
sible for the 'Melican name of the Chinese who, ap- 
plying the other day for a marriage license, said he 
was called "Jew Chew Ham." 

An Oakland judge has shocked the Probate sharks 
by adopting the fee-scale of Los Angeles, where it 
is much cheaper for a man with an estate to die than 
it is in these lawyer-infested parts. 

Colonel Bryan has accepted a job as trustee of an 
Illinois college. He will get a substantial salary, but 
it is to be hoped that the other members of the board 
will not let him conduct any original experiments 
with the funds of the institution. 



The dullness of New York school children, which 
the teachers are now busy trying to explain, may ac- 
count in part for the large public appreciation which 
is said to have been received by the comic supple- 
ment of Hearst's New York papers. 



We think more highly than we did of the Mint- 
Worker-' Union, which has just barred out barkeep- 
ers from membership, 

Mr. Paul Morton seems to be in some danger of 
losing his job. The President is a stubborn man 
when he gels started, and it looks as if Hepburn and 
a few other- had fallen in line. 



An inventive genius suggests that a wax figure be 
made of Czar Nicholas, and that it be driven up and 
down the streets of St. Petersburg, in order to test 
the marksmanship of the mob. 



A trustee's addiction to the un-picturesque habit 
of chewing tobacco has broken up the Mennonite 
Church of Pennsylvania. The trustee is still reli- 
gious, but the front of his shirt continues to bear the 
tell-tale vellow stains. 



According to the veracious press, a Minnesota 
farmer saved a freight train by killing his dog and 
greasing the track near a burned culvert with the 
kidney fat of his four-footed friend. If true, it was 
dog-gone cruel of the farmer. 

A Rhode Island man has asked the Legislature to 
cut off the first syllable of his name in order to in- 
duce the lady of his heart to marry him. Those who 
are inclined to think the lady too particular should 
be informed that the petitioner's name, as it stands 
now, is Bumgardiner. 



The Oregon statesman who got out of the Web- 
foot State just ahead of an indictment charging him 
with crime in connection with enormous land frauds, 
has defended himself most spectacularly in the Sen- 
ate at Washington with a speech compounded of 
equal parts of tears and rhetoric. 

Peace must have come again in Colorado, where 
only a little while ago rifle bullets were whizzing, 
and the "bull-pen" was crowded, for we read that dur- 
ing a recent revival meeting the Mayor of Denver 
shut down all the city and county offices in order that 
the municipal "push" might join in the prayerfest. 

A great newspaper to-do is made over the fact that 
a little woman up in Portland has walloped the stuf- 
fings out of a big man. If there's any virtue in the 
figures and prognostications of the students of the 
race, it will not be long before the press will be 
giving the black type to the little man who whips a 
big woman. 



Now we know why it is that nobody outside the 
island of Manhattan can understand Tom Lawson's 
published ravings about, "frenzied finance" ; it's be- 
cause of the difference in the whisky that is con- 
sumed in Gotham and elsewhere. One drink of the 
New York brand makes a man see things upside 
down, which is the only angle of vision that renders 
Lawson intelligible. 



4 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

THE PIRATE'S FLAG IN JOURNALISM. 
Hearst's wreckers are at it again. They were hard- 
ly rested from their labor of hate in trying to tear 
down and destroy the Realty Syndicate, Oakland's 
biggest and best financial and realty institution, when 
they turned loose their blackmail battery on the Con- 
tinental Building and Loan Association of this city, 
a concern with a State-wide reputation for soundness 
and security, amply capitalized, excellently patron- 
ized and conservatively conducted. For months, it 
has been searching for a spot in this association's 
defense where it could plant a charge of dynamite 
big enough to blow the whole business off the map. 
It has gone so far as to buy Continental stock, and 
then, as a stockholder, put in its "experts," hired ex- 
pressly to find "evidence" of something wrong in the 
books — not hired, mind you, to learn the truth, but 
to produce "proof" on which the Examiner's vicious 
and destructive campaign might be founded. Up to 
date, that campaign has resulted only in a flood of 
venomous abuse of the Continental's secretary and 
manager. The Examiner has failed utterly to shake 
public confidence in the institution. 1 here has been 
no "run" of investors seeking to get back their money. 
As in the case of the Realty Syndicate, the attack 
has been effective only in acquainting the public with 
the large resources of the assaulted concern, the high 
character of its directors, and the great volume of its 
business. 

It may be thought by the public at large that the 
effort to smash the Continental and to ruin with it 
some fifteen thousand persons who have a direct 
financial interest in it, is due to a sort of madness on 
Hearst's part. From being a "trust-buster," it is 
true, he has come to be a habitual buster of anything 
that' looks like aggregated capital— banks, railroads, 
corporations of any kind. The sound of two dollars 
clinking together in anybody's pocket but his own 
excites Hearst to a kind of frenzy which can be al- 
layed only by giving him one of the dollars— or both. 
A business partnership arouses his suspicions; an 
incorporation sets him to digging with both front 
paws, and to howling dismally, while the amalgama- 
tion of two or more companies starts him on one of 
his "busting" spells. The raid on the Continental 
might be charged up to this rabies, or, again, it might 
be ascribed to an internal necessity compelling linn 
to another blackmailing expedition, such as various 
California enterprises have been forced to beat off. 
But the truth is, that this attempt to wreck the Con- 
tinental Building and Loan Association springs from 
something less excusable than hatred of associated 
capital. Its motive is meaner by far than mere black- 
mail. . _ 

The apparent object of this campaign is an ettort 
to wreak a despicable revenge upon Dr. Washington 
Dodge and Gavin McNab. And not only revenge is 
sought, but intimidation and silence. The story is as 
shameful as any that has ever been told about Hearst. 
It begins with the Santa Cruz Convention, when 
Hearst was indulging his other madness and was 
buying, bribing, browbeating, bullying and lashing 
the Democrats of California into an endorsement of 
him that might be used in the St. Louis Convention. 
McNab, who he had injured, or tried to injure, with 
every weapon in his arsenal of assassination, he now 
charges witfe "treacherously opposing" him at Santa 
Cruz Dodge refused to go to Santa Cruz and shout 
and work and spend money for Hearst. 1 he Exami- 
ner begged him to go, and then ordered him. When 
he stood firm upon his refusal, he was threatened 
with such personal, professional and political attacks 
as would make him an Ishmael among his fellow men. 



January 28, 1905. 

A short time ago, the Examiner, knowing that what 
it published was a lie, chaiged that Dr. Dodge, as 
Assessor, had criminally omitted the Monticello 
Club from his assessment roll. For that first slander, 
the resident editor of the Examiner was arrested, and 
is to be tried. Fearing the revelations of that case, 
if ever Dr. Dodge should take the witness stand, and 
fearing also the civil actions which he has announced 
his intention of bringing, the Examiner has unleashed 
its spies and thugs, its key-hole and transom opera- 
tors, its most accomplished vilifiers, to turn inside 
out the private lives and associations of Dr. Dodge 
and Mr. McNab. Its hope was that it could hit upon 
something capable of such distortion and misrepre- 
sentations as would force them to abandon their ef- 
forts to secure legal redress, and keep them from 
otherwise exposing the infamies of the Hearst cam- 
paign. Apparently this quest was bootless. But the 
shabby crew of spies and wreckers found that both 
the Examiner's enemies were high up in the manage- 
ment of the Continental Association, and then the 
siege of that institution began. 

It should be, and plainly it is, enough for the pub- 
lic to know what base and degraded purposes Hearst 
harbors behind his diabolical plan to wreck this splen- 
did and prosperous concern. It is nothing to him that 
it has been most active among the agencies that are 
making California a great commonwealth ; he cares 
nothing about the misery its ruin would bring to 
thousands of California homes; he snaps his fingers 
at the sworn officers of the State who have officially 
examined its affairs and certified to its soundness. 
All Hearst wants is to daub Dodge and McNab with 
filth, and to shut their mouths. 



TO REFORM THE JURY SYSTEM. 
The hardship to business men of the existing exac- 
tions of the jury service laws is the chief reason whv 
the professional juror is possible, and the Merchants' 
Association of San Francisco has undertaken to 
remedy the evil. Every good citizen is willing to do 
jury duty, even when such absence from his business 
is hurtful to it, but he is not willing to be obliged to 
answer to "roll call" every day for an uncertain 
period. The purpose of the Merchants' Association 
is to limit the days of service to, say, twelve days, 
unless the juror be sitting as a trial juror; when he 
would continue at his post until the conclusion of the 
case on trial. 

Business men realize the importance of having 
clean and honest jurors, but they do not feel called 
upon to neglect their enterprises for weeks or months 
to serve the public in that way. And it is that very 
condition of things that lawyers and courts often 
take advantage of to keep the best men of the com- 
munity from serving as jurors. It is not at all diffi- 
cult to dillv-dally with the preliminaries to a trial 
until the better class is "excused," for the reason that 
their business is suffering because of their absence, 
when the professional juror is "accepted." 

Under the existing system, lawyers pay more at- 
tention to the personnel of the jury than to the law 
and the evidence, and hence the business man, who 
would render his verdict according to the law and the 
evidence, and not be influenced by the rhetorical rub- 
ish of lawyers to befog them. What is wanted is a 
jury system that will secure the best men in the com- 
munity for service, but which will recognize that 
their business interests have rights that may not be 
sacrificed, even for the public good. The hand- "I 
the Merchants' Association should lie strengthened 
by every business man in the State. 



January a8, 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

THE NEW FRANCE. 

It a not often that a change of the French ministry 
excites comment. When the Chamber of Deputies 

ministry, it simply refuses .1 "v< 
confidence," and from premier down, the cabinet 
- down ami out But in the case of Premier 
Combes and his fellow ministers, the unusual hap- 
pened, for his cabinet, led l»y himself, surrendered 
their portfolios, in the face of au expression of con- 
fidence by the Chamber, which was. in fact, the final 
triumph of the Combes policy. 

Premier Combes set out to accomplish four things, 
and, in all of them, he eithei succeeded or made ulti- 
mate success certain. The first was the separation of 
church and State. Not a few in this country have al 
ways supposed that the Vatican was the only oppos- 
ing influence to Combes' policy. The Catholic fol- 
lowing in France is greater than all the other reli^" >US 
organizations together, and hence the Vatican was 
the most powerful of the forces at work to overthrow 
Combes, but religionists of the Protestant faith were 
equally interested, for the separation of church and 
State meant to them, as to the Catholics, the abolition 
of the policy of the State providing for the mainte- 
nance of the clergy and their church property. In 
this matter, Combes accomplished enough to make 
complete separation a certainty in the near future. 
The second thing was the cleaning out of the war 
office. It had become corrupt, tyrannical and defiant 
of the civil laws. This he accomplished to a finish. 
The third thing was to cut a whole lot of the cords 
that bound France to Russia by the rapprochement 
entered into some years ago. That very many of these 
cords have been cut, there is not the slightest doubt. 
The fourth thing was closer relations between France, 
the United States and Great Britain. Recent events 
in the field of diplomacy show conclusively that there 
is now an "understanding" between these three na- 
tions that means something more than "diplomatic 
rapprochement " 



THE CASE OF JOHN J. HERR. 

The public will not find it hard to sympathize with 
John J. Herr, who has appealed to the people his case 
in equity against the Regents of the State Univer- 
sity. Herr was the board's auditor of accounts when 
it was discovered, more than a year ago, that the 
secretary, McKowen, had "played the ponies" with 
upwards of $40,000 of University money. There were 
many who, at the time, thought that the auditor had 
been remiss, but facts that were then patent to the 
regents, and since then to the general public, put 
Herr in a somewhat different light. The auditor was 
dismissed, after a star-chamber investigation, and the 
thieving secretary was speedily sent to prison, and 
thus, as the gentlemen in control of the situation, fan- 
cied, the affair was settled. 

But Herr has been trying ever since to get what he 
calls "a hearing and relief." At last he has wearied 
of importuning Governor Pardee, who, as President 
of the Board of Regents, was and is in a position to 
say him "yes" or "no," and has laid the matter before 
the people in a pamphlet that is convincing in its 
form and substance. He quotes some letters from the 
astute Governor, which reveal a strong tendency to- 
ward shiftiness on the part of that sagacious and ex- 
perienced politician. Also, he recites some facts con- 
cerning the Board's business methods that add noth- 
ing to public regard for that body. 

Herr's pamphlet says : "I am informed that to this 
day some of the Regents do not know that their books 
were not written up for months at a time in 1901 and 
1902, and not at all in 1903 until in the ninth month, 



NEWS LETTER. s 

and then only for the first mx months-tins showi 

bow close in touch they were with the pco 

which they were managing a. trustees think ol 

le Regents |„„,|<v not written up nionthi 
trial balance— no statements from I boo|, 

of cash paid out. and what for of cash 
from whom and what for. and all other necessan 
monthly statements t„ enable the Regents to k. 
close touch with tlu- business." 

The scape-oat auditor charges, also, that in fifteen 
years the Regents have not had a competent - 

tary. The first of that period, he alleges, was a po- 
litical job-chaser, who knew no more of 1 k-keeping 

than a pig does of side-pockets; the second was an 

invalid; the third was McKowen. Herr might have 
added that for reasons which they are keeping dark, 
the Regents have never appointed' a successor to Mc- 
Kowen, letting a handy man of the University draw 
double salary while assistants do the work.' 

Rather pertinently, we think, the dismissed audi- 
tor remarks: "There are many citizens, taxpayers, 
who think and say that when a citizen accepts the 
honorable position of a Regent, even if it is without 
salary, that there is something more for them to do 
than the putting on of their Prince Alberts, their high 
hats, the stately march down the hill to the platform, 
and there the doing of the dignified at University 
functions." 

It is not likely that Herr's pamphlet will bring him 
any nearer than he is to the justice he begs, but it 
will serve, at least, to make the public sit up and 
think about the business men who conduct so ill the 
business of the State. 



STREET CARMEN AGREE. 

In view of the action of the Street Carmen this 
week in eagerly accepting a two-year renewal of their 
agreement with the United Railroads, it seems to be 
about time for San Francisco to take the union label 
off the City Hall and let the world know that this is 
no longer the "tightest union town in the country." 
The labor agitator has quit trying to shake down the 
employer and hold up the employee. And yet wages 
remain high and business is either as good as it was 
or better. 

The Carmen were not so easy to deal with last 
spring. They did not know then, as they know now, 
that the anarchists who were stirring them up for a 
fight were merely making ready for a final clean-up. 
At that time, too, the Citizens' Alliance was a con- 
cern the workingmen knew little about and cared 
less. Since then, they have seen this organization 
of the community's best people winning victory after 
victory in the courts, vindicating fully the principle 
of individual freedom of contract as between em- 
ployer and employed — a principle which the labor 
leaders admit in theory and deny in practice. They 
have also seen this association fighting the devil with 
fire, when the needs of the hour demanded it. They 
have come to know, at the same time, that it stands 
for justice from the employer just as firmly as it 
stands for obedience of the law by the employed. 
Very likely, the presence and readiness of the Citi- 
zens' Alliance had much to do with securing this two- 
year promise of peace on the street-car lines. 

The Carmen have shown good judgment in seek- 
ing and accepting this renewal of the compact of last 
May, a distinct feature of which is the declaration of 
the open-shop principle. On its part, the company 
has manifested its desire to deal fairly and even gen- 
erously with its men, by renewing, almost without ar- 
gument, a treaty that was signed and sealed when it 
was weaker and the other party stronger than now. 



6 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 

REFORMING THE PRISON SYSTEM. 
Various bills, having for their object the reforma- 



January 28, 1905. 



tion of the prison system of the State, have been in- 
troduced in the Lower House of the Legislature by 
Assemblyman McKenney, of lone, chairman of the 
State Prisons and Reformatories Committee. .Mr. 
McKenney was also a member of a committee com- 
posed of himself, Speaker Prescott and C. ( >. Dun- 
bar, appointed at the last session of the Assembly to 
investigate the prison system of the State, and to 
recommend improvements upon it at this session. 
The McKenney bills are virtually the recommenda- 
tions of this committee. They embody much of the 
most modern thought on penology, and if they are en- 
acted into laws, the present session of the Legislature 
will not have been without benefit to the State. 

The News Letter has repeatedly pointed out that 
the congregate system which has been always in 
vogue at San Quentin and Folsom, and even at the 
reform schools, is the most vicious that could pos- 
sibly exist. The result of herding young lads, serving 
their first terms in prison, with a lot of confirmed 
criminals, hardened by years of vice, and lost to all 
possibility of reformation, has been to prevent the 
reformation of the first-timers because of the educa- 
tion in crime they receive from their convict asso- 
ciates. It is with some satisfaction, therefore, that 
we give approval to the McKenney bill, providing for 
the segregate system, at Folsom and San Quentin. 
To put this system into full operation at either or 
both of these large institutions, will cost consider- 
able money. and take much time. But the money will 
be well spent and the time well employed, for the 
establishment of modern penitentiaries in California 
will do more than any other one thing to keep crimi- 
nals away from this State. A criminal has no fear of 
such a prison as San Quentin, where the convicts 
lead an easy existence, are not separated from their 
fellows, congregate by hundreds in the yard to play 
and plot, get turkey dinners every holiday, and now 
and again are invited to the house of the Warden to 
enjoy his hospitality. 

The McKenney bills propose sending all second- 
termers to Folsom, and all first offenders who have 
reached manhood to San Quentin. The Whittier Re- 
form School would be reserved for wayward boys and 
girls, not of the criminal class, and the Preston School 
of Industry at lone would become a reformatory for 
young criminals. All the State prisons and reform 
schools, the bills propose, shall be under the direction 
and control of the State Board of Prison Directors, 
who are empowered to classify the prisoners, accord- 
ing to age and character, and transfer them from one 
place to another. All these suggested changes in the 
laws governing the prisons and reform schools are 
worthy of public support, for they are all in the line 
of direct improvement. The committee reached its 
conclusions, as presented in the McKenney bills, af- 
ter a very thorough investigation of the best modern 
prison systems. In their report, they condemn as 
severely as the News Letter has ever condemned the 
conditions governing the State prisons of this State. 
They show that the State is now maintaining, at great 
expense, high-schools of crime. 

The statements of the committee, though severe, 
are mild in portraying the actual conditions. Our 
State prisons have been a disgrace to civilization for 
many years. How much of this disgrace is directly 
attributable to bad administration, it would be fruit- 
less to attempt to estimate. Assemblyman McKen- 
ney should, however, give some, needed attention to 
administration, by introducing a bill providing proper 
qualifications for the Wardens, and some sort of ex- 



amination to determine that a man appointed a War- 
den of a State prison has some greater claim to con- 
sideration than a political pull. All the laws in the 
books will not effect reformation unless a competent 
and honest executive insists upon their enforcement. 

THE CANTEEN. 

As a result of experiment, it is found that, since 
the abolishment of the Canteen, murder and blood- 
shed, riots and disorder lfave increased ten-fold, and 
yet, with this record before them, the "slaves of one 
idea," the prohibition clergy and lay of the country 
are clamoring against its re-establishment. The latest 
to come forward to remedy the evils of soldier life is 
the Rev. J. H. X. Williams, of the Simpson Memorial 
Methodist-Episcopal Church, and, in a bitter tirade, 
he howls defiance at the records of time and experi- 
ence. Reverend Alphabet Williams evidently pre- 
fers the order within the Presidio gates to the disor- 
der without. 

Because he docs not wish the drinking of liquor 
endorsed by the United States Government, the Rev. 
Alphabet Williams seemingly abets and desires, by 
his actions and words, the establishment of houses of 
prostitution and low groggeries. The good doctor 
is the victim of one idea. He is like the balky horse 
under whom a fire has been built. The Rev. Alpha- 
bet Williams has simply moved along, and he is now 
engaged in burning the Prohibition wagon. 

Assemblyman McCartney, the author of the bill 
which made the interlocutory decree a possibility in 
law, has a new bill to propose which makes it pos- 
sible for a woman to demand separate maintenance 
on all other pleas, besides that of desertion. The 
divorce question is oik- of the most difficult of all the 
questions that come before the lawmakers of the land. 
It might easily be supposed that as women are clam- 
oring for equal suffrage that they might induce Mc- 
Cartney to so frame his law as to give women an 
equal chance to "make good" to the man she has 
in many instances wronged. Such a law would un- 
doubtedly be hailed with delight by many divorced 
husbands, divorced because of no sin of their own. 
The News Letter is in favor of equal rights in all 
things. 

FAT FOLKS 

I reduced my weight seventy pounds, bust six Inches, waist 
six Inches, and hips fourteen Inches In a short time by a guar- 
anteed harmless remedy, without exercise or starving. I will 
tell you all about It. Enclose stamp. Address MRS. E. R. RICH- 
ARDS. 225 EAST NINTH ST., RIVERSIDE. CALIFORNIA. 




UCHAS. KE.ILUS & COU 

&£XCL USIVTJb 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

For nineteen hundred and five, we have given 
special attention to the creation of our Spring and 
Summer Clothes, commanding patterns, distinguish- 
ed fabrics, and inimitable styles. 

If there exists any better clothes than offered here, 
we have never seen them. 



12 






January 38. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Lj fc ---—---.jTOWN CRIER jfL 




T-g ^ 



The- if jubilati 

For the falling of the min, 
And the optimistic -~«.-rit»l->" • 

quite a little pain. 
There is no doubt tl^at Pluvius 

la doing pretty well, 
Bui I wonder what is in him 

That should make the sewers smell. 

It's a question which perplexes, 

I'.ut the nasty fact is there. 

It will strike you at the comer, 

Y>ui can smell it everywhere. 
The rain's beyond suspicion, 

It is evidently pure. 

It's the city politician 

That is reeking from the sewer. 

The • laklanil restaurant keepers are going to stand 
for the open shop. That is all right. It would be just 
as well, moreover, if they would provide a better 
class of food than they now purvey. Of all the hor- 
p irs in the eating line, recommend me to the Oakland 
restaurants. They have not improved since the days 
of Bierce. and he had his opinion of them. 

The Grand Jury is struggling with the vice prob- 
lem in the same old idiotic way. Does it never strike 
the sapient members of what is. after all, a very re- 
sponsible and well-intentioned body, that if you drive 
vice out of one place it will seek others, and do more 
harm? Think that over, gentlemen, and do not let 
your Puritan consciences get away with you. 

A French duke. Leon de Talleyrand, died here in 
abject poverty. He must have been a degenerate de- 
scendant, for no Talleyrand should be at a loss to 
provide for himself. Why on earth did he not marry 
an American ? The name is good enough. It is bet- 
ter than Castellane, at all events. 

The title to Mission Park runs from Pio Pico. This 
is quite satisfactory. It is so difficult to know just 
where the title runs to or from, with so much San 
Francisco property. Besides, the property has such 
an inconvenient habit of taking itself off altogether 
occasionally. 

All literary men, and others who are in the habit 
of dodging their grocery bills, are hereby warned 
that there will probablv be an extension of their lia- 
bility to four years. With proper management, they 
ought to be able to double their bills on the ground 
that the grocer's chances are doubled. 

There is much excitement in Oakland over the 
bond election. There is a great running about, and 
no end of corruptible friends of the people who are 
trying to make a deal with the Water Company, and 
the end is not by and bye. The amount of boodle on 
the way is astonishing for so small a town. 

They are going to increase the number of Inspec- 
tors of Hulls and Boilers in this port. It is perhaps 
necessary, but it increases the influence of the union 
of shipmasters, or whatever its name is, and that is 
powerful enough already. 

All this talk about the Anti-Trading Stamp Bill is 
the merest nonsense. The most callow Assemblyman 
knows, or ought to know, that it is impossible to 
frame any such measure with the least chance in the 
world of its passing. 

They have convicted the man who held up the 
clerks of the Stock Exchange. It will now be in order 
to convict the clerks who hold up the Exchange. 



President Wheeler states that the students at the 
I niversitj are avoiding culture and taking up with 
utilities. What on earth does he expect, while I 

Cupiei the position of an exemplar of culture. This 
ix the best thing we have heard of the students for a 
long time. 

The Weber case is now fairly in the hands of the 

lawyers, and we may expect to see all the tomfoolery 

which is peculiar to our proceedings again exem- 
plified. The criminals ought to cease causing us to 
make such exhibitions of ourselves out of common 
charity. 

One very good sign of the times is the increase in 
popularity of the Association game of football. An 

athletic sport which requires skill and good training 
and at the same time has no homicidal tendencies, is 
a very welcome innovation. 

A burglar at San Jose last week, having incau- 
tiously put his head out, a woman in the bed just as 
incautiously put her foot on it. This lead to the ar- 
rest of the burglar, who was heard to remark that 
he had put his foot in it, too. 

Santa Clara County is described as a land of milk 
and honey. I do not know much about honey, but as 
for the milk, it would bear improvement, great im- 
provement. It bears marks of there being something 
the matter with the water supply. 

The city owns a germ wagon for the destruction 
of disease microbes. This sort of thing should be 
stopped, for it is nothing short of cruel to promote 
longevity in these days of trades unions and a city 
Government like ours. 

Sir Charles Tupper managed to make things lively 
for expert Dwyer. He has a certain exceedingly po- 
lite, suave way of making an adversary uncomfort- 
able, which comes of long practice before thoroughly 
trained jurists. 

According to a Redding man, moss is an excellent 
gold saver. What a fine name it would be for a bank 
cashier or the financial secretary of a labor union. 
But then, again, it would all depend for whom the 
gold was saved. 

The appointment of the Judges of the new Appel- 
late Courts which Governor Pardee promises for 
next week, is proof that the longest road and the 
slowest executive must fetch up somewhere. 

Wyman is struggling hard, but he is in a tight 
place. The only trouble is that he is such an exceed- 
ingly small fish to land when there are so many 
whales in the same water. 

Professor Plehn is great on subjects of tax re- 
vision. Will he kindly tell us, first, how to collect, 
and in the next place, how to spend properly the 
taxes we can now raise? 

The proposal to build a bridge across the Carqui- 
nez Straits makes our yellow press howl. These 
radicals are such advanced theorists and so absolutely 
incapable when it comes to a practical proposition. 

The Mayor has not yet made up his mind to white- 
wash the Election Commissioners. He has not enough 
of the fluid on hand. He needs so much for his own 
use. 

After the Trust war has got started in the tobacco 
industry, we are to have one in wine. Keep it up, 
gentlemen, but remember that your product will not 
stand any more adulteration. 



8 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

&/>e Minister Of Foreign Affairs 



January 28, 1905. 



The "uprising" in Russia 
Czarism Doomed, last Sunday was little more 
than a wild and boisterous 
tempest in a large and iron-bound teapot. And like 
a tempest, it quickly spent its fury, leaving wreck 
and ruin along its path. If the storm swept far be- 
yond its center, it was because it broke itself into frag- 
ments at the first contact with resistance and scat- 
tered, but in weakness, though full of sound and 
threatening. The initial force quickly rose to a great 
height, and as quickly subsided. It is always so when 
sentiment forgets to reason — when enthusiasm is 
guided by the imagination, and sees Gibraltar falling 
under a shower of pebble stones thrown from the 
hands of impetuous children. The leader of men 
against tyranny must not be a fanatical priest who 
substitutes icons and the symbols of love and peace 
and righteousness for artillery and rifles. Not bits of 
sticks, but sledge-hammers, are used to beat iron into 
the desired shape. Human liberty is not a gift. It 
is the spoils of victory over slavery, nor does Liberty 
stop to ask the price of victory in human lives. 

But even if it was but a short-lived, though furious 
tempest of public indignation, the spirit of it was 
the spirit of liberty, born of oppression and contempt 
for personal rights with which the Creator has en- 
dowed all men. Therefore, God will ultimately come 
to the people of Russia from last Sunday's exhibition 
of misguided love of liberty combating with logic 
the arguments of the shotted guns of slavery. From 
a labor strike for better conditions of employment, 
the uprising quickly rose to the dignity of a protest 
against Russia's entire system of Government, and 
therein was the seed planted that shall sometime be- 
come a tree to mark the grave of Czarism. For the 
first time in Russia's history is the Czar's divine right 
to rule, and the sacredness of his exalted temporal 
position, denied by the masses. The light of reason, 
justice and personal liberty is beginning to break 
through the darkness of blind obedience to the au- 
thority of assumed superiority. From that viewpoint, 
metaphorically speaking, the bullets that laid so many 
of the common people last Sunday in St. Peters- 
burg will not have spent their force until they pierce 
the heart of Russian autocracy to its eternal death. 
But the greatest good that will come for the pres- 
ent to the people of Russia out of this vehement pro- 
test against Czarism, will come from without. Al- 
ready the working people of France had so changed 
public sentiment against the Russo-French offensive 
and defensive compact, that the Government was 
glad enough of the Port Arthur and other Russian de- 
feats in the Far East for an excuse to cut the stringer 
of the compact's cords, and meanwhile the German 
middle class^was creating an anti-Russian influence 
in their country. Upon the heels of all this comes the 
insulting refusal of the Czar to permit his people to 
present him with a statement of their grievances, 
and by replying to their importunities with shot and 
shell. This brutal act of the Czar makes it impossi- 
ble for official France or Germany, or for any other 
Government, to give him aid and comfort, no matter 
how deep in domestic or foreign entanglements he 
may find himself, for the working people would not 
permit it. In other words, in St. Petersburg last 
Sunday, the Czar arrayed against himself and Rus- 
sia's system of Government the mechanical skill and 
labor brawn and muscle of the civilized world. Only 
high Heaven could successfully resist such a moral, 
intellectual and physical force. But Czarism will 



continue to rule in Russia for many years yet, for just 
now the people are lacking in knowledge and appre- 
ciation of personal liberty in its higher and truer 
meaning; besides, they must find in their own ranks 
a George Washington, and then to a man sustain him 
in the shadows and gloom, as well as in the light of a 
revolution. Czarism has received its death-blow, but 
it will be long in dying. The present upheaval is 
merely the weak and dim light of Liberty's fire of 
coming events. • 

Affairs in the Far East have not 
All Quiet in grown to be of less importance, but 
East Asia. for the moment the attention of the 
nations is drawn to the internal af- 
fairs of Russia, which are threatening the safety of 
the throne itself. However, both parties to the con- 
flict in Manchuria are watching and waiting — waiting 
for favorable weather for the movement of troops, 
and watching for a favorable opening for an on- 
slaught. The Japanese Government is hastening the 
last call for 200,000 of the reserves to Oyama's front, 
and Kuropatkin is receiving reinforcements daily, 
but the fall of Port Arthur has greatly weakened the 
moral tone of his army, and given corresponding 
strength to the Japanese. This, together with the 
crude and undrilled reinforcements, places the Rus- 
sian General at greater disadvantages than he labored 
under when the war began. The real center of inter- 
est just now is in the Vladivostock waters, where 
the Japanese warships are capturing blockade run- 
ners, and through which the Vladivostock squadron 
is expected to make a dash almost any day. To date, 
the Japanese have captured twenty-one blockade 
runners, laden with supplier,, including 25,000 tons of 
coal. 

Next to Russia's internal trou- 
The Schemes of bles, the rulers of the nations 
the Sultan. are carefully observing the 

movements of the Sublime 
Porte in the near East. Believing that Russia is al- 
ready too badly crippled to do more than file a diplo- 
matic protest, and Austria-Hungary disinclined to 
interfere, the Sultan semi-officially announces that 




^r^<WWMnVrtrHMnW(n™(Vftf 



HELLER & FRANK 

INCONPO**TCC 

CLOTHIERS 

Are showing 

a large and 

varied assortment 

of PARAGON 

TROUSERS 

MARKET STREET 
AND GRANT AVENUE 




January 38. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



her in the Haitians will permit, In 
undertake the military occupation of M 
What the Porte i! he intends to inaugurate 

tul keep it up unl 
lacedonia are dead <>r refugees in other 
ly a few months ago, a Russo-Austrian 
ment was announced which provided for a guar- 
- altan that he should institute 
forma in Macedonia and Armenia, and otherwise help 
the people to more independent and encouraging 
conditions. The guarantee of the Sultan was si 
cured without a protest from the Porte, but now that 
m disasters in Manchuria, her internal troubles, 
prevent her enforcing the compact, and Austria-Hun- 
gary declining to interfere alone, the agreement In- 
comes utterly worthless, and gives the Turk a free 
hand in Armenia and Macedonia to resume his old- 
time programme of outrage and slaughter. Quite 
a number of the leading newspapers of Europe arc 
urging a British-Trench-. \merican co-operative 
agreement to inform the Sultan that the moment 
he starts his soldiers to Macedonia, these three na- 
tions will be there to see that he calls a halt. It is 
believing that unless effective restraint is employed 
there will not he a Christian in all Macedonia by next 
autumn. 

The new French ministry, 
The Plans of France, with M. Rouvier at its 
head, is now in control of 
the several departments of State. At the first cabi- 
net meeting, which was held early in the week, it was 
declared in unqualified terms that the policy of for- 



mer Premier Combes would be adhered to in 
that, indeed, the new cabinet would 

continuation of the old 

features of the t 'ombes programme, ■■•. hit h 
ration of church and State, reforms in the army, and 
rular school system, tn this connection, it is 
interesting to note that the Berlin announcement 
that Japan was preparing to invade the Tonquin 
country has become a boomerang to Germany. The 

assurance of Japan that she had never entertained 

such a thought has created another bond of Fri 
ship between France and Japan, and corresponding- 
ly weakened the ties that hind France to Germany. 

Perhaps it is human nature, but the truth is. the fall 
of Port Arthur and the St. Petersburg riots are cre- 
ating an anti-Russian sentiment the world over. 
Verily a turning in the affairs of the nations lias been 
reached, and hereafter Japan and China will have to 
he recognized as powers of character and aggres- 
siveness. 



Picture Frames. 

An immense variety of mouldings for framing pic- 
tures to order; also ready-made frames in all the new 
shapes and every tint and color of mat boards and 
binding papers made. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Mar- 
ket street. . 



You may drink what you like, but you'll get the 
most satisfaction out of a glass of OLD KIRK whis- 
key. It's Hotaling's best on the market. 



ARMAND CAILLEAU Inc. 



Genuine Annual Sale 



This Season's Entire Stock of 

Cloaks, Suits, Skirts, Tea Gowns, Waists, Etc. 
Monday, January 23d 

11 2 to 116 KEARNY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



io SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Harvest Time for tHe 

Crime-Factory at Emeryville 



January 28, 1905. 



BRIDGE the GAP 

TWIXT CONVALESCENCES 
AND HEALTH WITH ' 



The community should clothe itself in sack-cloth 
and ashes, and it should hide its face in shame. We 
are the ones directly responsible for the long 
and endless list of criminals turned out from the 
Emeryville Crime-mill. We are the ones to hang 
our heads in shame. We are the makers of prosti- 
tutes and thieves. Let us glance at the list, and 
while the memory of disgrace, demoralization, degra- 
dation and death abides in our memories, let us re- 
solve to act as men and women in whom there still 
resides one shred of decency. 

We will not speak in detail of the long list of mur- 
ders and hold-ups that may just be laid at the door 
of the RACE-TRACK. Policemen have been mur- 
dered in cold blood by thugs, who prowl about at 
night to make up for the day's losses. Oakland fur- 
nishes the example in the killing of officers Smith 
and Brown. The murder of these officers is not a 
first crime. The criminal has marched step by step. 
until this culmination in the various felonies that have 
finally led them to kill. 

Let, us, rather, take the pitiful record of the special 
cases.' The list is so long, so wearisome, so heart- 
rending, that it can only be given in part and in 
brief. What does this criminal dossier show? 

Captain Neal. U. S. A., with a brilliant career be- 
fore him, sold his future and his family for a pool 
ticket! Bernard Ward, respectable mechanic — now 
at SAN QUENTIN! Why? Bookmakers! Isaac 
Norton, cashier of the Coflector of the Internal 
Revenue — put a bullet in his brain after the crows 
of the track had picket his bones clean — MORGUE! 
Oscar M. Welburn. Collector of the Internal Revenue, 
wrecked and scattered his family, became an ( IUT- 
CAST, caused untold anguish to his bondsmen, who 
had to pay the Government $57,000, the amount of his 
stealings. 

A.'C. Widber, Treasurer of the city of San Fran- 
cisco. From the City Hall to a cell at San Quentin. 
His mother is breaking her heart: his bondsmen had 
to make up $100,000 to the city and county. 

Theodore Feigel, poor, pitiful, bloodless wretch. As- 
cused of murder and theft. He was acquitted, but his 
thousands went to the TRACK. His respected and 
respectable old father is gnawing out his heart in un- 
utterable grief. He is a ruined man— ruined to save 
his boy. 

Cordelia Botkin. accused of murder by poison, boon 
companion to Dunning, cheek by jowl at the RACE- 
TRACK. Awaiting final disposition on appeal for 
murder. 

Peter McGlade, trusted Municipal Officer, RAC E- 
TRA CK— forgerv— SAN QUENTIN. Christopher 
Becker, criminal' genius, rsce-track habitue. Two 
boys, Henry Walker and Francis Dunn, broke into 
a lodging-house, stole a coat and sold it for three dol- 
lars— RACE-TRACK— PRISON. 

Edward Lydon, confidential clerk of N. K. Masten, 
implicitly trusted, embezzled $3,000. Lydon was ar- 
rested in the very act of betting on a race. His 
mother made up 'the loss, and was ruined. Did the 
boy stop in the downward plunge? No! He is a 
race-track-tout. 

William F. Roberts, collector. Stole $500— played 
the races— lost— an OUTCAST. John Dougherty 
and Bernard Ward, accused of robbing the Ma- 
rine Fire Insurance Companv, played the HORSES. 
A. J. Bergmann, plunger at the TRACK. Bergmann 



LIEBIG 

COMPANY'S 
EXTRACT / £ mm 

OF BEEF^^ JF HAS THIS 

SIGNATURE 

IN BLUE: 



was cashier for the California Ink Company. Robbed 
his employers of $5,000. Sent to SAN QUENTIN 
for three vears. Claus Isaakson, Secretary of the Pa- 
cific Rolling Mills— RACK-TRACK— robbed his em- 
ployers of S4.000 — OUTCAST. William J. Lyons, 
bookkeeper for the Pacific Gas Companv — RACE- 
TRACK— crime— Ml >RGl'E. Oscar Anderson, 
robbed Charles Nelson of $800 — now an OUTCAST. 
Robert Lawson — crime and forgery — RACE- 
TRACK— two years at SAX QUENTIN. Daniel 
Lynch — good fellow and trusted bookkeeper for An- 
derson & Companv — RACE-TRACK — embezzled 
$2,200— SAX QUENTIN. Bavard Saville— RACE- 
TRACK— STAFF'S PRISON. 

Henry Sloan — RACE-TRACK — forgery — embez- 
zlement— SAX QUENTIN. Here is a job lot of 
RACE-TRACK MADE CONVICTS: Stephen 
Rosenbaum; W. F. Rodgers and his son; Williams, 
who forged the name of Leland Stanford. J. E. 
Bachman, respectable— RACE-TRACK— EMBEZ- 
ZLEMENT— STATE'S PRISON'. John W. Jordan, 
robbed the mails at the Post-office — PENITEN- 
TIARY FOR ONE YEAR— RACE-TRACK. Chas. 
T. lansen. fictitious checks— RACE-TRACK, SAN 
uf ENT1 X. lames D. PAGE, ex-United States Dis- 
trict Attorney— RACE-TRACK— SAN QUENTIN 
— ten vears. Fred Conwav, Police Court Clerk — 
RACE-TRACK— embezzled bail money— OUT- 
CAST. W. A. McKowen. Secretary of the Board of 
Regents — stole $40,000 and is now in PRISON. The 
RACE-TRACK was directly responsible for the ruin 
of this young man. Mrs. Elizabeth Shields — RACE- 
TRACK — set fire to her home for the insurance — IN 
PRISON. .Mrs. Kate Malcomson— RACE-TRACK 
— set fire to her home — PRISON. 

It is time to call a halt on this alreadv fearful and 
long list of RACE-TRACK-MADE-CRT MINALS. 
What tre you going to do about it? We ask the 
clergy, we ask the people, we ask the people's ser- 
vants, the Legislature, and the community in gene- 
ral. Isn't it about time to stop the Crime-mill? 

These are convicted RACE-TRACK-MADE 
FELONS: there are thousands of others who stand 
unconvicted. We will give the names of a few of 
them later on. The Legislature is in session. It is 
time now to act. How about it? 



Make a "holler" if you don't get Hotaling's OLD 
KIRK whisky. It's pure. Hotaling says so. 



January 38. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



Ppleasl) re's Wand 













W\ 




J 






Ti 


••»%. 


•?% 






1 i ' J m^^-- 




T i\ 


Irn^m 


1 y^t 




f ' 7 f 


1 ' * "lV 1 6 




•■ 


f^n 





Bertha Gleeson, the dainty dancer, who will appear 
with her brother, John, and Fred Houlihan, at the 
Orpheum Sunday afternoon. 
* * * 

Miss Lillian Lawrence returned to the Alcazar 
Theatre last Monday night, after quite a severe ill- 
ness, to play the part of Yvonne in "The Conquer- 
ors," by Paul M. Potter. She was looking prettier 
than I have ever seen her, but seemed tired, and not, 
to my way of thinking, by any means entirely recov- 
ered. Her acting, however, left nothing to be de- 
sired, and in the second act, when trapped by Von 
Rodeck in The Cabaret of the "Silver Trout," and be- 
lieving she is about to lose that which she holds most 
dear, she ceases to plead, and tells him, The 
Conqueror, to take her, the conquered, for his 
victim, she more than rose to the occasion. Here, 
too, Craig, as Von Rodeck, was seen at his best. His 
change of front from would-be seducer to pleader for 
mercy and forgiveness was a forcible piece of acting, 
and drew from him his very best. To these parts 
Mr. Craig seems specially suited, as his all-round 
clever work proved on Monday night. 

The lighter vein of "The Conquerors" is in the very 
safe keeping of Miss Elizabeth Woodson as Babiole, 
sister of Yvonne, and Harry Hilliard, as Captain 
Theobald Korner. Miss Woodson made a very 
sweet, pretty picture as Babiole, and acted with the 
grace and delicateness that long since endeared her 
to the Alcazar audiences, and Hilliard was refreshing 
as Korner, the young Prussian captain. Miss Adele 
Belgarde, as Jeanne Marie, wife to Bobeche, the 
owner of the "Silver Trout," gave us a very thorough 
insight into the part, and Luke Conness, as Hugo, 
Baron of Grandpre, was strong in the role of the 
refugee Frenchman. 



The first two .ui- ..f riic Conquerors" are unde- 
niably clever, but the third act seems to me a trifle 
unnatural. The woman Yvonne thinks she has been 
betrayed bv Von Rodeck, decides to kill him. and 

drives a knife int.) his side. She glories in liis death. 
when suddenly he groans. She rushes toward him to 
finish her work, but suddenly changes her mind and 
tears off to gel water for his parched throat, 
and lies to save him from her brother'-, fury. I 
ybu find her hiding him in her own bedroom, ami 

refusing to allow her brother to pass through the 
room, though the window beyond is the only exit 
which is not guarded. One has heard of hatred 
changing to love, but this seemed to me the quickest 
change on record. 

* * * 

1 must say that when I heard they were going to 
present "The Holy City" at the Central Theatre, I 
felt a keen desire to see what the Central company 
would do with a Biblical play, and now that I have 
seen them, f am most agreeably surprised, not that 
1 don't know how well the clever people up at the 
Central can turn hands and brains to anything, biit 
from minstrels to John the Baptists and Salomes 
does seem a bit of a jump, doesn't it? "The Holy 
City" is not a masterpiece, by any means. It seems 
to hold in it a conglomeration of plays I have seen, 
and books I have read, and there appears lacking in it 
that which was most prominent in them, the fire of 
genius. Whatever the play lacks, the actors make up 
for. Herschel Mayall played the role of Marius 
soundly, and did much with the opportunities offered 
him, and Miss Myrtle Vane, as Salome, in her dance 
before Herod, made a distinct sensation. At the com- 
pletion of the dance came that which rejoiced the gal- 
lery. Herod, excellently lived up to . by George P. . 
Webster, bids Salome name her own reward. Hero- 
dias, ably played by Miss Juliet Crosby, who received 
a rousing welcome on her return, suggests to Salome 




William Collier, in "The Dictator," at the Columbia. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 28, 1905. 



the Head of John the Baptist. So John the Baptist's 
head is brought in on a charger, and the gallery sits 
tight, and when the mother of John, an excellent pre- 
sentation by .Miss Julia Blanc, takes the head and 
shakes it in his slayer's face, the gallery realizes what 
realism is. 

The company works hard and does comprehensive 
work, and too much praise cannot be given them ; 
nor to the man behind the scenes, to whom we must 
take off our hats for the splendid scenic effects pro- 
duced. 




Joseph Cawthorn, who will appear in "Mother 
Goose," at the Grand Opera House. 

* * * 

For the first time on this coast, I believe, Leon- 
cavallo's "Zaza" was produced at the Tivoli Opera 
House on last Wednesday night, and Berlindi made it 
a success. The orchestration of this opera is very 
beautiful, and the music is rhythmic and smooth, but 
it requires not only a singer, but an actress, to carry 
it off. Such I found Berlindi, and such the audience 
found her at the end of the third act. This act opened 
most propitiously. Colli, in the role of Milio Du- 
fresne, secured a well deserved encore for his opening 
number. Then came the meeting in Dufresne's house 
of Zaza and his little girl, very sweetly enacted by 
Signorina Tofanelli, a part difficult to take in that 
she perforce spoke her lines, and here Berlini. who 
had already shown us the actress in the second act, 
gave us, in the questioning of the child, the excuses 
to the mother, and the final exit, a true insight to her 
powers. The house rose to her, and gave her her due, 



and boys came rushing down the aisles with baskets 
of flowers, which she hugged to her bosom, as she 
graciously bowed again and again. 1 was glad to 
have had the opportunity of hearing "Zaza," which 
runs along, as far as plot is concerned, very much as 
the play, with the exception of the finale, and I am 
still more glad of having heard Berlindi sing the title 
role and make such a complete success of it. Her 
voice is rich, strong, fiery and full of abandon. It may 
lack the sweetness of other voices, but it fits in very 
nicely to the music of "Zaza." There is a little laugh- 
ing bit in the first act, which only lasts a second or 
two, which is very captivating, showing her richness 
of tone. Signor Polacco conducted and held his or- 
chestra as one man. We will travel a long way and 
watch many wielders of batons before coming across 

his equal, or, at any rate, his superior. 

* * * 

Will M. Cressy and Blanche Dayne, assisted by 
Mante M. Carter, presented fur their third week an- 
other of Mr. Cressy's episodes, entitled "Bill Biffin's 
Baby." It is. I believe, the first skit Mr. Cressy 
wrote, and it stands very well with tin se "l" the weeks 
previous. It is full of subtle meanings and clever, 
witty sayings. It is to be regretted that there are 
not more Cressys in the world (o delight audiences 
with clean and lovable skits, such as have been pre- 
sented to us these past three weeks. 

The Orpheum bill opens this week with Alcide 
Capitaine, the perfect woman. She is well named, 
being beautifully formed, and her gymnastic perform- 
ance is really marvelous. The four musical Avalos 
were again received very cordial y. as were the Ten 
Nelsons, the great acrobatic family. 

The Carter De Haven Sextette, late of Weber & 
Fields, made their first appearance on Sunday after- 
noon, presenting what the programme stated, a minia- 
ture production entitled "An Easy Angel." Five 
girls and one man, Mr. Carter 1 le I laven. make up the 
cast. The lvrics are by Morris Silver, and the music- 
is by Rose De Haven, one of the five girls. The 
staging of this miniature production is quite effective, 
and the costumes of the girls gorgeous, the color ef- 
fects being acceptable and in good taste. As a thing 
of this kind goes, it is fairly good, but far too drawn 

out. 

* * * 

"A Prisoner of the War." one of Kremer's latest 
melodramas, is to be played at the Central on Mon- 
day, fanuary 30th. It is a sti ry of the Japanese- 
Russian war, and is said to be thrilling. All Kre- 
mer's plays are ultra sensational. 

* * * 

The Alcazar next week will present Pinero's "The 
Gay Lord Quex." The twice-deferred special matinee 
of "Ibsen's Ghosts" will positively occur on Thurs- 
day afternoon, February 9th. It was deferred be- 
cause the illness of Miss Lawrence made it impos- 
sible for her to secure proper rehearsals, But now 
she is, happily, recovered, and her personation of the 
unhappy Mrs. Alving will gain, rather than lose, in 
interest because of the delay. By way of contrast, 
for the week of February 6th comes the wildly humor- 
ous farcicality of "Are You a Mason?" a merry play 
which the Alcazar gives for the first time in stock. 



© 



MRS. SOLLY WALTER 

Consulting House Furnisher and 
Floral Decorator 



1326 POLK ST. 



Tel. Sutter 3241 



January a8, 1905. 



I In veteran actor, J. 1 -t, in the Ian M.i.- 

l.arcii Scotch comedy, The Bonnie Brier Bush," 
with the favorite player, Reuben Fax, will appi 
the Grand Opera House next week. A numbi 
fraternal and patriotic societies will do honor to the 
veteran actor. Tuesday night, the Manchester Unit) 
< >nler of 1 >.M Fellows will attend in a body, and Fri- 
day nin»t. Clan Fraser X.>. 78, Ancient ( hrdcr ol 
tish t una will patronize the performance. < ither 
Scotch societies will be represented at the other per- 
formanci 

* • • 

"Mother Goose," the tir>t of the great English 
Drnry Lane spectacles to be presented in this city, 

will he seen at the Grand 1 Ipera House a week from 
next Monday night, with the original American cast 
and ensemble, which comprises some 350 people. 

The fourth and last week of the enormously sen- 
sational season of grand opera at the Tivoli Opera 
House will begin on Tuesday evening next, the ,}i>l 
inst., with a repetition of the "Faust'' performance. 
( >n Thursday evening. "Lucia" will he given, with 
Tetrazzini as the unhappy bride of Lammermoor, and 
Colli as Edgardo. On Friday evening, "Zaza," in 
which Uerlindi and her associates scored so beauti- 
fully in the performance of last week, will be given, 
and the Saturday matinee will be devoted to " 1'rav- 
iata," with Tetrazzini in the cast and the rest of the 
cast as formerly. Saturday evening there will be a 
second performance of "La Boheme," and on Sunday 
evening the immortal "Faust" will again be billed. 

* * * 

The twelfth annual benefit in aid of the charity fund 
of San Francisco Lodge No. 21, Theatrical Mechani- 
cal Association, will take place at the Alhambra 
Theatre, Friday afternoon, February 17th. The per- 
formances are given to help along the good work of 
the "men behind the scenes." Every theatre in the city 
has promised to contribute the best features from 
their current bill. 

* * * 

The vaudeville performances have been unusually 
good at the Chutes of late, and the programme an- 
nounced for the coming week is very strong. Hyde 
and Heath, renowned and clever young singers and 
comedians, will deliver a "Load of Hay," as they 
designate their novel skit, for the first time in this 
city, and Mr. and Mrs. John T. Chick, who have 
an original and amusing domestic comedietta in "Mat- 
rimonial Mishaps," will also be new. Marie Spar- 
row, a buxom comedienne of the Maggie Cline or- 
der, will make her initial appearance here, and the 
Star Trio, Jennings O'Brien, Horace Mann and Cad 
Franks will continue their hilarious act, "Our Uncle." 

There are also several hold-overs. 

* * * 

The Orpheum announces an extraordinary bill for 
next week. There will be several new specialties. 
Among them will be James F. Macdonald, of "King. 
Dodo" and "Sultan of Sulu" fame. 

* * * 

William Collier will appear at the Columbia Thea- 
tre January 30th, in Richard Harding Davis' farce, 
"The Dictator." Mr. Collier's engagement is for 
two weeks, including Sunday nights and matinees on 
Saturdays. 
(Continued to Page 21.) 

Do Your Eyes Itch and Burn? 

Murine Eye Remedy 1b an Bye Tonic. Cures Sore Eyes. Rests 
Tired Eye». 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Graod Opera house 



On»» BeclonlDc ton "in. » mil 

Klrke La Nh.-lle ni farewell ni-l rm«t 

J II BT0DDABT In 

THE BONNIE BRIER BUSH 
■•■.l by Rauban lax ftrpulai prion 

Hoiiiiar nik-h 

Klaw and ErlnngcrSi mighty baantl -i <■■ iacle 

MOTHER GOOSE 

ready next Tliursdaf nv. ruing. 



UrpheurT). u . t stooktonandTfeweUBta. 
Week commencing Sunday Mutlnee. i 

UNSURPASSABLE FEATURES 
Prosper Troupe; John and Bertha Qloeson and Pred Houlihan- 
.lame.* F. McDonald; Carter De Haven sextette: alelde Canl- 
tiilne: isimiB. Blunaand Binna; The Great Theresea; Orpheum 

Uotlon Pictures and InSI week ot 

CRESSY arjd DAYNE 

Presenting, by universal request. "Town Hall Tonight." 
Matinees e>ery Wednesday. Thuisday. Saturday and Sunday 
Prices 10. 06 and 6oc. 



Columbia Theatre. ° CT1M ' 1 i u ?* * c °- 

-^ w w * Leases and Manager*. 

Two weeks next Monday Jan. 80th. Matinees Saturdays. 
Charles Frohman presents 

WILLIAM COLLIER 

Iu Richard Harding Davie' farce 

THE DICTATOR 

Complete production. Cast of excellence. 

Alcazar Theatre o^SttlS, 

One week commencing Monday January 30 

ltegular matinees Saturday and Sunday 

The Alcazar Stock Company in Pinero's powerful play 

THE GflY LORDQUEX 

Thursday afternoon Feb. 9. 

special matinee. Ibsen's dramatic abnormality 

GHOSTS 

With Harry Mestayer and Lillian Lawrence. 

Monday Feb. 6.— Furiously funny farce "Are You a Mason?" 

Evenings 25c. to 76c. Matinees 26o, to 60c. 



Central ThfiCltrP Belasoo & Mayer, proprietors 
^"oijv.icji ilicuuc. Market St., near 8th. Phone South 533 

Beginning Monday Jan. .0. Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Theodore Kremer's latest and most sensational melodrama 

A PRISONER OF WAR 

Pi ices evening 10c to 60c. Matinees 10c, 15c. 26o. 



Next- 



A FIGHT FOR MILLIONS 



Tivoli Opera House. °° rn8r Ed M L k o n n d stre.u 

GRAND OPERA 

In Italian 

Fourth and last week of the season 

Begins Monday evening, January 30. 

Reserved seats now on sale. Prices, $2, $1.50, fl, 60c. 



flfter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the 
theatre is over. 



NEWTON J. THARP 

ARCHITECT 



131 Post Street. 



an Francisco. 



If vou want your old suit to look like new, send it to 

Spauldlrig Cleaning and Dyeing "Works, 127 Stockton street. 
Careful uressers always do this. Spauldlng's also clean gloves, 
cravats, curtains, laces and all such goods. 



PL.A 

I ^ENl 



YS-PLi 



^AVQ 

■entertainments ■ 4*^3 

Catalog of thousand, sent Free! Free! Free! 
Addriu SAM'L FRENCH, 32 W. 22d St., New York 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 28, 1905. 




Alfred Henry Lewis tells a good story about the 
adventures of George Ade in this city some years 
ago. As Ade is expected to "blow in" again very 
soon, the story comes in good time. Ade crossed the 
continent from Chicago in a special car that carried, 
besides himself, Charley Seymour and a lot of cham- 
pagne. There were other distinguished products of 
Chicago in the car, but when it is said that Seymour 
and a lot of champagne were together, the trip is de- 
scribed. Seymour worked on the local press for a 
short time after that journey. When he came out 
of his dream, he returned to Chicago. Now, Ade has 
a well-established reputation as a driver of a water- 
wagon. It is said he can remain on the seat for a 
dozen laps around: the track without danger of fall- 
ing off — provided Charley Seymour and a punch of 
champagne are not in the fair way. But as to that 
special car affair : When Ade struck the foot of 
Market street, he made fast time to a carriage, and 
hied him to the Palace. Standing on Market street, 
in front of the hotel, he noticed a large crowd in 
front of the Chronicle building. A by-stander told 
him the crowd was watching bulletins of a prize-fight. 
Now let Ade himself tell the tale of woe. He joined 
the crowd. 

"While gazing at the bulletins," he says, describ- 
ing his first night in San Francisco, "the entire Chron- 
icle building darted up the street, sidewise. The 
scenery both sides of the causeway seemed to be 
playing tag. I almost fell on my face. The ground 
seemed to be dancing under me. When I recovered 
the perpendicular, my eyes were filled with tears. 1 
fled for the Palace Hotel. My dreadful misgivings 
touching that unwonted champagne returned, and I 
went to my room. There I cast myself groaning on a 
lounge and summoned a physician. The medicine- 
man went all over me, and at the end, looked baffled. 
'A little feverish,' he said, 'but nothing to count. 
What stampeded you?' I related the upheaval of all 
things earthly in front of the Chronicle. I told him 
how things had gone round and round, and how the 
buildings had chased each other up the street. 

" 'Why,' he exclaimed in disgust, 'you were stand- 
ing on a turn table.' 

"That was all," Ade concludes. "They had merely 
run in a big street car behind me, and were turning 
me around. I was suffering, not from an overdose 
of champagne, but from a sudden attack of turn- 
table." 

* * * 

James Edward Britt, prize-fighter, having become 
an owner of real property by investing some of the 
gold which he purloined from the public, has dis- 
covered that he has a reputation. Pie has therefore 
sued James Coffroth, prize-fight promoter, to obtain 
damages, because the latter advertised that Britt 
would appear in Coffroth's dives as a minstrel. The 
chances are now brilliant that the falling out of Britt 
and Coffroth may lead to revelations as to the man- 
ner in which the prize-fight fakers rob the public. 
Britt, however, should have no difficulty in satisfying 
any court that Coffroth libeled him in saying he was 
a minstrel. A minstrel must have a sense of humor. 
Britt's claim to the possession of a reputation which 
might be injured, and the complacency with which he 
asserts that he should be taken seriously, shows that 
this particular pug is woefully deficient in the quality 
that makes minstrels. The head of James Edward 
is becoming too expansive. 



The nurses at the City and County Hospital had 
what they called a "house warming" last week. The I 
principal entertainer of the evening was Public Ad- ■ 
ministrator Hynes. He is certainly a good business* - 
man. His merry ha! ha! should put all the nurses 
on his staff to drum up cases. 

* * * 

What shall we do with our girls? This athletic fad 
threatens to become serious. Here we read about 
giddy young things on the seamy side of thirty who 
are practicing Japanese wrestling, to the end that 
no man who gets within their grasp shall ever es- 
cape. Then, again, comes accounts of muscular 
women forming clubs for the development of the fe- 
male form divine, and of William Greer Harrison 
passing sleepless nights trying to devise new schemes 
for the benefit of that part of the fair sex that prefers 
Indian-clubs to sofa pillows, and dumb-bells to er- 
mine muffs. I fear me that William Greer will have 
much to answer for, before this present craze sub- 
sides. If an unsuspecting young man loses a rib or 
two while trying the bunny-lnig with one of these 
muscular girls, who will be to blame? The afore- 
said William Greer Harrison. If, during the coming 
summer season, a band of these Harrisonian athletes 
kidnap a few young men and force them to remain for 
a week at a time at the seaside, far from home and 
mother, who will be at fault? The same William 
Greer Harrison. If he would only keep these girls 
of the gymnasium in the ranks of the amateurs, we 
might admire them at a distance, and escape serious 
injury. But you mark this prophecy : Every one of 
those dear young things, as soon as she has developed 
her muscles, will put on her war-paint and go out up- 
on the warpath, looking for scalps. And then, lo, 

the poor Indian ! 

* * * 

The protectors of wild game are going to ridicu- 
lous extremes. An Assemblyman named Branstetter 
— it should be Brainstutters — has introduced a bill, 
making the killing of elk a felony, punishable by im- 
prisonment in State's prison for two years. This is 
an endeavor to return to the conditions of feudal 
times, when the man who killed the king's deer was 
subject to severe punishment. That one who kills a 
wild animals should be therefore adjudged a convict. 




PIERCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO., Inc. 

STOR.AGE. MOVING, PACKING and SHIPPING 

V\ AREHOUSE, EDDY ST., near Fillmore 

Separate built rooms for the Storage of Household Furniture 

Office: Eddy and Fillmore Sts. 'Phone, West X_>8. 



January 28. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'5 



and .•.t.impcd with the *amc infamy that is placed an- 
tra, highwaymen and other criminal-, of high 
rne Mr. Brainstutters should 
up. lie has long a-dreaming in the 

•. where the elk is not the only rare bird. I h< re 
•here, my son. "I met a fool 1' the for 

* * • 

ly, hanker and treasurer of 
the Democratic National Committee, has broken 
down under the strain incidental to the endeavor to 
raise funds \\ith which to settle the accounts of the 
late Democratic party. His physicians have pre- 
scribed for him "complete rest and a change of scene." 
Democrats are taking the same kind of cure. 
Their prescriptions were written on the ballots last 
November. 

* » • 

Senator Perkins has had passed in the Senate a 
hill appropriating §20,000 for the improvement of the 
Presidio Reservation. The bill originally set aside 
>o for the purpose, but the Senate cut off $30,- 
000. In this matter, the Senators displayed the spirit 
of false economy that usually marks appropriations 
for local benefits. They know that the Presidio is 
one of the greatest military reservations in the coun- 
try, and that from a scenic standpoint, it is not sur- 
passed in the world; they know it is in sore need of 
improvements, that new buildings, a sewer system 
and new roads are necessary, and that much remains 
to be done for the benefit of the forest on the hill- 
sides, yet they have cut down the small amount asked, 
$50,000, which was hardly sufficient for the purpose, 
and have given less than half a loaf. The amount ap- 
propriated by the Perkins' bill is not sufficient for 
the purposes intended, and it will have to be supple- 
mented by additional appropriations in the future. 
Meanwhile, as is usual with Federal improvements, 
the work must stop until the money is set aside for 
its development. Uncle Sam attends to his domestic 
economies in a rather slip -shod fashion. 

* * * 

The story comes from Sacramento that Governor 
Pardee is seeking in a diplomatic fashion to obtain 
the resignation of Warden Tompkins, of San Q.uen- 
tin. The Governor knows, of course, that modern 
methods of diplomacy, introduced to the effete coun- 
tries of Europe and Asia by the Roosevelt adminis- 
tration, gives no consideration to circumlocution, but 
advances directly upon its objective, and bears down 
all opposition until it has gained its point. Now, 
Tompkins is like all holders of political snaps, of 
whom it has been said : "Few die and none resign." 
The only way to get him out of San Quentin is to de- 
clare his office vacant. It is possible that he might 
retire if it be shown even to his obtuse intelligence 
that, if he does not, he will be forced out. I advise 
the Governor, therefore, to put the matter so plainly 
and bluntly before Tompkins that he will see the ad- 
vantage of capitulation. That he should remain 
Warden of San Quentin no longer than it may be 
necessary to appoint his successor, is obvious. He 
has so repeatedly displayed his unworth that no in- 
vestigation is necessary to prove his unfitness. 

* * * 

A gentleman named Murat is troubled with a 
young and pretty wife, who permitted herself to be 
inveigled from her home by two young men, Murat 
recovered his wife, and incidentally gave the two 
young men a good beating. They caused his arrest 
for battery. When Police Judge Mogan learned the 
facts, he promptly dismissed Murat, and scored the 
complainants. There is hope for Judge Mogan. 
Evert a Police Judge is sometimes worthy of public 
commendation. . . 



Pears' 

Pears' is essentially 
a toilet soap. A soap 
good for clothes won't 
benefit face and hands. 
Don't use laundry soap 
for toilet or bath. That 
is, if you value clear 
skin. 

Pears' is pure soap 
and matchless for the 
complexion. 

Sold in town *nd village 



The Supervisors might make a few honest dollars 
for the city by charging rent for rooms in the City 
Hall. Among the societies now occupying free quar- 
ters in the Hall are the Mexican Veterans, the Vet- 
eran Policemen, the Grand Army, the Teachers' Club, 
the Teachers' Annuity Association, the Hastings' 
Law College, and last, but most powerful, the re- 
cently organized athletic club for women. Yet, the 
Board of Health complains that it cannot find proper 
accommodations for its rapidly-growing staff. Rooms 
in the City Hall should bring a good rental. 

Oysters are best during the months with an "R" 
in the name, but if you desire a choice steak or shell- 
fish of any kind, go to Moraghan's Oyster Stalls, 
California Market. 



The best materials for tailor-made shirts are used 
by John W. Carmany, Chronicle building. Shirts to 
order is his specialty. 

After the theatre, it is the correct thing to spend an 
hour at Cafe Zinkand, where the choicest of viands 
may be enjoyed while listening to the music of a 
select orchestra. 



Fill up your glasses and drink your fill. A barrel 
of OLD KIRK whisky will never hurt you. 



Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. 

& Co.. 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Cooper 




"-PLUMBING 



Goods 



Our new Show Rooms are open 
to the public. You are invited to 
call and inspect our display of 

MODERN PLUMBING 
FIXTURES 

unequalled on the Pacific Coast. 
GEORGE H. TAT COMPANY 
49-53 First St. San Francisco 

Scad lor Booklet "MODERN BATH ROOMS," 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 28, 1905. 




With so many distinguished visitors tarrying here, 
society is naturally putting its best foot forward, and 
smart entertainments crowd each other. This has 
been one of the busiest weeks on the calendar, teas 
and dinners and dances jostling each other, and every- 
one kept on the jump. Mrs. (Ins Spreckels' illness 
blocked the game a bit, two of the dinners planned in 
her honor being shoved into next week. If things 
keep a-moving at this rate, every one will be taking 
the rest cure by Lent. 

Charlotte Wilson's tea on Saturday afternoon 
brought out all the younger set, with a sprinkling 
of older matrons. Miss Wilson looked unusually 
well, a delicate pink flush for once tinting the pallor 
for which she is famous. A Pierette complexion is 
not a thing of beauty, after all, and it is absurd for 
other girls try to calcimine their roses simply be- 
cause Charlotte Wilson happens to be naturally pale. 
Emily Wilson has more avoirdupois than fashionable 
scales allow, but she is really the beauty of the fam- 

Saturday evening, that "small and early and- select 
affair known as the Saturday evening Cotillion, was 
danced. The girls belonging to this club all joined it 
in their ante-debutante days, and it served as a sort 
of practice affair to polish up their petals for budding 
into society. Lurline Spreckels was one of the origi- 
nal members of the club, and her advent has given 
it a new impetus. Last Saturday's affair went with 
the swing and dash that informality engenders. 

The usual number of informal teas hyphenated 
Sunday. Elsie Sperry dispensed good cheer to a num- 
ber of people, who came for a moment and stayed the 
afternoon — the usual thing in the hospitable Sperry 
home. The Dickens breakfast, given by the Russell 
Cool's, has been fully exploited. I hear this breakfast 
was only an earnest of others to come, and Mrs. Cool 
is developing kinks in her gray matter thinking up 
ideas that will stamp the forthcoming breakfasts 
with the originality that ear-marked this one. 

Mrs. Clement's tea and Mrs. Martin's dinner helped 
drive the blues away from Monday. Tuesday was 
a strenuous day with two bridge parties, a couple 
of teas, Miss Blair's luncheon and the Whittell dance 
in the evening. The luncheon given by Miss Blair 
was planned in honor of Miss Katherine McCann, 
Constance Criminous, and Miss May Deering. the 
three New York girls who have been made the motif 
of so many smart affairs. The Whittell ball was pre- 
ceded by several big dinners, the Whittells themselves 
entertaining a number of the younger set, and Mrs. 
George Pope dining a group of friends, who after- 
wards made merry at the ball. 

Lily Spreckels is being showered with the atten- 
tions that cluster around every popular engaged girl. 
Miss Spreckels has long been an intimate friend of 
Mr. Holbrook's sisters, so she is being ardently wel- 
comed into her fiance's family. Mrs. Silas Palmer 
gave her a luncheon on Thursday, and Jennie Blair 
gives a dinner party to-night in honor of Miss 
Spreckels and Mr. Holbrook. 

Friday there was a crush of fashionables at the St. 
Francis, called forth by Mrs. Cooper's tea. Next week- 
will be another busy one, with the Mayo Newhall and 
Kohl balls, several smart dinner parties and the usual 
batch of teas. 

* * * 

Ethyl Hager's departure for Los Angeles is only 



another proof of that young woman's firm determina- 
tion to shake-a-day-day to society. She has gone out 
but little since her recent return from St. Louis, and 
this last desertion in the very thick of things social 
may be taken as a marker of her feelings. After all, 
Ethyl Hager has led a strenuous, though short, life, 
and it is no wonder her appetite is jaded. It is hard 
to live up to a reputation for eccentric originality, 
and perhaps Miss Ethyl thought it best to honor- 
ably retire. Her half-brother, Frank Hicks, has been 
almost a father to her ever since the death of her 
parents, and she is very devoted to him. The Hicks 
are very prominent in Southland society, so Miss 
Hager will have to exercise all her tact to escape do- 
ing the society act there. 

» * * 

Mrs. Frank Cardan's accident was most unfortu- 
nate, coming as it did at a time when she had ac- 
cepted so many invitations. Mrs. Carolan was to be 
one of the few matrons at the dinner given by the 
V\ li it tells preceding their dance, but her husband had 
In represent the family alone. By the way, there is 
a faint rumor in the air that Mrs. Carolan is con- 
templating a big function, but one never knows 
whether these rumors are started as "tips" to 
hostesses or whether they are founded on bona fide 
reasons. When Mrs. Carolan does entertain, it is on 

a lavish scale that delights the smart set. 
* * * 

The following paragraph, in a society column, must 
have delighted lovers of the sensible life: "Miss Anita 
Meyer, with her sisters, Miss Violet and Miss Vera 
Meyer, expects to leave before long for Europe. The 
young ladies expect to enter a pension in Germany, 
and will study cooking." 

The Myer girls have not yet made their formal de- 
buts, having just left fashionable boarding schools, 
and this culinary finishing school is a new topping off 
for wealthy young girls. But wdiy Germany — land of 
frankfurters and cherry soup? It is to be hoped 
that the pension in which they cast their fate will 
pamper the inner man more than those which I have 
lived in in Germany. Sandwiches from the back- 
bone of meals there, washed down by beer or soup, 
and cold dishes queen it at every fashionable function. 
* * * 

Mr. and .Mrs. S. M. Cohen, of 1246 Waller street, 
have been gladdened by the visit, for two weeks, of 
their daughter. Miss Elizabeth Ellison, who has been 
playing an engagement here with the Blanche Bates 



r HAIR GOODS ^ 

The great range and variety in color and tex- 
ture, eoupled with original design and careful 
workmanship, renders my hair work unsur- 
passed. I can supply anything in hair goods for 
lady or gentleman. WIGS. SWITCHES, TOU- 
"~1!3, PJMF' " 



PEES, 



IPADOURS. 



HAIR DRESSING. HAIR DVINli. and BLEACHING. SHAH' 
P001NG, SCALP TREATMENT. FACE MASSAGE. MANI- 
CURING. OUINTONICA FOR THE HAIR. 



GLEDERER 

123 5TOCKT 



*ER 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 38. 1905. 

nil sunny 

1 the many young California 

n who arc making a name on the stage. She 

company and man- 

nt during the long tour, and will continue 

•hem until the end of the season, when she will 

return to San Francisco for a longer visit with her 

pare' 

» » • 

Arrivals at Hotel Del Monte for the week ending 
January -■-•, 0105: Mr. and Mrs. 11. L. Holland, Chi- 
Fisher, Carlies, Philadelphia; P. B. 
Lawson, Africa; I). Shinnon, India; Mr. and Mrs. I. 
1). Holmes. Pasadena; Dr. and Mrs. \\ . E. Janke, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert lleyman, I.. S. Rahsdall, Mr. 
and Mrs. S. E. Ka'isher. Miss Irma Clayburgh, San 
Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. Alex lllman, New York; 
Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Miseroe, Redlands ; Mr. and Mrs. 
M. Oppenheimer, Spokane; W. J. Connor, James 
Steinhardt, New Y<>rk. 

Arrivals ai Hotel Rafael during week ending Janu- 
ary J4. 1905: Miss Taylor, Miss Sutherland, Mrs. L. 
Berryman, Mr. F. M. Biggerstaff, Mr. N. P. Nye, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. 1). Yerra.'.Mr. J. B. Price, Miss R. 
Warren. Miss A. Head, Mr. C. D. Clark. 

At a magnificent tea giveii by Mrs. L. P. Wiel, 1817 
fackson street. Thursday, 19th inst., Mrs. M. C. SI03S, 
"Mrs. Irvin 1. Wiel. Mrs.' William Gerstle, Mrs. Helen 
lieelu. Mrs. William Fries. Mrs. L. Dreyfus, and Mrs. 
Mark Gerstle, assisted in receiving the guests. Mrs. 
Blanche King Arnold, accompanied by Mr. H. J. 
Stewart, rendered beautiful songs, by Shubert, Shu- 
man and Abt. Mrs. Arnold was in excellent voice, 
and happy in her selections. 



»7 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

January 23 (Monday) — Miss Dolores Wilkins, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Dolores Shaw Wilkins, to Mr. James 
Bartlett Kent. 

January 26 (Thursday) — Mrs. Gertrude McCauley 
to George H. Fields. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 

Miss Grace Hecht, daughter of Colonel and Mrs. M. 
H. Hecht, to John Rothschild. 

ENTERTAINMENTS. 

January 21 (Saturday) — Miss Charlotte Wilson gave 
a tea. The Saturday Evening Cotillion Club 
gave a dance. 

January 22 (Sunday) — Miss Elsie Sperry gave a tea. 
Mrs. Russell Cool gave a "Dickens" breakfast. 

January 23 (Monday) — Mrs. Charles Dougherty and 
Mrs.Jabish Clement gave a tea. Miss Edith Mau 
gave a luncheon. Mrs. Eleanor Martin gave a 
dinner. 

January 24 (Tuesday) — Mrs. A. P. Whittell and Miss 
Florence Whittell gave a ball, preceded by a 
dinner. Miss Jennie Blair gave a luncheon in 
honor of Miss Katherine McCann. 

January 26 (Thursday) — Mrs. Silas Palmer gave a 
luncheon in honor of Miss Lily Spreckels. 

January 27 (Friday) — Mrs. Charles Cooper gave a 
tea at the St. Francis. Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels 
gave a dinner party. 

January 28 (Saturday) — Miss Blair will give a dinner 
in honor of Miss Lily Spreckels and Harry Hol- 
brook. 

January 30 (Monday) — James D. Phelan will give 'a 
dinner in honor of Mrs. Spreckels. Miss Florence 
Cole will give a tea in honor of Miss Constance 
Crimmins and Miss Katherine McCann. Miss 
Alice May will give a luncheon in honor of Miss 
Paula Wolff, Miss Florence Bailey will give a 
luncheon. 




January 31 (Tuesday)— Mrs. Mayo Newhall will give 
a dinner in honor of Miss Charlotte Wilson. Mrs. 

J. 1!. Schroeder will give a luncheon in honor of 

her daughter, Miss Eugenie Hawes. 
February u Wednesday) — Mrs. George H. Mendel! 

will give a bridge party. 
February 2 (Thursday) — Mrs. Clarence Martin Mann 

will give a dinner party. 
February 3 (Friday) — Mrs. Frederick C. Kohl will 

give a dance. 
February 4 (Saturday) — Miss Beatrice Fife will give 

a tea. 



Dentist, 806 Market, 
extracting. 



Dr. Decker 

Specialty "Coiton Ga3" for painless teeth 



Clean carpets are a great source of satisfaction. There's 

only one proper way to have them cleaned, and that's by send- 
ing them to Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Works, 363 Tehama 
street. They will come back looking like new, being thoroughly 
cleaned without any Injury to the fabric. 



The Star Hair Remedy — best of all tonics and restoratives. 

Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not a dye. 
At druggists and hair dressers. Accept no substitute. Star 
Remedy Co., 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 



-Decorations for weddings, Charlotte F. Williams. 231 Post St. 



SANTIAGO ARRILLAGA 

PIANO and HAEMONY 

Tuesdays and Fridays at Studio 

308 POST STREET, Byron Mauzy Piano Warerooms 

Wednesdays at Residence 

5734 TELEGRAPH AVE.. OAKLAND 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 

Lessons in Painting, Drawing, Sketching and Illus- 
trating. Life classes, $3.00 per month. 

927 MARKET STREET 



Dr. H. J. STEWART 



TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Pianoforte. Organ, Harmony and Composition 
Special course for singers desiring church ap- 
pointments. 



STUDIO: 1105 BUSH ST. 



PRIVATE BOARDING SCHOOL AND 

KINDERGARTEN, 

No. 2514 Pine St., near Pierce. 
'Phone Steiner 3171. 

DANCING, FRENCH, DELSARTE. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ffie REFLECTIONS 

OFA Knocker 




/Ry John KendrickJ^angs. 1 

^^^ c °h"g ] t by K+f.+Mmee, iojo4_.. 

THE STAGE. 

"Do you know what I would do if I had Carne- 
gie's money?'' said the Knocker, with a fierce whack 
upon the table that made even the North American 
Review jump up into the air. 

"Yes. You'd probably blow somebody to a box 
of matches or a glass of Vichy," retorted the genial 
Redface. "As I understand it, your seeming tight- 
ness about the pocket is due not to parsimony, but 
to the Absent Treatment to which the Treasury De- 
partment subjects your pocket." 

"Nothing of the sort," said the Knocker. "I don't 

spend my funds blowing you fellows to cocktails 

and cigarettes because I don't see any reason why 

I should. You don't expect me to pay your dues, do 

' you?" 

"No; I don't " 

"Well, then, there is no reason why I should pay 
your house charges either," said the Knocker. "I'm 
not going to get myself posted on the fifteenth just 
to gain a temporary popularity with you genials. But 
if I had Carnegie's money, I'd have some fun with 
certain people in this town that ought to be jacked 
, up with a sudden jerk. I'd devote a couple of mil- 
linns to buying up every seat in every theatre in the 

city for a week " 

"Gee! You must have a high opinion of the cur- 
rent plays," laughed Redface. 

"( )n tlie contrary — they're perfectly rotten," re- 
■ turned the Knocker. "I'd buy those seats just to 
show my contempt for 'em." 

"Bosh, Knocker," said Redface. "The days have 
gone by when a man could pack a theatre with a lot 
of thugs to jeer the stuff he doesn't like off the stage. 
If you've really got a grievance against the theatre, 
■ don't go. Register the protest that goes with that 
silent vote we hear so much about in campaign times 
— the vote that's going to do such terrible things, 
and then goes fishing on election day." 

"You have no imagination, Redface," sneered the 
Knocker. "What good would a band of hissing thugs 
.".do me? My scorn would be shown in a very much 
simpler way, for the moment the tickets were de- 
livered at my house, I'd turn 'em over to my furnace 
man and have him run my fires with 'em for a couple 
, of days. Then every blooming show in the town 
would play to empty houses for a week. That would 
give the managers a jolt — eh?" 

"I don't think so," said Redface. "For, don't you 
see, Knocker, the manager doesn't bother about the 
houses as long as the box office is sold out?" 

"Well; the actors would feel it by jingo," said the 
Knocker, "and so would the fellows that write the 
| plays, and they're the ones I'm after. Actors — 
humph ! I don't believe there are two real actors 
alive to-day. The whole kit and kaboodle of 'em 
are a lot of show-case men and women, pleasant 
enough to look at, but as for acting — great Scott ! 
Why, the stage, instead of being a school of acting, 
has become an Academy of Behavior. Take any one 
of your matinee idols, for instance. Perfectly charm- 
ing gentlemen, from the top of their heads to the tips 



January 28, 1905. 

of their patent leathers, but they are not actors, 
they're Behaviors. You go to see them in one of 
these modern snap-shots of social life that they call 
plays, and what happens? You see a gentleman 
walk in and out of a drawing-room. You see a high- 
ly polished man of the world, who happens to be 
born with all the virtues of mankind, made a monkey 
of by another highly polished man of the world, with 
all the vices and none of the virtues, for two acts, 
and then in the third act the situation is reversed, 
virtue triumphs, and the curtain falls upon the hero 
and heroine sitting down to a cup of tea. 'How many 
lumps, sweetheart?' she says. 'One smile from those 
sweet lips for mine,' says he. Down comes the cur- 
tain, and the audience, thrilled with the power of 
the situation, gasps: 'Great! Charming! The real 
thing at last!' And then goes home and plays tid- 
dledywinks until matinee day comes around again. 
The men and women who do these stunts become the 
great actors of the time, and the drama that was once 
full of vitriol, of sparkle, of spirit and action becomes 
as inspiring as a glass of milk, and as potent to stir 
the soul as a pint of pink lemonade. The educational 
value of the drama of the hour is along the lines laid 
down by the books on etiquette, and the Ladies Fire- 
side Companion. It teaches men what buttons to 
button on their dress waistcoats, and how they shake 
hands in polite society. It teaches the women the 
latest wrinkles in gowns, how to sit down in a draw- 
ing room, and how to evince deep emotion over the 
tragic complications of a five o'clock tea without 
showing it. But of the old-time thing where passion 
was not chilled by politeness, where it was the heart 
and not the dressmaker that was the central theme 
of the story; of the good old days when actors threw 
each other over the footlights head first into the bass 
drum, and where villains were pushed off precipices 
or sent skating down Xiagara Falls as the penalty of 
their villainy, nothing remains — those days are gone. 
Sock and buskin have given place to silken open- 
work hose and peek-a-boo shirt waists. Cayenne pep- 
per has departed that the soda-mint drop may come 
into its own. Why, even the glories of the voice that 
once sounded the depths of our souls have departed 
from our Thespians. In place of the resonant thun- 
der of a Forest's voice, we have the tinkle-tinkle of 
a simpering Favershack. The gurgle of a Barrett, 
that used to make us wonder whether he gargled his 
throat with a mixture of gravel and carpet tacks, has 
given place to the soft, lady-like tenor squeak of a 
Kakersham, and the vocal notes of a Booth, that used 
to reach from the sub-cellars of the playhouse to the 
rafters of Heaven, have yielded place to the canary- 
like pipings of the matinee idol of the hour. I heard 



BOORD'S 

OLD TOM. DRY 
®. SLOE GINS 

ORANGE BITTERS, etc. 




CAT AND BARREL 
BRAN > 

BOORD & SO 
LONDON, ENG. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO.. 

Bole Aeents 814 Sacramento St S. F. 



January a8. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

■Hough .>ncc in i play called "Virginias," 
word that when the old man 
• tiller ti|> and 1 II Mr. George W. Ap 

hat he tl hint and his tlirta 

iln't known what was going >>n. 

have thought a tir-t ei.< ht had broken 

out somewhere, ["hose fell vocal ava 

Unches, ami when they stabbed each other on the 

it didn't remind yon of a o»>k putting chicken 

h\er- on a skewer, or a xylophone player tapping 

another fellow's ribs with a flat stick, but it was .1 

•ah. and if yon didn't see the dagger sticking 

out of tlu- other side of the stabbee, you thought you 

did, an\ how." 

"Well. I j;uess you're right there." said Redface. 
■'The modern drama isn't as much of a riot as the old 
drama used to he. hut I must say I think the new 
style is more refined." 

"Tush I" said the Knocker. "More refined ! What 
refinement is there in a modern comedy in which 
your heroine pursues another woman's husband, or 
your hero spends his time for five epigrammatic acts 
trying to induce another man's wife to elope with him 
and dwell in a corner lot in Arcady. swept by ocean 
breezes, on the installment plan? I don't see it. 
Just because your villain goes about looking like a 
howling swell in the latest cut of evening clothes, 
and your heroine is the swaggerest looking thing 
that ever came out of Mrs. ( Isborne's gown factory, 
you call it more refined. Vice in modern clothes and 
full of etiquette is just as offensive as it is in top- 
boots, velvet robes and knee-breeches, and for my 
part. I like the latter far better. The swashbuckling 
bravado has at least the courage of his vices, which 
your latter-day namby-pamby wdiite-shirted sepul 
chre lacks, with his sneaking ways and 400 front." 

"Well, anyhow," said Redface, "you can't stop 
these things by buying up all the seats in the theatres 
and leaving them empty. If things are as bad as you 
say they are, let the people go to see them and get 
disgusted with them. That's the way. Buy the seats 
and give 'em away to people who will evince their 
displeasure in a material way — that's the proper 
method." 

"H'm — well, maybe," said the Knocker. "Either 
that or devote the money to providing the audience 
with disinfectants to be passed by the water boy, eh ?" 

"That's a bully idea," laughed old Redface. "Why 
don't you?" 

"Because," said the Knocker, "I haven't got Car- 
negie's money yet, and I'm afraid I'm not likely to 
get it, the way the financial current is setting. You 
couldn't lend me seven dollars, could you, Redface?" 

"What would you do with it?" asked the other. 

"I'd begin on my first plan," said the Knocker. 
"I'd buy four seats for 'Letty of the Garbage Patch' 
to-night, and then stay home all evening. We could 
get an idea of how the scheme would work." 

"No," said Redface, "I can't let you have seven dol- 
lars. I've only got four, and I owe twenty-five of 
that already." 

The Youngest Baby 

can readily digest and assimilate Borden's Eagle Brand Con- 
densed Milk because the casein, which is in ordinary cow's milk, 
undergoes physical alteration in the process of condensation, 
which makes it digestible. It brings the result which every par- 
ent is looking for, viz., strong and healthy children. 



NEWS LETTER. 



:9 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 
for J7.60 per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton 12. Use Briquettes for 
cooking and heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 30 California street, San 

Francisco, deals In all kinds of newspaper Information, business, 
personal, political, from press of State, coast afPJ country. Tel. 
Main 1041. 



Ruinart 




The champagne 
o< perfection. 
Essential to the 
enjoymenf oP 
any function 

MDRCANTILL© 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 




VWG 
5 



iajkill.SpecialArf? 
an Franc/iaco. * 



"BABJ" 



EPICURIAN RESTAURANT 

323 LA-RKIJV STREET 



73he James H. Babcock Catering Co. 

409 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 




A CLEAN 

RESTFUL 

JOURNEY 

Is the kind you will 
make on the famous 



GOLDEN STATE 
LIMITED 



A new and attractive route through the en- 
chantment of the Southwest, giving daily 
service without change from San Francisco 
and Los Angeles to Chicago via El Paso and 
Kansas City. Tourist cars, standard sleepers, 
up-to-date throughout. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC and 
ROCK ISLAND SYSTEM 






BUSWELL COMPANY 



638 Clay Street 



Bookbinder, Paper-rulnr. Printer and Blank 
Book Manufacturer 



20 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

THE MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE. 

The formal opening of the Merchants' Exchange 
Building was the occasion for great congratulation 

among the members and 
by the business commun- 
ity. The beautiful build- 
ing is perfect in all its 
appointments, and will 
serve to house the Ex- 
change until the end of 
time. The formal open- 
ing was a dedication by 
procession and brass 
band and much speechi- 
f\ ing. John P. Irish, al- 
though suffering from a 
cold or other ailment 
that seemed to prevent a 
long address, gave one of 
his masterful and charac- 
teristic outbursts of hot 
air in his usual markedly eloquent style. It was an 
occasion when the use of hot air is permissable, and 
indeed almost obligatory, and the Colonel's state- 
ments of the usefulness of the Merchants' Exchange 
as an association of Builders of Empire and Cap- 
tains of Industry, were particularly fitting. InciiUn- 
tally, the Colonel put in a plea for Japan as against 
Russia, and for the inviolability of Chinese territory. 
Colonel Irish was followed by other able speakers, 
and the occasion was made memorable by the serving 
of a light collation. Long live the Merchants' Ex- 
change, and may its sphere of usefulness continually 
increase. 



January 28, 1905. 





a good 
glove 

for a. 

dollarand a half 



Centemeri 



W 109 Grant Ave.BetGeary&tetSts. 



BEKINS PacKing, Moving and Storing of Household Goods 



We Babcock, President. 




The case of ex- Police Commissioner Hutton has 
called forth an exhibition of our delectable Mayor's 
brute nature. In the matter of veracity, as regards 
the parties to the controversy, we are told there is 
little choice. We have here the case of a young wo- 
man publicly imolated to satisfy the political vanity 
of two men. We doubt very much whether the entire 
United States will produce another Mayor who pub- 
licly brands a young woman, a citizen of his own city, 
as a courtesan, without giving her a single chance to 
obtain redress or rehabilitation. It is another case of 
the risen creature of the slums returning to his origi- 
nal muck. 

The Pacific Coast Casualty Co. declared a quarterly 
dividend on the 18th hist., "at the rate of 6 per cent 
per annum. The company is at present in a flourish- 
ing condition, and these quarterly dividends will be 
paid regularly. Mr. E. F. Green, manager of the 
company, deserves the congratulations and thanks jf 
the stock-holders for the manner in which he has 
brought this popular company to the front. 

The Loring Club now announces the second con- 
cert of its twenty-eighth season for the evening of 
Tuesday, January 31st, at the Native Sons' Hall. 
This is the first concert of the club since the death of 
its founder and late director, Mr. David W. Loring. 
The pieces to be rendered by the club include some 
compositions for male voices rarely heard, such as the 
excerpt from Max Bruch's clever opera, "The Lo- 
reli," (the bass solo in which will be sung by Mr, 
Gustav Brenner), and Liebe's "After the Battle," in 
which the composer has most skillfully introduced 
the old German choral, "Nun danket alle Gott." This 
concert will be under the direction of Mr. W. C. 
Stadfeldt, and Mr. Fred Maurer, Jr., will be the 
pianist. 



Shipping at cut rates to and from all points in our 
own private car. 

Main Office 11 MONTGOMERY ST.. S.n Francisco 

PHONE MAIN 1840 

OaklandOfflce: ion Broadway Los Anneles Offifc: -2U 8 Broadway 



THE REASON WHY 



So many San Francisco houses ad- 
vertise in the 



Oakland Tribune 



is because it reaches thousands of fam- 
ilies who depend entirely upon THE 
TRIBUNE for all the news of the 
day. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASERS' GUIDE 



BERGEZ RESTAURANT— Rooms for ladles and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

POODLE DOG RESTAURANT— N. E. Cor. Eddy and Mason streets. 
Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone Private Exchange i'29 
A. B. Blanco, Proprietor. 

NOTARr PUBLIC. 

MARTIN ARONSOHN. Notary Public and Pension Attor- 
ney. Office, 632 Market street, room 8, (opp. Palace Hotel) San 
Francisco. Tel. Black 6541. Lroans on any security at lowest 

terms; no commissions. 



BOILER MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 318, 318 Main 
street. Iron work of every description designed and constructed. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. ~~ 

Phoenix Savings, B. & L. Association. 

For the sit months ending December 3o, 1904. dividends have been 
declared as follows: On Participating Stock at the rate of per cent 
per annum ; on Term Certificates at the rate of 6 per cent per annum : 
on Ordinary Savings Accounts at the rate ik per cent per annum, free 
of taxes and payable on find after January •!(>, ioo5. The riiocnix haw a 
guarantee capital of *200.i Miami a total paid-in capital of si.f.ro.onn. Its 
board of directors are: A. A. Wat kins, president ; Charles R- Bishop 
vice-present; S- Prentiss Smith, treasurer: George C. Bnardman, 
director; Gavin McNab. director: Charles E. Ladd. director. 

CLARENCE GRANGE., Secretary and Managing Director. 



January 28. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Pleasure's Wand 



(Continued from Page 13.) 

The Associated Wives and Daughters of the Mexi- 
can Wai Veterans are to be benefited by a stereopti- 
given at the Academy <>f Sciences 
■ •n February ad, at 8 p. m. The subject' will be "The 

I the Portland Through the Antic & 
Mr. I. Homer Fritch is the able lecturer, and lie was 
a passenger on the steamer when she made that 
memorable trip. No other explorer has ever been >■• 
far North at that season of the vear. and he took most 
valuable photographs in the Land of the Midnight 
Sun. The admission is twenty-five cents, and the 
tickets are to be procured at Sherman & Clay's Music 
Store, at the corner of Sutter and Kearny streets. 
* * * 

The Alcazar Company already ranks as the finest 
stock organization in America, but Belasco, Mayer 
and Price are ever seeking to improve it. John Da- 
vies, a character actor of distinction, is coming from 
the < >deon, St. Louis, to replace George Osbourne, 
now touring Europe. Laura Adams and Christie 
MacLean, who do excellent character work, are per- 
manently engaged. Mary Young, who sang and 
danced so delightfully in "The Messenger Boy," and 
other Tivoli productions, is to join the Alcazar forces 
in a fortnight. 

* * * 

"< )ld Heidelberg" has broken the Los Angeles 
stock record by running two weeks, and turning away 
people ever since the first night, at the Belasco 
Theatre. The acting and staging rival the Alcazar 
production. 

* * * 

The benefit performance to be given by the Ala- 
meda Lustpiel Ensembles, at the Columbia Theatre, 
on the afternoon of Sunday, February 5th, promises 
to be well attended. The affair is being given in aid 
of the old-time German actress, Mrs. Josephine La 
Fontaine. The company will appear in the Kadel- 
burg and Blumenthal comedy, "Grossstadtluft," 
which was so well received when recently staged by 
the same players. 

* * * 

Madam Melba's concerts at the Alhambra will be 
given February 7th and 10th. At the first concert, 
Mme. Melba is to sing the famous "Mad Scene" from 
Donizetti's "Lucia," the Serenata, with harp ac- 
companiment, by Tosti, and the brilliant vocal waltz 
"Se saran Rose," by Arditi. The programme will in- 
troduce Signorina Sassoli, the young Italian harpist ; 
Mr. Ellison Van Hoose, tenor ; M. Charles Gilibert, 
baritone; Miss Llewela Davies, pianist; and Mr. C. K. 
North, flute soloist, in well selected numbers. Seats 
for both concerts go on sale at the Sherman, Clay 
& Co.'s music store on Thursday morning, February 
2d. The prices are to be $4, $3, $2 and $1. 

* * * 

The first visit of the Savage English Grand Opera 
Company will be due at the Columbia Theatre the 
latter part of February. There are a hundred and 
fifty people in the company, and it requires fourteen 
cars to transport them and the immense productions. 
The season lasts for thirty-five weeks, during which 
time they will play in sixty-seven cities, traveling 
ten thousand miles. "Parsifal" is included in the rep- 
ertoire. 



PEN CO 

Good Writing 



i-*iwru <i* thine. gooifnk u another: and Dm penmanship 1. 

•till another hut all nfHMM *.. fOT uinhi WlUl 

Spencerian Pens 

DeyaretbeoaeneMBBaryartlole top nti>li-i> k.>. .1 reaalti In 

writing Bran Variety at all BtatlOn.rt Samples l..r trlnl. a 
ilifTorent numbers fnr»".c In stamps 

SPENCERIAN PEN CO., 349 Broadway, NEW YOMt 



A REWARD OF $1,000 

will ho paid for a cage of 

WRINKLES. FRECKLES, BIRTH MARKS. 
MOLES, MOTH PATCHES. SMALLPOX PIT. 
TINOS. PIMPLES, TAN. SUNBURN. ACNE. 
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR, PORT WINE MARKS 

and all Facial Blemishes that I 
accept for treatment and fail to 
cure : : : : 

YOU CAN BE BEAUTIFUL 
DR. W. C. SCHLEY. Dermatologist 
School. 141 Powell St. S. F. Store. 229 Powell Sli 




BLAKE, MOFFITT S TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland Oregon. 
TEL. MAIN 199. 65-57-59-61- FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses 
Rpncnac ,aundrle9 ' paper-hangers, printers, painters 
DI UallCsh'lliard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy- 
makers, canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 

Buchanan Brothers 
Brush Mits., 609 Sacramento St., S. F., Tel. Main 5611 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and commission merchants. 
General agent, 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

Gillingham Cement 

MarKet Street, cor. Fremont 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

428 Post street, between Powell and Mason 
San Francisco. Tel. Main 1323. 

E. BBIDGE, Proprietor. 




When busy and tired from much overwork, 
You'll find a reviver in famous OLD KIRK, 



Phone Folsom 3102 Res. Phone Ohurch 2616 

R. W. McDANIEL 
Patent Chimney 

CHIMNEY TOPS. SMOKE Y CHIMNEYS CURED 
1719 MARKET STREET. S. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 28, 1905. 



The 1905 

Sidi Entrance 16 Horse Power Double Cylinder Touring Car 



Has Arrived 



Call and see it. 



Rambler Automobile Agency. I33 C ^ , K. ST 

Phone South 1007 



BEFORE PURCHASING 1905 MODEL AUTOMOBILE SEE THE 

PUNGS- 
FINCH 

4 Cylinder $1,800 

Touring Car 
B. B.STANLEY. Aet. 

Sales Rooms- 596 GOLDEN 
GATE AVE.. S P. 





Type VIII. 30-38 h. p. 1905 Pope Toledo. Demonstrating oar has 
arrived. Carguaranteed to <*arry 6people on road, a mile a minuet 

POPE TOLEDO TOURING CAR CO. 

G. A. BOYER, Manager 

134-148 GOLDEN GATE AVE., S. F. PHONE SOUTH 1142 



15he CADILLAC 




Cid'llac woo 10 Trophies 
si the Del ttonte meet. 

Price $950 

With Tonneau $1050 

Canopy top extra 
August 10, 1904 Cadil- 
lac officially first to 
finish in the New 
York and St. Louis 
run. Roads nearly 
Impassable. 

CUYLER LEE, Aft. 

359-363 uOLDEN GATE 
AVE.. S. P. 



£> AUTOMOBILE SPECIALTIES j& 

Geo. P. Moore CB. Co. 
323 VAN NESS AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 




During the fifth annual automobile show in .Madi- 
son Square Garden, New York, last week, the public 
had an opportunity of judging whether the automo- 
bile had been perfected or not. More than two hun- 
dred machines were on view, furnishing a more be- 
wildering variety than ever before in the history of 
the industry. Experts claim that the automobile is 
not perfect this year, and that it will not be perfect 
five years from now, because improvements are be- 
ing made every day. They will tell you, however, 
that the automobile has reached a standard design, 
and further development will be in perfection of de- 
tail. 

In past years, each successive model made the 
others look like a last year's hat, but now that the 
standard design, with the engine under a bonnet in 
front has been universally adopted, it only remains 
for a buyer to select his style of car. 

When one considers the tremendous tests to which 
motor cars are put, it must be admitted that they 
represent the highest type of mechanical construc 7 
tion. Miles at railroad speed over rough roads do 
not disarrange the mechanism in any way, while the 
same treatment to a locomotive or any other vehi- 
cle would bring about a wreck. 

* * * 

"Motor Age," in its New York show number, 
says: "Little old United States is it. American mak- 
ers have scored a triumph. \ r ankee-built automo- 
biles have come up from the ruck, and are running 
neck and neck with last year's acknowledged leaders. 
In this long-to-be-remembercd year of our Lord 
1905, good old Uncle Sam has come into his own as 
one of the leaders of the world in the newest me- 
chanical industry. Serious trade opposition on this 
side of the ocean by motor cars from the other is 
now a joke. Foreign and domestic motor vehicle pro- 
ducts have been matched side by side in the metropo- 
lis in two rival shows. Uncle Sam has placed his 
hand on the shoulder of the American maker and 

said: "He's good enough for me." 

* * * 

San Jose automobilists are increasing in numbers,- 
and that they are enthusiastic goes without saying. 
The appearance recently on the streets of the Garden 
City of several big four-cylinder choo-choo wagons 
indicates that San Jose will be represented by the 
highest class of automobiles in the country this- 
season. Dr. Benepe, A. H. Marten and C. H. Mac 
Rride have all gone in for motoring quite strenu- 
ously. Thirty non-owners, but enthusiasts, have 
joined the Automobile Club of California in the past 
ten days, from Santa Clara County, and a number of'' 
these will attend the auto feast planned by the club, 

to be held in February. 

* * * 

One of the French automobile journals has offered 
a prize of $20,000 to the manufacturer of the car that 
wins the international race, to be held in France 
next year, under the auspices of the Automobile 
Club of France. There may be makers who will he 
inclined to think that they would rather win this 
race than the Gordon Bennett contest. 

Most of the French makers are not inclined to en- 
ter cars for the eliminating race of the Bennett cup. 
on account of the entrance fee, which amounts to 



January a8. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

rhc three machines 11 a maker enters hi- 
luj claim i! - nail 

build 1 li • 1 otherwise pi 

mil that in entrance fee <<i $1,000 .1 car 
be plentiful. It is !■• bi 1 to the sp 

that it reconsiders it^ decision about the 
■ I make it such an amount a> will 
the mak< • 

• « • 

■ilar interest in the big cars at the New i 
show centered in the new 4<> horse-power Columbia 
touring car, which scored such a wonderful record 

self last year. < Ine of its most noteworthy per- 
formances was establishing the record between Chi- 

uiil New York, ami licre in the West, also, it 

.lined fame by the remarkable test <.f its 500 
mile trip overland from San Francisco to Tonopah. 
( Ine of these Columbia four-cylinder cars is en route 

•1 Francisco, and local enthusiasts are awaiting 
it> arrival with keen interest. A prominent owner of 
one of these cars in this city returned this Week 
from the Xew York show, and stated that of the big 
cars at the annual exhibit, the Columbia attracted the 
most attention. 



NEWS LETTER. 



*3 




1'Uiiohilcs will In 1. 

\\ ill Midi 
ccm, which u.. 

automobile held last year. I 
ton, manager, has hem Bast attending 

in New Yurk. 

• » * 

News comes from the mining district in Nevada 
that the four-cylinder Columbia broke Hi. record 

last week between Tonopah and Goldfield, 

this distance of heart] 30 miles in one hour anil 

twenty-three minutes. Pretty g 1 time for a ho 

less carriage over these rock) mountain roads. 

Ilerr Schiller Steinwartz, secretary of the Germany 
embassy, in a speech on the opening night of the 

Importers' Show in Xew York last week, said: A es, 
gasoline is thicker than water, and one of the most 
valued attributes of the automobile is. that it makes 
for peace and everything that contributes to pcaee- 
ful conditions in a part of the soul of progress. The 
automobile industry is one of the great things of the 
world, and this assemblage of cars from the 
leading nations of Europe is a 
splendid illustration of what we 
all hope for — perpetual peace 
among the nations of the earth." 

Any one who doubts as to the 
"arrival" of automobiling as a 
sport, must now be set at rest, for 
three members of the Metropoli- 
tan Turf Association are in at- 
tendance at Ormonde making 
books upon the big Florida races. 
Charley Heineman, Flenry Ste- 
deker and Leo Swatts are the trio, 
and they put up their slates and 
make a book on each race in 
regular turf style. It now only re- 
mains for some one to get out a 
form chart and a set of tips on the 
winners. 



&/>e STARS of the SHOW 

Again the Ford Cars held the "center of the stage" at the New York show. Exper- 
ienced motorists were enthusiastic in praise of Henry Ford's advanced ideas and the 
universal query" what has Ford this year" emphasized the fact that' the Automobile 
world looks to Henry Ford for the ultimate perfection of motor driven vehicles. 

For 1905 we have the Fobd Model " B " 
with a four-cylinder (verticle ) engine, eitrp 
long wheel base, aide entrance tonneau, d'.- 
rect drive, and an absolutely new and orig- 
inal idea in driving construction. Weight 
is 1700 lbs., and as the engine develops more 
than 20 H. P., it gives the car morn power for 
Its weight than any Automobile of similiar 
type. The Ford driviDg frame is such an 
evident advance in construction that every- 
one interested ought to have our new cata- 
logue describing this wonderful Ford inven- 
tion. Price of Model "B" $2000. 

Ford Model B, Price $2000 

The Foed Model " C " has a 10 H. P., 
double opposed motor with the euccessful 
Ford planetary transmission, a lengthened 
wheel base and perfect distribution of 
weight, making it the most practical col- 
on the market for business or professioi-al 
men or for ordinary family use. The price 
of Model "0" is $950, with detachable ton- 
neau, so the car can be used as a runabout 
if desired- Economy of maintenance, 
always a feature of the Ford ears, is further 
guaranteed in the 1905 Models, hy li^ht. 
strong construction and mechanical sim- 
plicity and excellence. 
Catalogue sent on request- 





Ford Model 0. Price $950 

FORD MOTOR CO. 



Detroit, MicH. 



Canadian Trade supplied by Ford Mjtor Co. of Canada, Ltd., Walk, vllte, 0n(. 



Good automobilists, as well as 
bad, have to carry their license 
numbers prominently displayed 
on their vehicles, according to the 
law, so that when the drivers ex- 
ceed the speed limit the police- 
man, if they cannot catch the of- 
fender, can see the number and lo- 
cate the owners of the vehicles. 
One of the new ideas to aid the 
policeman in doing all this is to 
wipe the number plate with a 
piece of oil-waste, whereupon it 
is not long before the dust is so 
thick on the oily plate that it is 
impossible to read the number. 
* * * 

Leslie Smith, manager of the 
branch of a prominent local firm 
at Armona, uses an automobile in 
his business, which consists chief- 
ly in calling to the different 
ranches, and he certainly puts his 
motor car to some hard usage in 
traveling over the plowed ground 
— sometimes of orchards and vin? 
yards. Mr. Smith was in this city 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 28, 1905. 



73 SETS OF 



Diamond 




DETACHABLE CLINCHER WRAPPED 
TREAD CONSTRUCTION TIRES ON 
CARS EXHIBITED AT THE NEW YORK 
SHOW. :::::: 

More than twice as many as the next highest make. 
Far more than any other two makes combined. 

Because: "They are made so good that there will 
be no occasion to take them off." 

The Diamond Rubber Co. Akron, Ohio. 

First manufacturers of automobile tires in America- 
SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH-608 MISSION STREET. 
DENVER AGENCY-1735 AIRPAHOE STREET. 

Our "Tire Users Book of Instructions" now ready. Youtb for the 
asking. 



ARRIVED 




The Car all America is Talking About 

WE INVITE YOU TO CALL 
AND SEE IT. 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 

901-925 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



Agents: WINTON. OLDSMOBILE and STEVENS-DC IfYEA 
Oakland Agency- 355 loth Street. 



last week, and after looking over the new models, 
he took away with him an Oldsmobile runabout of 
the French type. 

Among the cars to try for high honors in the one 
hundred mile road race in Cuba next month will be 
the two White steamers, which were originally in- 
tended for competition in the Vanderbilt cup race, 
but were not completed in time. These steamers will 
be pitted against the speediest of the gasoline cars, 
and the result of the two powers will be watched with 
unusual interest by automobile men. 

* * * 

This is the time of the year when the new models 
are arriving in this city, and interest is keen when- 
ever one of the 05 cars arrive. The model "C" Win- 
ton touring car reached here Monday afternoon, and 
it was not long before rumor spread about town that 
the latest of Alexander Winton's products had ar- 
rived. Chauffeurs and owners alike nocked to the 
Pioneer garage to get a peep at the new Winton, and 
I was surprised to see the great amount of interest 
taken. The new car is a very handsome and roomy 
machine, and what at once is most noticeable is its 
complete accessibility, as well as simplicity. 

* * * 

C. B. Smith, of Seattle, accompanied by several of 
his friends, left this city a few days ago in his Win- 
ton touring car for Los Angeles, going overland all 
the way by the auto route via Del Monte and Santa 
Barbara. The northern motorist is not out for a 
record, and will travel leisurely toward the southern 
metropolis. 

* * * 

Senator Felton is another prominent San Francis- 
can who, during a trip East recently, was introduced 
to the horseless carriage, and while on the ground 
where the American manufacturers construct their 
sturdy motor cars, decided to determine on the car 
he would enjoy this season's motoring in. After con- 
siderable time spent acquainting himself with the 
various types of chug-wagons, he chose the four- 
cylinder car which the Autocar Co., of Ardmore, 
Pennsylvania, has launched this year, and Senator 
Felton is of the opinion that he will motor this season 
in one of the smartest autos in San Francisco. 

One of the Eastern journals recently remarked, 
about this new car: "So far as appearance goes, the 
expectation of an exceptionally fine creation has been 
quite fulfilled, owing to the reputation of the Penn- 
sylvania concern for clever designs and sound and 
ingenious construction. The mechanical excellence 
of the car becomes apparent as it is examined in de- 
tail." 

* * * 

Among the prominent women of San Francisco 
who will pilot big autos this season without the as- 
sistance of a chauffeur will be Mrs. J. A. Marsh. This 
expert chauffeuse, one of the most enthusiastic over 
motoring on the coast, is awaiting anxiously the ar- 
rival of her new Pierce-Arrow, which machine will 
develop thirty horse-power. 

* * * 

That the automobile industry has grown to im- 
mense proportions no one can doubt. Just one con- 
cern, the Pope Motor Car Co., will produce the largest 
output of high-class cars this season, which will to- 
tal nearly four million dollars. 

The Pope Motor Car Co. wired their local agents, 
the Pope-Toledo Touring Car Co., at the close of the 
show, that the business at the annual exhibition of 
chug-wagons in New York was phenomenal, and that 
their entire product for 1905 has been contracted for. 



January 28, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



■<5 



Ids, are now in transit. 
and : have 

(hem on exhibition during the first week in Febru- 



Lte, will travel about 
this season in a side-entrance Packard. Mr. Green 
attended the Now York .-how last week, and after in- 
i^ating the merits of the different cars and the 
Packard, the latter created such a favorable imprea 
sion on him that a telegram to the Pacific Motor Car 

if San Francisco, ordering them to hook him for 
a side entrance car in February, was the result. 

• * » 

The Diamond Rubber Company has issued a neat 
little booklet, entitled "The Diamond Book of In- 
struction anil Catalogue of Automobile Tires." The 
Diamond Rubber Company mule the first pneumatic 

motor tire- produced in America, and say in the intro- 
ductory of their latest book: "If you concede that ex- 
perience is the greatest known instructor and the 
most fruitful source of all practical knowledge, you 
wfll admit that we are in a position to give instruc- 
tion." 

* * * 

The Pope-Toledo again distinguished itself for 
speed, at < >rmonde Beach, a regular stock 30 h. p. 
touring car doing 5 miles in 5.13 2-5, defeating all 
competition in touring car class. The "Thomas'' 40 
h. p. was over one-half mile behind at the finish. 



A Japanese, a Chinaman, a Puritan and a Jew prac- 
ticing Christian Science in concert is a funny sight, 
but it may lie seen right here in San Francisco. 



Wedding Invitations. 

We give special attention to prevailing forms, and 
engrave visiting cards, wedding initations and an- 
nouncements, correctly and reasonably. Monograms, 
crests and address dies made to order. C. E. Gold- 
smith, the engraver, is now with us, which insures 
a continuance of the very best work that the en- 
graver's art can produce. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 
Market street. 



Gas Bills Reduced. 
By making a small monthly charge for the use of 
our Regulator, we reduce your bills and keep your 
tips, burners and lights in good condition. Gas Con- 
sumers' Association, 455 Sutter street. 'Phone Main 
717. 



To lease for six months (possibly sell) finest 
twelve-room corner residence; best location, Ala- 
meda. Every modern convenience ; street cars pass 
door ; railroad stations near ; satisfactory terms to 
responsible party. Address C. B. Warrand, Post 
Office, Alameda. 



Techau Tavern is recognized as a refined and quiet 
place for refreshment after the theatre. The best of 
wines and table delicacies are served. A well-organ- 
izd orchestra is in attendance. 



There are a number of Japanese stores, so-called, 
in San Francisco, but if you wish the real article, it is 
better to patronize George T. Marsh & Co., who 
makes a specialty of Japanese art goods. 

Eyes Irritated by Wind 

Mineral laden poisonous dust, and strong sunlight, need care. 
Murine Eye Remedy soothes Eye pain and cures Inflammation. 
Redness, Itching, Granulated and Weak Eyes. Murine Is an 
Ey« Tonic; an aid to those wearing glasses. 



For your protection rrnwmlm thai 
every bottle oi the prnuinc 

Vve. CLICQUOT 

CHAMPAGNE 

imported direct from France bean the 
additional label 




A-VIGNIERG>- 



SOLE AGENTS TOR THE PACIFIC COAST 



ThU incomparable French Champagne 
is especially prepared to suit the tasle 
of the American market. 

Refuse Substitutes 



Autocar 

Four-Cylinder 



Double Side Entrance 
Vertical Motor— w-an H. P. 
Speed 40 to 46 Miles Per 
Hour. Superior Climber 
on any Hill : : : 




$2,150 








The reputation of the Autocar Company for clever designs and 
sound and ingenious construction is such that an exceptionally 
flne creation was confidently expected in the new four-cylinder 
car and the accompanying: illustration makes it clear that so far 
as appearance goes this expectation has been fulfilled. The me- 
chanical excellence of the car becomes apparent as it is examined 
in detail and we are assured that their eight years' experience 
enabled the Autocar Company to produce a four-cylinder ear that 
cannot be surpassed by any automobile at any price. 



MIDDLETON 

606 Van Ness Ave., S. F. 



MOTOR-CAR CO. 

1 16-1 18 E. Third St., Los Angeles 



PIERCE ARROW 




lfloe Model, so h. p. Oast Aluminum body. Will arrive Feb. 5th 
SEE IT 

MO'BILE CA'R'RI AGE CO. 

GOLDEN GATE AVE. and GOVGH ST. S. F. 



PBOMPT SERVICE 

Cttttttrrr Iforinc (Uompattg 

Supply Electric Batteries for Automobiles. 

Best Repair Shop in Town. Electrical Supplies, Machinery. 

House Wiring and Repairing. 

No. 28 SECOND ST. TJnder Grand Hotel. TEL. BVSH 352 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 28, 1905. 




The News Letter's insurance department has con- 
sistently, for some months past, been advocating the 
absolute need in the State of California of a State 
Fire Marshal. 

In its efforts to introduce before the Legislature 
this bill, it has been met with a quasi endorsement 
of most of the members of the Legislature who, by 
their attitude, express their ideas of the necessity of 
a law which will enable a State official to punish the 
guilty. 

The News Letter, in its efforts to better the exist- 
ing conditions, has been met beyond half way by 
some of the insurance journals, which, in this city, 
are published by the grace of the aid of the adver- 
tiser. 

Without the advertiser, the insurance journals of 
the coast could not exist. 

The Adjuster, Coast Review, The Pacific Under- 
writer and The Insurance Sun, by their articles, more 
or less endorse the position taken by the News Letter 
in regard to the enactment of the law which will 
create the department of State Fire Marshal. It is 
needed. To exemplify this, there is offered in evi- 
dence the report of the State Fire Marshal of Ohio, 
which says, to illustrate the value of the department 
in that State : 

"The object is to attract public attention to the 
causes of the great loss of wealth, amounting to 
more than six millions a year in Ohio, from the ig- 
norant or reckless handling of combustibles. The 
number of fires from each cause will be given ; the 
scientific facts relating to the ignition of substances 
in common use stated, and the proper precautions in 
handling combustible materials will be indicated. In- 
teresting results of work of inspecting buildings re- 
cently begun by Deputy Fire Marshals will be recited 
and the methods of those who burn to defraud insur- 
ance companies will be shown. 

"Fires reported to the State Fire Marshal during 
1904 as being caused by gas explosion, gas leaks and 
by explosion, number 94, but many fires reported as 
from unknown cause are doubtless properly charge- 
able to gas. 

"Gas leakage under the impervious pavements of 
cities is a subtle, uncontrollable menace to property 
and to life as well. Many mysterious conflagrations 
presenting inexplicable phenomena are due to the 
presence in houses of gas which has entered through 
the cellar from a leaking main. 

( las companies anticipate a loss from leaks of 12 to 
20 per cent of all the gas they force into their mains, 
it being cheaper to bear that loss than to open the 
streets and repair the pipes. 

"The authoritative tables of Field's Analysis of 
Gas Undertakings show that in the cities of England 
the gas leakage is about 500,000 cubic feet per mile 
of main per annum. 

In small towns, this gas escapes harmlessly through 
the earth, except when the ground is frozen, but under 
the asphalt and stone pavements of the city it is at 
all times forced along the outside of the main until it 
finds a fill around a service pipe, which, by reason of 
its being more open, offers a path of least resistance 
into the cellar of some house. If the ventilation of the 
cellar is not ample, the gas, being lighter than air, 
accumulates in coal vaults or between the joists, 
where an accidental spark, the striking of a match or 
the flame of a candle will ignite it with or without 
explosion. If the amount of the escaping gas is large, 



it may be found in layers next the ceiling of every 
story of the house. 

"This insidious enemy gives no warning, because 
in passing through the earth its olefiants and imper- 
fectly assimilated naptha vapors, which give it odor, 
are filtered out. 

"The reckless use of gasoline in Ohio caused 395 
fires during 1904 ; 396 in 1903 ; 473 in 1901. The many 
appalling accounts of persons being burned to death 
by explosions of this product of petroleum does not 
seem to have taught the people a proper appreciation 
of its power to destroy. They are, perhaps, not 
aware that the vapor arising from gasoline when 
mixed in a proportion of over 7 per cent with the air, 
is one of the most dangerous explosives. The lia- 
bility of powder to explode in handling is but slight 
if compared with that of gasoline. 

"At the ordinary temperature of a dwelling, gaso- 
line continually gives off inflammable vapor, and a 
light, a spark or a lighted cigar within a distance of 
ten feet from the material may ignite it through its 
vapor, which explodes. The vapor from one pint of 
gasoline will, in the absence of free ventilation, make 
200 cubic feet of air explosive. It depends upon the 
proportion of air and vapor whether it becomes a 
burning gas or an explosive. The danger does not 
lie so much in the devices for its use as in having it 
about. The wide-spread practice of using it for clean- 
ing purposes is reckless indeed, for aside from its 
making the surrounding air explosive, the friction 
from rubbing textile fabrics in it may produce an 
electrical spark, which will ignite it and set the room 
ablaze." 

* * * 

The News Letter published in advance figures of 
the results of fire insurance in 1904 business for the 
coast, which it obtained from the Pacific Under- 
writer, and the edition sold itself out. 

* * * 

There have been some questions asked this office 
and some few telephone messages received, as to the 
correctness of the figures published. With this the 
Xews Letter has nothing whatever to do. The periodi- 
cal which gave the figures is usually correct, and there 
is no reason to doubt that the published figures are 
any other than correct, except in the rules. 

Long before any other insurance journal dared 
make a guess at the loss ratio of California, the News 
Letter said ~>>7 P er cent. As a matter of fact, the es- 
timate was correct, but in theory the California losses 
do not average the thirty-seven within 3 points, ex- 
cluding, of course, that immortal bugaboo which can- 
not be taken into consideration — losses incurred. 

* * * 

Senate Bill 29, introduced by Senator Shortridge 
is : "An Act to Add a New Section to the Civil Code, 
to be Numbered Section Four Hundred and Twenty- 
three, Relating to Deposits by Insurance Companies 
for the Protection of Policy-holders." This is a sort 
of one of the usual hold-up bills, and is not worth 
any comment, since the reciprocity clause is already 
a statute on the books of California. 



Something New 



is always happening in a poker game — two deuces 
take the pot, etc. We have all the latest novelties in 
playing cards, poker chips, counters, dice and the 
cheapest line of pretty tally cards and prizes in the 
city. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 .Market street. 



January 18. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO 




NOCTURNE. 

Hr Ma-liann Ca«reln In The Header 

of violet blue, 
Rimmed with a thorn of tire. 
The new-moon hangs in a -k\ of dew : 
And nnder the vines, where the sunset's hue 

Seems turned to blossoms, tirst one. then two, 

Begins the crickets' choir. 

Bright hlurs of golden white. 
With points of pearly glimmer, 
The first stars wink in the web of night; 
And through the garden the moths take Right, 
In the honeysuckle-colored light, 

\\ here the shadowy shrulis grow dimmer. 

Soft through the dim and dying eve, 

Sweet through the dusk and dew. 

Come, while the hours their witchcraft weave. 

Dim in the House of the Soul's-sweet-leave, 

Here in the pale and perfumed eve. 

Here where I wait for you. 

A great dark, radiant rose, 

Dripping with starry glower. 

Is the night, whose bosom overflows 

With balsam musk of the breeze that blows 

Into the heart, — as each one knows, — 

Of every nodding flower. 

A voice that sighs and sighs, 

Then whispers like a spirit, 

Is the wind, that kisses the drowsy eyes 

( )f the primrose open, and, rocking, lies 

In the lily's cradle, and soft unties 

The rosebud's crimson near it. 

Sweet through the deep and dreaming night, 

Soft through the dark and dew, 

Come, where the moments their magic write, 

Deep in the Book of the Heart's-delight, 

Here in the hushed and haunted night, 

Here where I wait for you. 

THE RETURN. 
By Theodo3ia Garrison in Harper's Buzar Z 
When I come back again, oh, friend, my friend, 

Against whose love I sinned a sorry sin, 
When at your door a prodigal I bend 
Will you not let me in? 

For lo! I knew before that time I went, 
A wanderer for all adventure fain, 

That one day on the road of discontent 
I should come back again. 

Shall I from very far behold the light 

You set for me, and through the open door, 

Thrown wide to wait my coming in the night, 
Enter your heart once more? 

Or shall I stand a supplicant unheard 

Before the darkened gate, a famished thing 

Starving and thirsting that unspoken word 
That proves your welcoming? 

I may not guess what waits me at the end 
Of my repentance, be it joy or pain. 

How shall it be with us, oh, friend, my friend, 
When I come back again? 



NEWS LETTER. ,7 
INSURANCE 

FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSUKANCK. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 

Capital. $1,000,000. Assets, $5,850,000 

Founded a d, ins. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital 13.000.000 

Surplus to Policy-holder* 6.022.011 

JAMES IV BAIL.BT, OCTeral Agent. 202 Pine St.. 8. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 
Capital Paid-up. J3.44G.100. Assets. 124.662.043.36 

Surplus to Policy-holders. 38,930.431.41. Losses Paid, over 3134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager. 501 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL, F. KINGSTON. Local Mgri. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established I860. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 5.34°.i36.94 

Surplus to Policyholders. . 3,414,921.16 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH. Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOTD, Agent for San Francisco, 216 Sansome Street. 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. 
LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 



British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital 36,700,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

■>i Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Agt, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 



Cash Capital, $200,000.00 



Cash Assets, $387,306.99 



PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Head Office, 431 California St- San Francisco. 

The only local company writing liability insurance exclusively. 

The only company confining its attention to liability insurance. 

Officers— Edmund F. Green. President; John 0. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent : F. A. Zane, Secretary ; Ant. Borel & Co.. Treasurers ; F. P. Deer- 
ing. Counsel. 

Directors— A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edw- L. Brayton. Jno. 0. Coleman- 
F. P. Deering, E, F, Green, I. W. Hellman Jr , George A. Pope, Henry 
Rosenfeld. A. A. Sod, Win. S. Tevis. 




TOM 

DULON 

SCO. 

OPPOSITE 

PALACE HOTEL 

HAT OEDEBB 



28 SAN FRANCISCO 
BANKING. 

Wells Fargo & Co., Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Capital. SurplM and Undivided | $ | g^OO.OOO 

Homer S. King. President; P. L. Lipman, Cashier; Frank B. 
King, Assistant Cashier; Jno. E. Miles, Assistant Cashier. 

BRANCHES— New York; Salt Lake. Utah; Portland, Ore. 

Correspondents throughout the world. General banking busi- 
nes transacted. 

The Sen Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco. 

James K. Wilson. President; Wm. Pierce Johnson. Vice-President; 
C. K. Mcintosh. Vice-President; F. W. Wolfe. Cashier ; C. L. Davis, 
Assistant Cashier. 

Capital. $500,000. Surplus and undivided profits, $1»0,000. 
Directors— William Pierce Johnson. Wm. J. Dutton. Geo. A. Pope 
C. S. Benedict, George Aimer Newhall, W. H. Talbot, H. D. 
Morton. C. K. Mcintosh. Jas. K. Wilson. 

Agents— New York— Hanover National Bank. Chemical National 
Bank. Boston— National Shawmut Bank. Philadelphia— Drexel 
& Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— Mechan- 
ics' National Bank. Denver— National Bank of Commerce. Kan- 
sas City— First National Bank. London— Brown. Shipley & Co. 
Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. Johannesburg— Robinson South 
African Banking Co., Ltd. 

The Canadian Be^nkof Commerce 

With which is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. 

HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 

Paid-up Capital, $S, 700,000. Reserve Fund, $3,600,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $90,000,000. 

HON. GEORGE A. COX, President. 

B. E WALKER. General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St.. E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, Cranbrook, 

Fernie, Greenwood. Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, 

New Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland. Seattle and Shagway (Alaska). 

Also 92 other branches, covering the principal points in 
Manitoba. N. W. Territories, and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, the Bank of 

Scotland, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd. The Union of London and Smiths 

Bank. Ltd. ' . , , 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 

San Francisco Office 325 California Street. 

A. KAINS, Manager. Bruce Heathcote, Asst. Manager. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,500,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund. $1,100,000 
Head Office— 10 Threadneedle St., London, E. C. 
AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank. Limited. No. 10 Wall Street. N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 

credits issued. „ „„.. „ . ., 

SIG GREENEBAUM. Manager; H. S. GREEN, Sub-Mana- 
g er; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized, $6,000,000 Paid-up, $1,600,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
make telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
monev. buvs and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART. P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 
T. FRIEDLANDER, Cashier. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS— William Alvord, William Babcock, S. L. Abbot. 
O. D. Baldwin, L. F. Monteagle, Warren D. Clark. E. J. McCut- 
chen, R. H. Pease, J. D. Grant. 

4 1-2 Per Cer\t Interest Paid 

Phoenix Savings B. ©. L. Association 

Pays 4V& per cent interest on ordinary savings accounts. Interest 
compounded semi-annually, and 5 per cent on term accounts of 
$100 or more, interest payable semi-annually. 

616 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

Subscribed Capital $8,000,000 

Paid-in Capital 1,240.000 

Guarantee Capital 200,000 

Real estate loans made on Improved property, principal and In- 
terest payable in monthly installments similar, to rent. 
DIRECTORS 

A. A. Watkins. Charles R. Bishop, S. Prentiss Smith, George 

C. Boardman, Charles E. Ladd, Gavin McNab. Clarence Grange, 
Managing Director. 



NEWS LETTER. 



January 28, 1905. 




Financial 




The figures for Califor- 
The Conservative Life nia business filed with 
Leads all Companies. the Insurance Commis- 
sioner, show the strenu- 
ous California company at the head of the procession. 
Its gross writings for the year in the State were 
$9,043,423. The next on the list is the New York 
Life, with $8,586,099. Then follows the Equitable 
Life, with $7,272,650; then the Mutual Life, with 
something over $5,000,000, and the Pacific Mutual 
passing the $4,000,000 mark. 

As compared with the results of last year, the Con- 
servative Life gains two millions, and jumps from 
third place to first place. The New York Life gains 
a million, still holding second place. The equitable 
Life shows a loss of more than two millions, and 
drops from first place into third. The Mutual Life 
shows a gain of more than one-half a million, while 
the Pacific Mutual shows a slight loss in its home 
State. In the main, the other companies show gains. 
In the matter of premiums, the Conservative Life 
likewise leads, showing $20,000 more than its nearest 
competitor. The New York Life is second in this re- 
spect; the Equitable third; the Pacific Mutual fourth, 
and the Mutual Life fifth. 

The following table shows the exact standing in the 
matter of California business for 1904 for the com- 
panies writing a million or more in the State ; 

Company No. Amt. Premium 

1. Conservative $8,882 $9,043,423 $384,126 

2. New York 4,749 8,586,099 362,875 

3. Equitable 3,270 7,272,650 294,031 

4. Mutual 2,270 5,244,499 176,703 

5. Pacific Mutual 5,814 4,256,164 203,375 

6. Metropolitan 3,274 2,565,924 90,791. 

7. Northwest'rn Mutu'l 1,142 2,503,450 101,74'! 

8. Pennsylvania Mutu'l 987 2.337. 5O8 100,181 

9. Aetna 1,281 2,196,725 91.303 

10. Mutual Benefit 568 1,530,350 53,334 

11. Prudential 694 1,280,376 53>35 8 

12. New England Mutu'l 589 1,101,750 44.954 

Business has been rather quid 
Pine-St. Market, on Pine street, with prices 

steady and generally firm in 
the north-end, which is the main center of attraction 
just now. This can be accounted for by the fact that 
the larger class of dealers are not doing much trad- 
ing for the present. They arc heavily interested in 
Opbir, naturally. What they have bought they hold, 
which keeps them practically out of the market. 
Should the price break back to a point where it seems 
to them a boy could buy more shares to increase thtir 
holdings which, as a rule, were acquired at very low 
figures compared with the prices quoted to-day, where 
they stand pat awaiting the result of future develop- 
ments. Should these prove favorable, as they are 
likely to, the purchases of these people will begin 
again, and the advance in prices resulting therefrom 
will bring the short interest into camp again. For the 
moment, dealers of the latter persuasion are hoping 
against hope for a turn-down in the market. When 
the chippers bring about a light retrograde move- 
ment in values by their very limited operations, the 
cornered shorts do all in their power to assist, but so 



January 28. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

n tins line must ha 

the quick 
recent decline 

which h ffcred on the • 

bull standpoint. I 
rive the - 
Icrable value, *,, that holders of cheap stock are 
in a position to make a close calculation of pos 
results, while standing to make a possible winning "i 
toney. They have the situation well in hand, 
ami with a competent leader on the street, with the 
nerve ami brains and capital of the big men on the 
street in the later seventies, it would not be much of 
a trick in engineer another hull market as sensational 
in effect as that which livened the new world up in 
the days of the "Big Bonanza." 



NEWS LETTER. ^ 

tmpany will he held on 
.•5th. 



Business in the Tonopah-Goldfield shares has ii"t 
been quite so heavy as usual during the past week. 
The total of sales on the San Francisco Stock Ex- 
change aggregated 225,22] shares during the week. 
with a total of 134,200 shares on the San Francisco 
and Tonopah Mining Exchange. The heaviest trad- 
ing, as usual of late, was in MacNamara, of which 
51,1x10 shares changed lands. 21.400 in the big Hoard 
anil 32,000 in the Tonopah Exchange. In the latter, 
1 'riginal Bullfrog was also largely dealt in, the sales 
aggregating 34.500 shares. Transfers also were re- 
corded of 37.700 Midway on the Tonopah Exchange, 
with sales of 10,400 shares on the Big Board. There 
1 ave been few changes in prices. Montana-Tono- 
pah ruled steady at from $2 to $2.10. Midway scored 
an advance from 34 to 46 cents. Sandstorm sold up 
to 60 cents. Goldfield Mining sold up to J2 cents. 
MacNamara sold as high as 32 cents. There is some 
talk now of a consolidation of the principal mines 
of Tonopah. The Schwab interest has bought, it is 
said the controlling interest in the Ohio-Tonopah. 
It is also considered suggestive, the recent purchase 
of a large block of the North Star treasury stock. 

The market for local securities 

The Local Stock has been quite active of late, 

Market. and sugars have shown gains 

which have been very satisfac- 
tory in many cases. Hawaiian C. & S. has been es- 
pecially so, sales having been made as high as 90 1-2. 
The latest prices reached at this writing are : Onomea, 
$39-75; Makaweli, $37.25; Honokaa, $24.50; Hutchin- 
son, $17.73, an d Paauhau at $27.50. Alaska Packers 
has made a lower record, with a quotation of 88J/2 
bid. A week feeling was shown' in Gas and Electric. 
Bonds have been quieter, but any choice offerings are 
readily absorbed. The Northern California Power 
Company has just paid its regular monthly dividend 
of 5 cents per share, amounting to $5,000. The Pa- 
cific Coast Borax Co. will pay its regular monthly 
dividend of $1 per share on January 30th, and the 
Pacific Lighting Co. one of 35 cents per share on Feb- 
ruary 6th. 



The local oil share market is quiet. Very little is 
doing in the unprotective shares, and those which are 
paying dividends are not offered very freely. The 
Claremont Oil Company has declared a regular 
monthly dividend of 1 cent per share, payable Febru- 
ary 1st. The Universal Oil Mining Company of Kern 
County will hold its delinquent sale on January 30th. 
The United States OH and Mining Company, of 
Bakersfield has levied an assessment of 1 cent per 
share. The assessment of 5 per cent on the capital 
stock of the Perseus Oil Company will become delin- 
quent January 30th. The postponed delinquent sale 



\t the meeting of the shareholders of th< 
Railroad » Company, held on 1 

of the compan) was increased from 
I in purchasei 3 of tin 
000 bond issue authorized will have the 
convert them into common stock, so the shares will 
not be issued. 



Japanese art goods, portierres, and draperies ol 
elusive design and complete assortment, may lie found 

at George T. Marsh & Co.'s, 214 Posl street. 



BANKING. 

Sa.n Francisco S swings Union 

532 California St.. cor. Webb St. San Francisco. 

E. B. POND. President; W. c. B DeFKEMK.RY. ROBERT 
WATT. Vice Presidents; LOVELL. WHITE. Cashier; R. M. 
WELCH. Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— E. B. Pond, W. C. B. DeFremery. Henrv F. Allen. 
Wakefield Baker. Jacob Barth. C O. U. Miller, Fi cd H. Beaver. Wil- 
liam A. Maeee. Robert watt. 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co.. or by checks 
of reliable parties, payable In San Francisco, but the responsi- 
bility of this savings bank commences only with the actual re- 
ceipt of the money. The signature of the depositor should ac- 
company the first deposit. No charge Is made for pass book 
or entrance fee. 

Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

Deposits June 30, 1904 $33.94n,132 

Guarantee Capital, Paid-up 1,000,000 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 076.109 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

710 Market St., opposite Third. 

Guarantee Capital (1,050.000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 5 5,00" 

Deposits, over 9,00,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Presi- 
dent: JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President; GEORGE A. STORY 
Cashier; C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors — James D. Phelan. S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Moffltt, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McEiroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent on postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 

The German Savings 6. Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,474.SIH 82 

Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash 1,000,000 

Deposits, Deo. 31, 1904 37.2S1.377.60 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President, Daniel Meyer; Second . Vice-President, H. Horstmann; 
Ign. Steinhardt, Emll Rohte, H. B. Russ, N. OhJandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herr- 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Continental Building & Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 

301 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital $17,000,000.00 

Paid-in Capital ' 3,600,000.00 

.Profit and Reserve Fund 460,000.00 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; William Corbin, Secretary 
and General Manager. 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital $3,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1,725,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or 
Trustee, Check accounts solicited, Legal Depository for money In 
Probate Court proceedings. Interest paid on Trust Deposits and 
Savings. Investments carefully selected. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Seg. Belcher & Mides Mining Company. 

Assessment :?2v<?2 

Amount per share f • ■» ? e °I,° 

Levied Jan - 4.190s 

Delinquent in office •■Jf.V,- ISC' 

Day of sale of delinquent stook Feb. 27, 1905 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
Office— Room 50, No. 809 Montgomery* treet. Pan Francisco, Cal. 



30 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

&f>e Jarring of Wilmot 



January 28, 1905. 



However tragic Jimmy's wots may have been to 
Jimmy, Wilmot evidently was rather amused by 
them. 

"My dear fellow," lie said, when Jimmy had finished 
speaking. "Of course your love was like no other. 
Every love is like 110 oilier — to the fellow concerned." 

"But I could have taken an oath she loved me." 
Jimmy's voice was full of misery. 

His friend smiled. "We take a great many oaths 
there's no possible ground for." he said. "Have a 
cigar:" 

He pushed the box towards Jimmy, who took one 
with gloomy indifference. 

"Cigars are excellent for wounded hearts — and 
vanity," his friend went on cheerfully, "(lot these 
over in Cuba, myself. I keep them in reserve for 
special occasions." He looked at Jimmy, as if ex- 
pecting some show of appreciation. "Have a match," 
lie said, proffering the one with which he had just 
lighted his own cigar. 

Jimmy took it. but let it go out without using it. 
Mi- friend smoked awhile in speculative silence. 

"Success in love is a queer thing, Jimmy." lie ob- 
served, following a curling line of smoke upward with 
his cigar. "A very queer thing. The deserving are 
not always.the successful, by any means. Now, in 
most human affairs, the gods have fixed laws, so that 
usually we can anticipate the consequence of most of 
the actions of men, but in love, the gods play at a kind 
of toss up with the hearts of men and women. If 
you are lucky, the heart of your choice may fall to 
you, but it's an uncertain game at best." 

"She gave me every kind of encouragement," 
Jimmy complained, with doleful voice. 

1 1 is friend was studying the vanishing lines of 
smoke. "Given the same circumstances and two love 
affairs." he went on musingly, as if he were following 
out his own line of thought, rather than addressing 
Jimmy ; he had not noted the latter's remark. "Given 
the same circumstances and tw r o love affairs, one may 
be a success — that is, success as denned in the lover's 
dictionary ; while the other may be an absolute fail- 
ure — defined also in the same dictionary. It all de- 
pends "ii the linal toss-up of the gods." 

"Your ideas have a sound," grumbled Jimmy, "but 
reasoning is not an antidote for a woman's 'No.' To 
argue how things come about isn't a cure for any- 
thing." 

Wilmot pushed the match tray suggestively across 
the table. Jimmj look no notice of it. 

"Speaking of reasoning," said Wilmot, not in the 
least disconcerted, "that reminds me. I know a man. 
lie's one of the workmen in our factory. It pays to 
know one's workmen, Jimmy. This fellow is in love, 
too. Her name is Mandy, and she used to work in 
the factory. That's where he met her. She lives down 
in Hogan's place ; and she's got red hair, and the ac- 
companying freckles, and she's slightly cross-eyed." 
He paused, much taken up with his own reflections. 

Jimmy remained gloomily silent. 

Presently, the other resumed. "Vet they say that 
Mother Eve was wondrously fair, and that sin 
brought all the hideous things into the world. It's 
not much wonder we are so continually admonished 
to hate sin, considering the sights it has thrust upon 
us." 

Jimmy moved impatiently in his chair. 

' And the hovel she lives in !" the other continued. 
"What a downward evolution must have been in pro- 
gress from Paradise to that! You've been in Hogan's 
Place, haven't you, Jimmy?" 



"No," returned Jimmy, shortly. "Mandy don't 
interest me." 

His friend looked at him in some surprise. "No, 
of course not," he said, reflectively. "There's such 
a vast difference between your love for your angel 
lady and Jeems' love for his Mandy." • He laughed a 
little. 

"I'm sure I can't see any relation," Jimmy returned, 
resentfully. 

"Oh, don't be impatient, ray boy. Let's talk is over. 
There's nothing like reasoning a thing out. Philoso- 
phy really can be used as an antidote for love. A sub- 
stitute, anyway. You know what Dante did?" 

"Did what?" 

"Did use it for a substitute." Wilmot was evidently 
surprised at Jimmy's lack of comprehension. "As I 
was saying, there is a vast difference between your 
love and Jeems'. but it's only of caste, of caste, Jimmy. 
Jeems talks factory gossip and slang to Mandy. He 
takes her stick candy and 18-cent chocolates on his 
regular nights. And takes her on excursion boat 
rides on the Fourth of July ; then they have peanuts 
with popcorn and lemonade. For Christmas he gives 
her a celluloid hand-mirror in which to admire her 
peculiar type of beauty. ' 

"You seem to know a great deal about the affairs 
of your factory people." 

"Oh, I don't know any of the details. I'm not in- 
terested in mere incidentals. I only know the nature 
of these people, and I know that their affairs are con- 
ducted on about the order 1 have been describing to 
you." 

Jimmy made a protesting gesture. 

And vet. Jimmy, it was the same kind of attraction 
that led you to talk soulful things to your beloved; 
the dainty bits of poetry and subtle (lattery. Instead 
of the cheap candy, popcorn and peanuts, there were 
costly bon-bons in elaborate tissued boxes; and rare 
American beauties delivered by the proper buttons. 
In place of the annual boat ride excursion, there were 
repeated suppers at Delmonico's and boxes at the 
opera. With the degrees of civilization, things go 
up in quality and price, Jimmy. Then, there were 
tender, meaning hand-clasps instead of the unsavory 
kisses." 

Jimmy leaned a little forward and opened his mouth 




January 38. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



rcntl) thought better of it, and re- 
lumed his 

- 111 Man when 

issip, sitting on p.irk 

rn !-. how different that is 

from the .. umprehending light that glows 1 1 

*h* ' ing with you 

the luxury ol the Fifth avenue drawing room ! Mere- 
ly the difference of caste, differing much in ia< 
Mainly, for she was sincere and your angel \\a- 

Jimmy scowled. 

Wilmot inspected hi^ cigar, and perceiving is had 

gone out, relighted it. and offered the match to 

Jimmy, who tlii.-. time lighted hi- cigar. Both men 

while in silence, Jimmy indifferently, 

and Wilmol with evident enjoyment. 

"Now, love at 25 " the latter began con- 
solingly . 

"I'm >-." interrupted Jimmy. 

"\\ ell. 27. ( lh. my hoy. we can love such a lot of 
times. 1 was just going to say thai love at 25 i.- o;.lv 
a forerunner of the love that 'occur- each succeeding 
year until the shortness of lite puts an end to o.,r 
loving. 

Jimmy brushed the ash from his ci^ar. He couldn't 
feel its so,, thing- influence. His friend tossed the end 
Of his into tile open grate. "Let's have something 
to drink." he suggested, and without waiting I'm- a 
reply, rang the hell and gave the order. 

After the servant had left the room, Wilmot filled 
the glasses and offered one to Jimmy. "Let's drink 
to her better judgment, my boy," he said, "and to 
your love, a happy ending, after all. Who knows 
what a woman's answer may be a second time." He 
raised his glass. "Who is she, Jimmy?" he asked, 
as if moved by some sudden thought. 

Jimmy hesitated. "I don't think that matters, does 
it?" he said. "I told you she refused me, didn't I?" 

"Now, see here, Jimmy, let's don't have any half- 
confidences. Who is she? I told you I wished to 
drink to her better judgment." 

"I don't like to bring the girl's name into it," said 
Jimmy, reluctantly, "but I suppose you may as well 
know. Yes; you may as well know. It's Alice Har- 
rison." 

"Alice Harrison !" 

Jimmy looked up. 

Wilmot set his glass down upon the table with 
startling abruptness. The frail glass was shattered 
into fragments. The wine flowed upon the table. 

"Well?" said Jimmy, irritably. 

"Alice Harrison !" 

"Yes; Alice Harrison. You wanted to know." 

"Why, Jimmy, why, she's — engaged to me." 

— Myrtle Conger in 10 Short Stories. 

When you are thirsty for a "high ball," try one 
made of OLD KIRK Whiskey. It's the best on the 
market. 



Pies and cakes, ice cream and dainty desserts, the 
kind your mother used to make, are to be had at 
Swain's Bakery, 209 Post street. Simply telephone, 
and your wishes will be gratified. 

If you require a dainty piece of lacquer-ware to 
decorate a cozy corner, you will find a rare collection 
at Geo. T. Marsh & Co.'s, 214 Post street. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 17.50 

per ton; half ton J4; quarter ton $2. Full weight guaranteed. In 
economy, cleanliness and heat producing qualities, Briquette? 
are superior to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th 
and Channel. Phone South 95. 




;» 



CLASS 
WALL 
PAPERS 

AT ALL PRICES 

Interior 
Decorating 
Ideas and 
Estimates 
Furnished 

L. Tozer & 
Son Co. 

Retail daleflroom 

110 GEARY ST. 

2nd Floor 
Wholesale Department 

762-764 Mission 
Street 



COEFIELD ®. SHERMUND 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

GAS i ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

PLATING and 

METAL WORK 



660 MISSION ST., S. F. Near Third 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1930 



,-TAPv 


House and Church Wed 
dings. 


mw \w\ 


Receptions, Luncheons, 
Dinners, and Funerals. 


^DECORATORS A> 


Supply and care of flowers 
for offices. 

Choicest cut flowers. 


^sgumjsTs^^ 


^^ 


MISS LOUISE MANNING, Manager 

MRS. CLARICE COHEN, President 


246 StocKton St. 

Corner Post 
TELEPHONE MAIN 847 


REMOVAL NOTICE 


PATRICK & CO., have moved to their new 
quarters m-us SANSOME STEEET. where a 
complete line of Eubber Stamps, Stencils. Seals, 
Metal Checks, Box Brands, etc., can be found. 



Mothers be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing; Syrup" 

for your children while teathlng. 



H. ISAAC JONES, H. D. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Office— Starr King Building, 121 Geary street, San Francisco. 
Rooms, 303, 304, 305. Hours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m., 2 to 4 p. m. Sun- 
day by appointment. Telephone, Private Exchange, 216. Resi- 
dence, corner 5th avenue and 16th St., Oakland. Tel. East 36. 



30 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

&f>e Jarring of Wilmot 



January 28, 1905. 

"Mandy don't 



However tragic Jimmy's woes may have been to 
Jimmy, Wilmot evidently was rather amused by 
them. 

"My dear fellow," he said, when Jimmy had finished 
speaking. "Of course your love was like no other. 
Every love is like no other — to the fellow concerned." 

"Lint I could have taken an oath she loved me." 
Jimmy's voice was full of misery. 

His friend smiled. "We take a great many oaths 
there's no possible ground for," he said. "Have a 
cigar?" 

lie pushed the box inwards Jimmy, who took one 
with gloomy indifference. 

"Cigars arc excellent for wounded hearts — and 
vanity," his friend went on cheerfully. "Got these 
over in Cuba, myself. I keep them in reserve for 
special occasions." He looked at Jimmy, as if ex- 
pecting some show of appreciation. "Have a match," 
he said, proffering the one with which he had just 
lighted his own cigar. 

Jimmy took it. but let it go out without using it. 
His friend smoked awhile in speculative silence. 

"Success in love is a queer thing. Jimmy," he ob- 
served, following a curling line of smoke upward with 
his cigar. "A very queer thing. The deserving are 
not always.the successful, by any means. Now, in 
most human affairs, the gods have fixed laws, so that 
usually we can anticipate the consequence of most of 
the actions of men, but in love, the gods play at a kind 
of toss up with the hearts of men and women. If 
you are lucky, the heart of your choice may fall to 
you, but it's an uncertain game at best." 

"She gave me every kind of encouragement," 
Jimmy complained, with doleful voice. 

His friend was studying the vanishing lines of 
smoke. "Given the same circumstances and two love 
affairs," he went on musingly, as if lie were following 
out his own line of thought, rather than addressing 
Jimmy ; he had not noted the latter's remark. "Given 
the same circumstances and two love affairs, one may 
he a success — that is, success as defined in the lover's 
dictionary; while the other may he an absolute fail- 
ure — defined also in the same dictionary. It all de- 
pends on the final toss-up of the g'"ds." 

"Your ideas have a sound," grumbled Jimmy, "but 
reasoning is not an antidote for a woman's 'No.' To 
argue how things come about isn't a cure for any- 
thing." 

Wilmot pushed the match tray suggestively across 
the table. Jimmy took no notice of it. 

"Speaking of reasoning," said Wilmot, not in the 
least disconcerted, "that reminds me. 1 know a man. 
lie's one of the workmen in our factory. It pays to 
know one's workmen, Jimmy. This fellow is in love, 
too. Her name is Mandy, and she used to work in 
the factory. That's where he met her. She lives dovi n 
in Hogan's place ; and she's got red hair, and the ac- 
companying freckles-, and she's slightly cross-eyed." 
lie paused, much taken up with his own reflections. 

Jimmy remained gloomily silent. 

Presently, the other resumed. "Yet they say that 
Mother Eve was wondrously fair, and that sin 
brought all the hideous things into the world. It's 
not much wonder we are so continually admonished 
to hate sin, considering the sights it has thrust upon 
us." 

Jimmy moved impatiently in his chair. 

' And the hovel she lives in!" the other continued. 
"What a downward evolution must have been in pro- 
gress from Paradise to that ! You've been in Hogan's 
Place, haven't you, Jimmy?" 



"No," returned Jimmy, shortly. 
interest me." 

His friend looked at him in some surprise. "No, 
of course not," he said, reflectively. "There's such 
a vast difference between your love for your angel 
lady and feems' love for his Mandy."- He laughed a 
little. 

"I'm sure I can't sec any relation," Jimmy returned, 
resentfully. 

"( )h, don't be impatient, my hoy. Let's talk is over. 
There's nothing like reasoning a thing out. Philoso- 
phy really can be used as an antidote for love. A sub- 
stitute, anywav. You know what Dante did?" 

"Did wliat?" 

"Did use it for a substitute." Wilmot was evidently 
surprised at Jimmy's lack of comprehension. "As I 
was saying, there is a vast difference between your 
love and Jeems', but it's only of caste, of caste, Jimmy. 
Jeems talks factory gossip and slang to Mandy. He 
takes her stick candy and 18-cent chocolates on his 
regular nights. And takes her on excursion boat 
rides on the Fourth of July ; then they have peanuts 
with popcorn and lemonade. For Christmas he gives 
her a celluloid hand-mirror in which to admire her 
peculiar type of beauu . 

"You seem to know a great deal about the affairs 
of your factory people." 

"Oh, I don't know any of the details. I'm not in- 
terested in mere incidentals. I only know the nature 
of these people, and I know that their affairs are con- 
ducted on about the order I have been describing to 
you." 

Jimmy made a protesting gesture. 

And vet, Jimmy, it was the same kind of attraction 
that led you to talk soulful things to your beloved : 
the dainty bits of poetry and subtle flattery. Instead 
of the cheap candy, popcorn and peanuts, there were 
costly bon-bons in elaborate tissued boxes; and rare 
American beauties delivered by the proper buttons. 
In place of the annual boat ride excursion, there were 
repeated suppers at Delmonico's ami boxes at the 
opera. With the degrees of civilization, things go 
up in quality and price. Jimmy. Then, there were 
tender, meaning hand-clasps instead of the unsavory 
kisses." 

Jimmy leaned a little forward and opened his mouth 




^MI^t^I MM 



January j8. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

ml) thought better ol it. and r< 
turned hiv position in sil 

- in Mai 

- 1 1 1 1 11 j^ 'ill p.irk 

11 Mm. I., ,.« different that 1- 

from tlii 1 omprchending light tii.it gli ws i.i 

,nc ■ with >-ou am. 1 

the luxury ol the Fifth avenue drawing room I Mere- 
ly the difference "t' caste, differing much in lavor • 1 
Mandy, f<>r >lu- was sincere and \'>ur angel was 

Jimmy scowled, 

Wilmot inspected hi> cigar, and perceiving it had 

gone out, relighted it. and offered the match to 

Jimmy, who thi> time lighted hi> cigar. Both nun 

iwhile in silence, Jimmy indifferently, 

and Wilmot with evident enjoyment. 

''Now, love at 25 " tiu- latter began coi 

soling 

"I'm 27," interrupted Jimmy. 

"Well, 27. ( »h. my boy, we can love such a lot of 
times. I was just going to say that love at 25 1- 
a forerunner of the love that occurs each succeeding 

year until the shortness of life puts an end to ..7 
loving. 

Jimmy brushed the ash from his cigar. He couldn't 
feel its soothing influence. His friend tossed the end 
of his into the open grate. "Let's have something 
to drink." he suggested, and without waiting for a 
reply, rang the hell and gave the order. 

After tlie servant had left the room, Wilmot rilled 
the glasses and offered one to Jimmy. "Let's drink- 
to her better judgment, my boy." he said, "and to 
your love, a happy ending, after all. Who knows 
what a woman's answer may be a second time." He 
raised his glass. "Who is she, Jimmy?" he asked, 
as if moved by some sudden thought. 

Jimmy hesitated. "I don't think that matters, does 
it ?" he said. "I told you she refused me, didn't I ?" 

"Now, see here, Jimmy, let's don't have any half- 
confidences. Who is she? I told you I wished to 
drink to her better judgment." 

"I don't like to bring the girl's name into it," said 
Jimmy, reluctantly, "but I suppose you may as well 
know. Yes; you may as well know. It's Alice Har- 
rison." 

"Alice Harrison !" 

Jimmy looked up. 

Wilmot set his glass down upon the table with 
startling abruptness. The frail glass was shattered 
into fragments. The wine flowed upon the table. 

"Well?" said Jimmy, irritably. 

"Alice Harrison !" 

"Yes ; Alice Harrison. You wanted to know." 

"Why, Jimmy, why, she's — engaged to me." 

— Myrtle Conger in 10 Short Stories. 

When you are thirsty for a "high ball," try one 
made of OLD KIRK Whiskey. It's the best on the 
market. 




:» 



CLASS 
WALL 
PAPERS 

AT ALL PRICES 

Interior 
Decorating 
Ideas and 
Estimates 
Furnished 

L. Tozer & 
Son Co. 

Retail Salesroom 

110 GEARY ST. 

2nd Floor 
Wholesale Department 

762-764 Mission 
Streel 



COEFIELD (EL SHERMUND 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

GAS i ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

PLATING and 

METAL WORK 



660 MISSION ST., S. F. Near Third 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1930 



Pies and cakes, ice cream and dainty desserts, the 
kind your mother used to make, are to be had at 
Swain's Bakery, 209 Post street. Simply telephone, 
and your wishes will be gratified. 

If you require a dainty piece of lacquer-ware to 
decorate a cozy corner, you will find a rare collection 
at Geo. T. Marsh & Co.'s, 214 Post street. 




MISS LOUISE MANNING, Manajer 

MRS. CLARICE COHEN, President 



House and Church Wed 
dings. 

Receptions, Luncheons, 
Dinners, and Funerals. 

Supply and care of flowers 
for offices. 

Choicest cut flowers. 



246 Stockton St. 

Corner Post 
TELEPHONE MAIN 847 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only $7.50 

per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Full weight guaranteed. In 
economy, cleanliness and heat producing qualities, Brlquetter 
are superior to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th 
and Channel. Phone South 95. 



REMOVAL NOTICE 



PATRICK & CO., have moved to their new 
quarters 111-113 SANSOME STEEET. where a 
complete line of Eubber Stamps. Stencil*. Seals. 
Metal Checks, Box Brands, etc.. can be found. 



Mothers be sure and use "Mrs. WInslow's Soothing Syrup" 

(or your children whlla teething. 



H. ISAAC JONES, M. D. Ey«, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Office— Starr King Building, 121 Geary street, San Francisco. 
Rooms, 303, 304, 306. Hours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m., 2 to 4 p. m. Sun- 
day by appointment. Telephone, Private Exchange, 216. Resi- 
dence, corner 6th avenue and 16th St., Oakland. Tel. Ea»t 36. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Penuriousness and Pleasure 

By Lady Algy. 

Every now and then an interrogation which ran- 
kles, trickles from the pen of some society scribbler. 
"Is the Smart Set really smart?" queries one dispen- 
ser of social tid-bits; "Is the Smart Set provincial?" 
asks another society gusher, with little exclamations 
of horror between gushes. But here's a question 
that will make society hold on to its temper with 
both hands, for fear ol losing it: "Is the Smart Set 
penurious?" 

The question popped from my pencil apropos of a 
stray bit of conversation that floated my way at a re- 
cent tea. Two girls were discussing a dinner party 
which a wealthy bachelor host is going to give in 
honor of a popular matron and her daughter. 

"He's so generous, I'm sure we'll have a 'corking' 
time," said one girl. 

"I hope he never marries," said the other. "Men 
catch the niggardly spirit from their wives." 

Now, wouldn't that make you sit bolt upright? 
There's a time-honored, moth-eaten theory that it's 
woman's extravagance which makes money take 
wings. But after lending ear to the aforementioned 
dialogue, I have been applying that theory to a num- 
ber of society women, and it doesn't fit them a little 
bit. Royal spenders in the San Francisco Smart Set 
have never been of the feminine persuasion. Ask 
the caterers and decorators whether they prefer a 
host to a hostess, and you will hear some illuminat- 
ing and disparaging remarks on the mercenary spirit 
of woman. When a man entertains, you will be told, 
he forgets that it is a social obligation, and gets lost 
in the sheer delight of providing every amusement 
for his guests that money can buy. A woman usually 
entertains because "it's her turn next," and if she does 
it on a lavish scale, it's in a spirit of rivalry — the 
desire to outdo Mrs. So-and-So. 

Is it any wonder that society people are gradually 
exiled to Boredom? In the effort to get pleasure out 
of life, men and women both err. Smoothc the creases 
out of your tempers, ladies, for the charge of penuri- 
ousness, even if merited, is no worse than that which 
might be laid at the door of the men. Charles Wag- 
ner, prophet of the simple life, says that "Pleasure 
is a sacred flame that must be fed, that throws a 
splendid radiance over life." It cannot be fed on 
gold alone, so the hosts who think, by a prodigal 
scattering of ducats, to give pleasure, arc foolishly 
flaunting' their wealth without propagating true joy. 

People who complain that entertainments have lost 
their flavor forget that "joy is not in things; it is in 
us." It is true that forms of entertaining degenerate 
occasionally into baby dinners, monkey supper, food- 
throwing contests, and other edifying spectacles. But 
there are still plenty of sane and generous people 
who like to give others a good time, so it seems a 
pity that society should not get more real amuse- 
ment out of life. 

Charles Wagner hits the nail resoundingly on the 
head when he says: "To give one's-self up heartily to 
diversion, one must feel himself on a solid basis; 
must believe in life and find it within him. How do 
you think a man can be amused while he has his 
doubts whether, after all, life is worth living? Be- 
sides this, one observes a disquieting depression of 
vital force, which must be attributed to the abuse 
man makes of his sensations. Excess of all kinds 
has blurred our senses and poisoned our faculty for 
happiness. Human nature succumbs under the ir- 
regularities imposed upon it. Deeply attainted at its 
root, the desire to live, persistent in spite of every- 
thing, seeks satisfaction in cheats and baubles. In 



January 28, 1905. 

medical science we have recourse to artificial respira- 
tion, artificial alimentation, and galvanism. So, too, 
around expiring pleasure we see a crowd of its 
votaries, exerting themselves to re-awaken it, to re- 
animate it. Most ingenious means have been in- 
vented ; it can never be said that expense has been 
spared. Everything has been tried, the possible and 
the impossible. But in all these complicated alem- 
bics no one has ever arrived at distilling a drop of 
veritable joy." 

As soon as we realize that we must cultivate the 
faculty of being happy in order to be genuinely en- 
tertained, the question of amusement will not be so 
serious. The supercilious and the skeptic scatter 
more of the essence of kill-joy than the penurious. 
This is not in defense of the man or woman who 
sticks to money closer than mucilage. But it is to 
show that the blame for the demise of pleasure must 
be distributed. Girls who denounce teas as stupid 
affairs, and yet drag themselves listlessly to three or 
four a week ; women who give dinner parties, and ex- 
pect their guests' wits to sparkle when they them- 
selves never try to enjoy other people's parties ; men 
who go to a ball only to fringe the walls until supper 
time ; these people and others of their ilk are respon- 
sible for the flat, joyless state of affairs. Unfortu- 
nately, discontent is the most contagious of diseases, 
and until the captious members of society are cured, 
spontaneous pleasure will be thwarted. 




WITHOUT 

EQUAL FOR 

BRILLIANCY 

SIMPLICITY 

and 

ECONOMY 



IT CAN BE 

INSTANTLY 

ADJUSTED 

TO ANY 

KIND OF 

GAS JET 



The famous BLOCK LIGHT gives more light at less 
eost than any other light manufactured. It burns eight 
parts of air to one of gas. thereby greatly reducing 
your gas bills and at the same time giving an agreeable 
and powerful light. 

The mantles are the best; the glassware made in 
Germany under the highest tests and the light com- 
plete fully guaranteed. 

PRAGERS, the exclusive selling agents for 

San Francisco 



BLOCK LIGHT 
COMPLETE 



$1.25 



With Mantle, 
Shade and burner 



(■ . j\ LVVAY.S RED A BLE 

f MARKETS tJONES STS. 



GREEN TRADING STAMPS GIVEN 



January j8. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Financial 



33 



After the Company 
Swindlers. 



The attempt to reach the 
thieving get-rich-quick a 
cents by an investigation oi 
Senatorial commit) 
ttinj; at thr r.Hit of the evil, and about a- 
efficai the law of the State itself in punishing 

thieves of this class, once they arc within its grasp. 
The star chamber plan of investigation is an amusing 
feature of the programme, which is highly sug 
tive iii itself of a gentle deception which might 
amount to little more than the friendly advice, upon 
conviction, of "?;" and sin no more." If some means 
can he devised to semi these individuals to jail when 
they are convicted, instead of permitting them to 
walk around on hail after having been sentenced to 
pay the penalty of their crimes, people would In- 
inclined to place more credence upon the movement 
of the Legislature to check the rascality which has 
disgraced California for a long time past. The inten- 
tions of this Senatorial committee may he the best 
in the world, but their methods of going about the 
work are bad. 

The Mountain Copper Co. 
Keswick Labor Roll has at last announced its 
Reduced. intention of carrying on the 

larger portion of its opera- 
tions at its new smelter on Bullshead Point, above 
Martinez. One furnace instead of four will be kept 
running at its big Keswick plant, where 300 men will 
he kept employed instead of 1,200. This is the after- 
math of the hazing which has been kept up for years, 
the company having been charged with ruining the 
agricultural features of the country for miles around. 
If the people of this district in Shasta feel justified in 
being instrumental in driving out such an employer 
of labor, possibly the residents in the neighborhood 
of its new location will be equally pleased at the im- 
petus which ought now be given to their trade, by 
an increased circulation of money among them. 



The addition of the names of Mr. Edward H. Har- 
riman and John D. Rockefeller to the directorate of 
the Nevada Wells-Fargo Bank, is a vast increase 
to the strength of this old-time financial institution. 
For we may now speak of these two great banks as 
one, through the able efforts of Mr. I. W. Hellman, 
one of the Princes of Finance on this coast. Mr. Har- 
riman's entrance into the local banking field can only 
be an advantage to the financial world in general, as 
it brings some of the largest institutions of America 
in close touch with San Francisco and its business in- 
terests. Mr. Harriman is closely allied with Mr. 
Rockefeller and other wealthy and influential men of 
the East. 



1 








WIDELY 
MITATED BUT NEVER EQUALLEC 

THE GENUINE ' 


\ 






Murray SLanman's 

Florida Water 










"he Perfume of Perfumes 

REFRESHING, DELIGHTFUL. 

Without exception the best 
rollet Water In the World 

ASK TOUR DRU OGI8T FOB 

HURRAY & LANMAN'S 

AND SKI! THAT YOU GET IT. 




V 


J 



BOOTH'S DRY GIN 



FOR 

COCKTAILS, 
FIZZES 

and 
RICKEYS 
Hilbert Mercantile Co. 

Sole Agent* for Pacific Caul 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Cdfnin&ndi cho 
hlih««l prlco In 
London nnd I* 
r«< odrtlrtiu tv ■ 
Iho Bom Drv 
Gin. th» world 
ov»r. 



"TIM Busy Man's Train. 1 



Appropriate in its Name- 
Appropriate in its Route. 
Appropriate in its Character— 

"THE 20th CENTURY LIMITED" 



This is THE century of all the ages. 

The New York Central— Lake Shore 20- 
hour train between New York and Chicago 
(the two great commercial centers of Amer- 
ica) is THE train of the century, and is ap- 
propriately named. 

"THE 28th CENTURY LIMITED" 

A beautiful etching of this train printed 
on plate paper 24x32 inches ready for fram- 
ing, will be sent free to any address on re- 
ceipt of 50 cents, by George H. Daniels, 
General Passenger Agent, Grand Central 
Station, New York. 



WM. A. FAGAN 



P. DECKER 



DECKER-FAGAN CO. 

Electrical Contractors 

Estimates Furnished on All 
Classes of Wiring. Repair Work 
a Specialty : : : : 

185 JESSIE ST., Near Third 

Phone Main 3118 



Agents 
FAGAN DOOR OPENER CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MR. 


ALBERT 

ARCHITECT 


FARR 


REMOVED 






120 SUTTER ST. 



Bed Eyes and Eye- 
lids. Gran u 1 a t a d 
Eyelidi and other 
Era troubles oured 



MURINE EYE REMEDY 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 28, 1905. 



BUSH ®> MALLETT CO. 



INCORPORATED 




Bush & Mallett Co., one of the best-known firms in the city, occupy a large portion of the ground 
floor of the Crossley Building, their entrances being at 618 Mission street and from 115 to 119 Jessie 
street. They are wholesale and retail dealers in mantels, grates, tiles, fire-place and bathroom furniture 
and parquetry hardwood floors. At the factory, corner Sixth and Bluxome streets, there are manufac- 
tured wood mantels, sideboards, bookcases, wood grilles, parquetry floors and other hardwood finish. 

The business of Bush & Mallett Co. has increased to such an extent that they became so cramped for 
room and shipping facilities they were obliged to move from 328 Post street to the more commodious 
quarters they now occupy. The growing importance of Mission street as a business center largely en- 
tered into the consideration of the move and no better location for their business could be selected than 
the Crossley Building, almost in the shadow of the Palace and Grand Hotels. The new apartments have 
been elaborately fitted up, regardless of expense. From Mission to Jessie street is a succession of show- 
rooms, displaying the wares of the firm. They are fitted up in various tints, with rugs to match, the ar- 
rangement being designed to best show off the goods on exhibition, and the rooms are lighted and heated 
by electricity. The shipping facilities are the very best and assure the most prompt delivery. 



618 Mission Street 



115-119 Jessie Street 



January 28. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



35 



Lamp- 



ney 



-chim- 
s that break 
are not 

Macbeth's. 



If ynu u<e a wp'iij chimney, you lose a 
good deal "f t»>th light ami comfort, anil 
waste a dollar or two a year a lamp on 
chimneys. 

Do you want the Index ? Write me. 

Mai BETH, Pittsburgh. 

SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thieves.,' 

"Mamma," asked small Elsie 
shortly after her new brother ar- 
rived, "what is baby's name?" "He 
hasn't any name, dear," was the 
reply. "Then," continued the lit- 
tle inquisitor, "how did he know 
he belonged here?" 

"See here, old man, what in thun- 
der did you mean by advising my 
daughter to go abroad to study 
music? She's no phenomenon, 
and I can't afford it. You know all 
that." "But we're on the same flat, 
aren't we? I know when I've had 
enough." 

Bacon — I heard Bumpton was 
confined to his bed this morning. 
Egbert — Nonsense ! I met him 
down at the post-office. Bacon — 
Oh, well, he wasn't confined more 
than half an hour. You see, it was 
a folding bed, and the pesky thing 
closed up on him !" 

"But you have no ruins, no 
grand old piles, in the country," 
suggested the complaining for- 
eigner. "Say, come back to the 
safe and let me show you my pile 
of steel common certificates." 

Scientific Barber— Do you know 
that when the edge of a razor is 
examined under a microscope it 
has teeth like those of a saw? Cus- 
tomer — I don't need a microscope 
to know that. 

"Look here," exclaimed the irate 
householder ; "don't you know gas 
comes out of the furnace you sold 
me?" "Well, what do you expect 
to come out of a cheap furnace?" 
demanded the stove dealer. "Elec- 
tric lights?" 

"When a person's 'wool-gather- 
ing,' that means he's lazy, doesn't 
it, pa?" "Not necessarily, my son! 
He may be gathering the wool off 
the lambs in Wall street." 



A professor in a Western college 
while giving an examination in 
mythology in a country school, 

called upon a bright-looking girl, 
ami asked the following question: 
"Who was Ganymede?^ Promptly 
came the answer: "Ganymede was 
the son of < llympus and an eagle." 
The class teacher blushed for her 
pupil, and exclaimed : "Why, Eliza- 
beth I Where did you learn that!" 
"Indeed, it says SO in the book,' 

replied the girl, The professor 

then asked the girl to find the place 
and read the paragraph aloud. 

whereupon the class was both as 
b inished and delighted to learn that 
Ganymede was borne to (llympus 
by an eagle. 

An action for damages alleged 
to have been received in an auto- 
mobile accident was recently 
brought in an adjoining county. A 
woman had been thrown from a 
carriage, the horse attached to 
which was frightened by an auto- 
mobile. She landed in a ditch, and 
was not dangerously injured. Up- 
on being assisted to her feet, it is 
related, some one spoke of calling 
' a doctor, and suggested a physi- 
cian who visits his patients in an 
automobile. The injured woman 
protested, saying : "No, don't call 
him. I don't want an automobile 
doctor. Get me a horse doctor." 

A Scotch minister who was in 
need of funds thus conveyed his 
intentions to his congregation : 
"Weel, friends, the kirk is urgently 
in need of siller, and as we have 
failed to get money honestly, we 
will have to see what a bazar can 
do for us." It was a curate who 
read in the lesson for the day: "He 
spoke the word, and cathoppers 
came and grassipillars innumer- 
able." 

Mrs. Chugwater — Josiah, in this 
article in the newspaper about sa- 
loons, there's a whole lot about 
"local option." What does local 
option mean? Mr. Chugwater — 
It means that if you don't like any 
locality where there are saloons, 
you have the option of moving out 
of it. I should think you could tell 
from the words themselves. 

"What are you studying now?" 
asked Mrs. Cumrox. "We have 
taken up the subject of molecules," 
answered her son. "I hope you will 
be very attentive and practice con- 
stantly. I tried to get your father 
to wear one, but he couldn't made 
it stay in his eye." 

"Oh, you darling! I am so glad 
to hear of your happiness. What 
did Mr. Dickson say when he pro- 
posed?" "He said he had loved me 
from the very first." "I should 
never have suspected that; he is 
such a good looking young man." 



George ; 

nist arrived at th< 1 his 

first knickerboi 
penders, nist like papa wears. The) 

were the pride of ins h, ,, r t, and -it 

night he would lake them 01 
trousers and clasp them tight in 
his arms when he went to bed. His 
mother found them there the other 
night, and as they seemed to be 
making the little chap uncomfort- 
able, she took them away and laid 
them on a 'hair by his bed. The 
ne/.t morning he had a long inter- 
view with his mother. "Didn't you 
tell me, mamma," he said, "that an- 
gels watched everything I did?" 
"Yes, George." "Are they watch- 
ing me when I sleep?" "Yes, my 
son, they watch over you always, 
whatever you are doing." "Do they 
come right into my room at night?" 
"Yes. dear, the good angels are 
everywhere, always." "Then," said 
George meditatively, "I bet they've 
been monkeyin' with my 'spen- 
ders." 

"A South American country has 
its advantages," said the lady with 
the gold lorgnette. "But there are 
so many political disturbances." 
"Yes. Think of the opportunities 
for organizing daughters of the 
revolution." 

She — Did you send verses to the 
girl you were engaged to? He — 
Yes ; that was the whole trouble. 
She — I see ; she didn't like them. 
He — On the contrary, she did like 
them ; but she discovered that an- 
other fellow wrote 'em, and she 
married the other fellow ! 

Lady Customer — I would like to 
buy a muff. Gentlemanly Clerk — 
Certainly, ma'am; what fur? Lady 
Customer — I don't know that it's 
any ot your business, but I want it 
to keep my hands warm. (Tab- 
leau.) 

"Would you like the cause of 
your husband's death explained on 
the monument?" asked the sculp- 
tor. "Well," replied the widow, 
"if it doesn't cost any more, you 
might engrave a couple of cucum- 
bers on it." 







BETH ES DA 




THE GREAT AMERICAN 
MINERAL WATER 

LOUIS CAHEN ® SON. 

(WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

4I8 Sacramento St., San Francisco 





36 

HAND 
SAPOLIO 

Ts especially valuable during the 
jummer season, when outdoor occu- 
pations and sports are most in order. 

GRASS STAINS, MUD STAINS 

AND CALLOUS SPOTS 

yield to it, and it is particularly 

agreeable when used in the bath 

after violent exercise. 

ALL GROCERS AND DRUQGISTS 



Denman Thompson, of "Old 
Homestead" fame, was discussing 
with a party of friends the recent 
automobile race. 

"They hadn't any right," said 
one of the party, "to deprive the 
farmers of the highway which they 
are paying taxes for." 

In reply the actor told this story: 

"A few days after the race,'' he 
said, "I happened to be driving 
over part of the same course. I 
stopped at a farmhouse and asked 
to be allowed to give the horse 
some water. I got some good hard 
cider along with it. 

" 'What did you think of the au- 
tomobile race?" I asked my genial 
host. 

"The best thing for me that ever 
happened,' replied the farmer. 



ttawtCKtctfMWMCtcicicictfMCtftctctneic 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. January 28, 1905. 

" 'What!' I exclaimed. 'I thought squeezed it and squeezed it and 
aH you farmers were against it.' squeezed it, and every darn chicken 

' 'Not me,' said the farmer. 'You ran to the coop, every darn pig hid 
see, I got a balky mule that draws in the pen, every darn cow ran to 
my stuff into market every morn- the barn, the cat got behind the 
ing. Yesterday morning that mule stove, the dog got into his house, 
balked half way to the market, and 'Manda and me spent the quiet- 
Couldn't get him to stir. While I est night we've had in many a day. 
was trying to coax him I saw a No, siree, of all the labor-saving 
strange thing lying in the roadway, machines I ever did hear of, this 
Sort of a rubber thing. I picked is the best.' " 

it up and accidentally squeezed it. p on ce de Leon had discovered 
It let out a terrible noise, just like the fountain of youth. "Ain't it 
one of those machines, and that simple." he exclaimed as he dipped 
mule started, me on the taxi-board, in his finger and tasted the mixture, 
and never stopped until it got to » Whyj it > s nothi , )ut r and 

the ferry. I brought it home and burnt matches and a Httl | ink 
showed it to Manda, and we powder." 




Stylish * 
Suits 



15 



50 



Dressy Suits $20 
Pants $4.50 
My $25.00 Suits are the; 
best in America. 

1% F P« r Cent S«ved by get-J 
Z ting your suit made byfc 

JOE POHEIM I 

TBI TAILOR K 

IWuSwit 1110-1112 H.rket St £ 

J 201-203 Montgy St., $. F.S 




ALL THE YEAR 
ROUND TOURS 

Travel by Sea 



EialUot Service, Low Rites, (Deluding Berth and Meals 

Los Anneles San Diego Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Tacoma 

Victoria Vancouver Etc. 

And to those desiring longer tripB to 
Alaska and Mexico. 

For Information reftrdlngulltairds.tes etc., obtain folder 

SAN FRANCICS0 TICKET OFFICES 
4 New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St- , and Broadway Wharves- 

0. D. DUNANN, General Passenger Agent 
10 Market Street. San Francisco 




Trams leave and are rtue 
to arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Fbom Jantjart 15, 1905 

Fbbbt Depot 
(Foot of Market Street t 



Coast Line 

Narrow Gangs. 

(Foot of Market Street) 



MAIN LINE. 



— AltniVB 



7.00a Vacavtlle. Winters, Rwnsey 7 60p 

7.00a Benlcla. Elmlraand Sacramento . 7.20p 
7 30a Vallcjo. Napa, Caltstoga, Santa 

Itosa, Martinez, Sun Ramon, B-20p 

7 30a NIles.Tracy. Latlirop, Stockton.,.. 7 20p 

8 00a fihtiBiu Express — (Via Davis). 

Wllltame, Willows, tFruto. Red 

Bluff. Portland. Tacoma. Seattle 7.50p~ 

B 00a Davis. Woodland, Knights Landing. 

Marysvllle. Orovllle 7.5Qp_ 

8. 30a Martinez, Antloch. Byron, Tracy. 
Stockton, Newman. Loa Dnnos. 
Mend ota. Arm on a, Hanford. 
Vlsalla. Portervllle 4.20P 

B-30a Port Costa, Modeeto. Merced. 
Fresno, Goshen Junction, linn- 
ford, Vlsalla. Bakeratleld 4 5Qp 

8. 30a Nlles, San .lose, Llvermore, Stock- 
ton, (tMllton). lone, Sacmmento. 
MarysvMle. Chlco. Ited Bluff.... 4.20P 

830a Oakdnle. Chinese, Jameitown. So- 

nora, Tuolumne and Angels 4-20 P 

8.00a Atlantic Express— Ogden nod East. B20p 

9. 30a Richmond. Martinez and Way 

Stations 8 50p 

1000a The Overland Limited — Ogden. 
Omaha, Chicago, Denver, Kansas 

City 

10.00a Vallejo 

10- 00a Los Angeles Passenger — Port 
Coata. Martinez. Byron, Tracy, 
Lalhr-ip. Stockton. Merced. 
i:»v ml. Fresno. Oosln-n Junc- 
tion, Iliinfurd. Lcmoore, Vlsalta, 

Rakersfleld, Los Angeles 

10.00a El PftBO, Kansas City. tit. Louis 

"i Chicago 

12.00m tin) want. Nlles and Way Stations. 
M.00P Sacramento River steamers 

3-30P Benlcla, Winters. Sacramento. 
Woodland. Knights Landing, 
MarysvUle and Orovllle 

3.30p Hay ward. Nlles and Way Stations.. 

3 30p Port Costa, Marlines, By rou, Tracy, 

Latlirop, Stockton, M od •■ b i ", 

Merced, [trrriida mid Fresno. ,. 

4.00P Martinez, Sun It-iuioii.VnlleJo.Napa, 

Calls toga. Santa ICohii 

4 DOp NIU-b. Tracy. BtuuktOU 

430P Hay wanl. NIU-b, Irvlngton, Saul 

Jose, Llvermore ) 

1-OOptii.- Owl Liuilted— Newman, Los 

BflDOB, Mendotn, Fre-nu. Tulure. 

Bakeratleld, Lob Angeles 

B-OOp Golden sum- Limited — El Paao, 

Kansas City, St. Louis and 

Chicago 

IB 30p Hayward, Nlles ami Bnn Jose 

6-00 P Hayward. Nlles and San Jobo 

6.00p Eastern Express— Omaha. Chicago, 

Denver. Kansas City, St. Louis, 
Man Inez. Stockton. Sacramento. 
Colfax, Reno, spark*. Muntello, 

Oiideu 12-BOp 

B.OOp Vallejo. dally, -.'X'-'-pt Sunday ) 7 K n D 

7-OOP Vallejo, Sunday only f '°"^ 

7-OOp l.ictiinoiid. San Pal>lo. Port Costa, 

Martinez and Way .StatlOUB 

7 00p Reno Passenger— 1'. HI COHtA. Be' 
nlcla. SulBun, ICImlrn, Dixon, 
DaviM. Sacrament**, sparks, Tono- 

pah, Goidfleld and Keoler 7.60a 

8.06p Oregon & California ExpreBn— Sac- 
ramento, Marysvllle, Redding, 
Portland. I'ugel Sound and East. 9-50A 
8.1 Op Hay ward, Nlles and San Jose (Sun- 
dayonlyi 11-BOa 



fa. 1Ba Newark. Ocntervlllc. San Jose, 
Kt.li'. n. Boulder Creek. Santa 

Cruz and Way Stations S 55 p 

t2.16P Newark, Cetitervllle, San Jose, 
New A I in ad en, Lou GatO*, Feiton, 
Boulder Croek, Bantu Cruz and 

Principal Way Stations HO *i5a 

4. 16p Newark. San Jobc, Lob GbIob...-J ^ J|j* 

a9-30P Hunters' Trulu Saturday only)— 

San J se and Way Stations 17 25p 

COAST LINt (llnmd t-aiige). 
|3r (Third and t'owimend Streets.) 



8.20P 
12.20P 



7.20p 

3.20P 

tHOOP 



10-50a 
7-BOp 



12.20P 

9-20a 

10.20a 

i8.50a 

1 1 1.60a 



B.BOa 
720a 
950a 



6-10A Snn Jobu and Way Stations 6 31p 

7.00a Shu Jose and Way Stations 5 40p 

8. 00a New Altnadeu (Tuefl., Frld.. only). 4-10P 
8 00a The Coaster — sap JoBe, Salinas, 
San Ardo, Pobo RoMes, Santa 
Margarita, San LuIb Obispo, 
Guadalupe. Gavlota. Santa Bar- 
bara, San Buenaventura, Oxnard, 

Burbank. Los Angeles 10 30p 

8.00a Gllroy, Holllster. Castrovllle, Del 
Monte, Pacific Grove, Surf, Lom- 

poc 10-30P 

9.00a *>hii Jose. Tres Plnos.Watsonvllle, 
Capltola. Siiiita Cruz, Pucluc 
Grove. Stiifnus smi Luis Obispo 
and Prlnclp*: Way Stations. ... 4-10p 

10.30a San Jose and WayStatlotis 1.20p 

11 iC'ASun Jt»se mid Wn\ Maiious. 7.. 'Op 

2 IBp San Jo^e and Way Stations 8 36a 

3 LLP Del Mimie Express — Santa Clara, 
San Jose, W a t bo n v I I [ e. Santa 
Cruz. Del Monte, Monterey, 
PacTnc Grove 12-1Bp 

3-OOp Los Oatos. Wright. Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, via Santa Clara and 
Narrow Gauge -10-46* 

3 30p Valencia St., South San Francisco, 
Burllngiimc, San Jose, Gllroy, 
Hoi ilster. Tres Plnos 1 4Sa 

4-30P 'an Jose aod Woy Stations +8-Q0A 

tB-OOP Santa Clara, -»i:i Jose, I ■>- Gatoa, 

and principal Way StatlutlB, .. I9.00A 
i5 30p £ ii m .Jim ,■ u n 'l principal Way Suit Ions ',9.40 a 

B 4Bp Sunset BxpresB.-— lied wood, San 
Jose. Gllroy. Sal I n io-, I'uhi> Koliles. 
Sau Luis Obispo, Santa Uailoira 
Los Angeles, Iteming. El Paso. 
New Orleans 9 10a 

5.45p I'll PaBO, Kansas City, St. Louis, 

OWosm 10.30p 

6-4BP Pajaro, WatHi.nvllle, di iiluiln. 
Santa Cruz. Castrovllle. Del 

Monte, Pacific Grove 10-30p 

an Mateo, Be res ford, lie 1 1 n on t. San 
CarloB, Redwood. Fair Oaks. 
MenloPark. Palo Alto i6.48a 

6 30 p S><n Jose and Way Stations 6 36a 

8. 00p Palo Alto and Wny Stations 1Q.16a 

11 .30 p South Sau Francisco, Mtllbrne, Bur 
nngaine, San Mnteo, Belmont. 
San Carlos. Redwood, Fnlr Oaks. 

Menlo I'ark. and Palo Alto +9 4Bp 

o1130p Muytleld, Mountain View, Sunny- 
vale, Lawrence. Santa Clara and 
San Jose I9.4SP 



8.50a 16.16P 



OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY 

fFoot of Market St.) 
M7.1B a.m. 9.00a.m. 11.00 a.m. 

1.00 p.m. 3.00 p.m. 5.16 p.m. 

A Tor Morning. P for Afternoon 

\ l Sunday excepted l Sunday only 

(. Saturday only. l> Monday only. 

tbtops at all stations on Euduhv 

The UNION TKANSl Kit COMPANY 
will call for and check baggage trom hotels and rest- 
dencea Telephone. Exchange ttS. 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS Warr S 1 ^ d ari 

Sohmar Piano Agency 
308-J12 Post St.,San Francitcs 

Received Gold Medal— Highest Award World's Fair. St. Louis, 1904. 



Price per Copy. 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY ao, 1856. 

#M i FRANCIS 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 



(tf alif jo r nm^i» Jb jc rti sjer. 




Vol. LXX. 



SAN FRANCISCO. FEBRUARY 4. 1905. 



Number 5 



Ih. BAN FRANCISCO .NEWS LETTER la printed and published 
•very Saturday by the proprietor. Frederic Harriott, Halleck 
Building. 13> Sansome street. San Kranclaco. Cal. 

Entered at San Kranclaco PoslofBce aa second class matter 

New York Office— twhere Information may be OOUUnad n Kurdlng 
aubacrlpUona and advertising)— 3* Broadway. C C Murphy. 
Representative. 

London uttlce— 3D Cornhlll. E. C, England. Ueorgc Street it Co. 

All aoclal Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than • a. m. 
Thursuay previous to day of Issue. 



"boodle, li IK- ; who's got the li lie?" is the must 

popular game at Sacramento this winter. 

Hearst may have plenty of newspapers, but as- 
tute <.a\in McNab has one newspaper "in a hole." 

lWen are doing an increasing share of the housework 
in Reading. I 'a. It is not stated who cleans up after 
them. 



There was no injunction to slop the administra- 
tion's raid on Police Commissioner Hutton's resi- 
dence. 



It took a combination of city and county states- 
men to find out how much noise could be made with 
a fistful of "soundless money." 

A snowbank is blamed for the failure of a Chicago 
bank. This is truly unique — that is, unless it's a 
misprint for faro bank. 

The bills that the Senators pass up at the Capital 
and the bills that are passed to the Senators are very 
different, but still related to each other. 

Small wonder that a judge objects to being called 
"the man of last resort," when he thinks what he 
could do to the law if he really were. 

A young Oaklander has gone to an asylum because 
of a mind wrecked by cigarettes. There's no hope 
of salvage from such a mind as that. 

Washington, that great lumber State, has just 
elected to a comfortable seat in the United States 
Senate a gentleman most appropriately named Piles. 

People who have traveled much on trans-Pacific 
liners will be slow to believe that there is a regula- 
tion against shipping pigs on passenger steamers. 

A committee which did its investigating in private 
and took the "long green" in public, has gone and 
spoiled everything for the "business men" of the 
Legislature. 

It would be interesting to hear Eddie Graney's 
real opinion of a fire department that uses automo- 
biles instead of horses, for Graney is the official horse- 
shoer. 

While Society is getting brain-fag thinking up new 
ways of making its meals attractive, why^ is h: that 
some one does not come forward with invitations to 
a pajama luncheon ? 



An Oakland lady sociologist has resolved that the 

smaller the family', the better lor the race. And, it 

might be added, the smaller the egg, the better for 

the hen. 



We may not lie tin- mosl godly people "ii the globe, 

but lei us congratulate ourselves on the fact that we 
are stamping out all polygamy that is not run on the 
"tandem" plan. 



English scientists have found a way to get gold 

out of sea water, but English promoters will keep 

on getting it out of the something-for-nothing con- 
tingent in the same old way. 



Hearst's Boston paper is being much laughed at 
for printing a "scoop" that was directly the reverse 
of the truth. "Oh, yes,'' chuckles the loudest least 
editor, "but it was a great 'scoop.' " 

Women must not say "Good Heavens !" or "My 
Lord!" according to an Eastern band of W. C. T. 
Uters. Here's a chance for some inventor to put on 
the market a brand of smokeless profanity. 

With one of the Schmitz family temporarily di- 
vorced from a municipal salary, it behooves every 
job-holder not related to the administration to pay 
strict attention to his private morals. 

An administration which nobody outside its ranks 
thinks well of, is accused of planning to make Cap- 
tain Duke, Chief of Police. Meanwhile a boozy 
young hoodlum has almost made an angel of him. 



Our amiable President has been engaged in prov- 
ing that he is of Irish descent, which demonstrates 
conclusively that he does not intend to run again, 
and so is not caring a straw for the German vote. 

A bold man-o'-war's-man at Honolulu has been 
fined one dollar for killing a negro. Down goes an- 
other black mark against Roosevelt's name in the 
books which the sunny South is keeping. 

A Brooklyn man has given up food and is keeping 
fat and hearty on a diet consisting solely of milk 
punches — and this in the face of statistics that show 
how much danger lurks in the milk can ! 

A learned medico on the New York Board of 
Health urgently recommends the drowning of idiot 
children. We await the humanitarian who will add 
a clause providing for the painless removal of the 
idiot's parents. 

Harvard's new catalogue shows a falling off of 192 
students, but the remaining 5,565 should be able to 
keep the faculty from feeling over-lonesome. A 
thousand blossoms on an apple tree does not neces- 
sarily mean that there will be a thousand apples at 
gathering time. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



SOCIAL SCORIA IN THE SENATE. 
Another scandal has exploded at Sacramento with 
a noise like a bomb, and an odor like a rotten egg. 
It is too early to forecast the outcome of the investi- 
gation begun by the State Senate into the alleged 
turpitiire of four of its members, but we do not recall 
that any California Legislature has ever put one of 
its own number in the way of wearing stripes. 

In this case, however, the accused grafters may as 
well reckon on being ruined men, whether or not they 
get as far as the penitentiary. The charge against 
them is precise and explicit. The evidence which sup- 
ports it appears at this writing to be complete enough 
to leave their guilt in no moral doubt. Seemingly, 
they were so graft-hungry that they observed none 
of the accustomed precautions of the practised bood- 
ler. They doubtless felt — as they had license to feel 
— that their appointment on the so-called "Commit- 
tee on Commissions and Retrenchment" was in the 
nature of a letter-of-marque, permitting them to prey 
on all corporations and individuals. It is charged, 
and the charge will not be easy of disproof, that they 
had the express assurance of Hearst and his hired 
trust-busters, scandal-sniffers and corporation- 
wreckers that if they "handed it" to the Continental, 
they might do as they liked with other corporations 
suspected of owning a treasury surplus, without 
fear of criticism from the loud-mouthed Examiner. 
That arrangement may account in part for the in- 
caution displayed by the accused boodlers. Nobody 
will tax French, of San Francisco, with amateurish- 
ness in "practical politics;" Bunkers of San Francisco 
bred in the Ruef-Schmitz school, surely know better 
than to take traceable money; Emmons and Wright 
are from the interior, but neither of them is feeble- 
minded when it comes to collecting the dividends of 
applied statesmanship. They went at their business 
of "investigating" all the solvent corporations on 
the list as if they knew what they wanted, and how 
to get it. First, they hired private rooms in a quiet 
corner of Sacramento, and then they announced that 
their sessions would be secret, "except where the pub- 
lic interests demanded open sessions." This meant 
that the Continental would be turned inside out 
"coram publico," as the lawyers say, and that other 
concerns which did not feel like purchasing favorable 
reports might expect to be similarly dealt with. 

It is almost certain, as we have said, that French, 
Hunkers, Emmons and Wright will come out of the 
affair so branded as boodlers that they will never 
again be in a position to blackmail anybody or any- 
body's corporation. Beyond that, it is to be hoped 
that the daylight will be let into the Examiner's in- 
famous part in this detestable scheme. From ma- 
lignant hatred of Gavin McNab and Washington 
Dodge, based on the former's opposition to Hearst's 
idiotic political ambitions, this vampire of a news- 
paper set out to wreck every interest with which 
they were connected. It selected first of all the Con- 
tinental Building and Loan Association, indifferent 
to the fact that the wrecking of this admirable in- 



February 4, 1905. 

stitution meant the wiping away of the accumulated 
savings of thousands of the State's most desirable 
citizens. Broadside after broadside, the Examiner 
poured into this enterprise, but still it stood unim- 
paired. Then it went to the Legislature, and the 
black flag committee was the result of its labors. 

Who appointed French, Bunkers, Emmons and 
Wright on the special boodling committee — was it 
the President of the Senate? We hope he will be 
asked on the witness stand who it was that suggested 
these names to him ; who urged them for the places; 
who it was that first broached to him the matter of 
such a committee. 

Most likely the President of the Senate will be 
asked no such questions before the Senate committee, 
but the people of the State will not forget his part in 
making possible the corruption that has been laid 
bare, and they will not be satisfied until they have 
heard a clear statement from him. If he should talk, 
and should tell the whole truth, it will be discovered 
that the committee was framed up by agencies di- 
rectly controlled by the Examiner and manipulated 
by its hired "wrecking crew." The scandal is a 
matter that the State can afford to be grateful for. 
It may not send any of the crooked four to the San 
Quentin jute mill, but at least it is likely to put on 
record the knavery of a few grafters and expose ef- 
fectively the criminal methods that Hearst and his 
Hessians employ when they wish to accomplish the 
destruction of men too brave to be cowed and too 
honest to be bribed into submission to the base de- 
sires of the degenerate and perverted Examiner. 

ROUGH HOUSE DIPLOMACY. 

Mayor Schmitz has given it as his reason for dis- 
missing in a most humiliating manner Police Com- 
missioner Hutton — his own appointee — that the com- 
missioner devoted himself too assiduously to that 
branch of ornithology known along the tenderloin 
as "chippy chasing." There seems to be no doubt 
that Hutton is guilty ; he doesn't deny it to any ex- 
tent. But the public declines to believe that the real 
reason for the removal bore any relation to the im- 
morals of Hutton. It will not be surprised if it find 
Hutton's successor also an ornithologist, a chaser not 
of chippies but of eagles — the eagles on our metallic 
currency. 

Indefensible as Hutton is from the view-point of 
clean citizenship, which contemplates the elevation to 
office of none but men who have walked upright in 
private as well as in public life, it should not be for- 
gotten that the Mayor knew, or could and should 
have known, what manner of man he was before 
clothing him with the powers of a Police Commis- 
sioner." It is not true, and the Mayor does not pre- 
tend, that Hutton became suddenly immoral after he 
was given a job, although the associations and the 
methods of this administration are quite enough to 
corrupt the uncorrupted. 

This is distinctively a French restaurant adminis- 
tration. ( )ne such resort, where the decencies shrink 
and the prices swell with each floor of ascent, has 
long been the headquarters of the inner council of 
Schmitzism. Here the strategy board lias met at 
noon or at midnight to eat, drink and be thrifty. Here 
they have called perspective appointees to "stand 
them up" and determine who of them, excelling in 



February 4. 1905. 



unfit- ;,•> ha\< 

ncd the [Hilitics tli.it has 

It tli.it brought 

lluti with his shame. \\ hat would the 

private detectives learn 11 they watched the goings 
ami coinings of the other men who are battening on 
the city under this administration? How many of 
them lead lives that would bear such exposure as has 
revealed the iniquities of Hutton? 

But, private morals apart, let us see what kind of 
public morals Schmitz demands >>t' Ins commission- 
It has become public that among those t" whom 
Mutton's place was offered before it was vacant was 
Devoto, an Election Commissioner, now under ac- 
cusation by the Grand Jury of such wrong-doing in 

office as, in the opinion of that body, demands that lie 
be booted OUl of office. It will be recalled that when 

a recent Grand Jury lodged a similar accusation 
against Devoto and his colleagues, calling upon the 
Superior Court to turn them out of office, they met it 
with the technical plea in bar that the accusation 
should have been criminal in form. The present 
charge against these delectables contains no such er- 
ror. To the man in the street, it appears that the 
Mayor's removal of Hutton served a double purpose 
in publicly disgracing Hutton. and thus punishing 
him for thwarting his master's will, and at the same 
time in making a place for a man with a diploma 
showing bis proficiency in juggling with the law and 
the rights and liberties of the people. Thus, also, 
the Mayor put himself on a pedestal of private virtue 
so high that nobody will dream of posting a detective 
to note whether he ever climbs down from it. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

A THRILLING SCENE. 
Amid the waving of the red r 



GRAFTERS VS. VIGILANCE COMMITTEE. 

The Examiner seems to have always been in league 
with the looters and grafters who fatten on the public 
purse and the corruption funds of the corporations. 
Hearst, apparently^, always stood, kin to the cor- 
morant, with bared neck, ready to plunge his head 
into corporation corruption. Once before he was 
"caught with the goods." His acceptance of a $30,- 
000 bribe from the Southern Pacific Company, and 
his subsequent exposure, earned for that company 
his undying enmity. His next large attempt was an 
effort to take money from the pockets of the Realty 
Syndicate. That institution paid no attention to 
the blackmailer's efforts, and the charge was allowed 
to collapse. The latest is the terrible denunciation 
laid at the door of the Examiner of actually bribing 
four members of the Legislature. The proof seems 
conclusive, and we have treated of it at length in an- 
other column. 

We now point out the fact that there is no politics 
in graft, that fealty to party counts for nothing, and 
that the leopard never changes its spots, or the hyena 
its stripes. Dent Robert, as the personal representa- 
tive of the moral monstrosity who owns the Exami- 
ner, has out-yellowed his yellow boss, and in the at- 
tempt to corrupt the entire Legislature, has appar- 
ently had the favor and support of Mayor Schmitz 
and Abraham Ruef — thus the Grafters' League. The 
Examiner was "caught with the goods," and the next 
day it showed its hyena-like proclivities by a raging 
yellow laugh, in which it cries aloud : "Let no guilty 
man escape." 

There is a cure for these conditions, and it lies 
in the moral awakening of the people. The Vigilance 
Committee should be the executive arm of the aroused 
populace, and the offending journal and its pub- 
lisher should be banished forever from the com- 
munity. 



ttramt, no social convention 

-. "Blood for Blood" was sh< 
trum- shouted and fringed all about with tl 
of rhetorical rubbish by thai Sociali 

Prince of Agitators. Austin Lewis. I | 

.in anarchistic-socialistic protest against the adminis 
(ration ni the public concerns of the Empire of Kus. 
sia, and the one theme was "Down with the Czar!" 
"Blood for Bloodl" 

It was amusing to hear Lewis, ( olonel (?) I 
witzkj (the handle and nether end of bis nam 

a Kentuckyfied sound), Savilla and 1 izor des< 
the details of the St. Petersburg massacre, when 
every one in the house understood that all they knew 

"I the affair was gathered from the newspapers, 

whose "specials" wen- conspicuous for their contra 
dictions. I'.ut a vivid imagination found no difficult) 

in selecting the proper colors for the word painting, 
especially so with Lewis, who would dip his oratori- 
cal brush into a bucket of gore with the artistic grac. 
of a professional painter of waves of blood chasing 
one another across the ocean of Czarism to dash 
themselves against the rock-girt shores of happy 
anarchistic-socialism. And when Lewis reached the 
climax of his artistic effort, he stood mightier than an 
Ajax defying the lightning — though Lewis stood 
ten thousand miles away from the lightning's strik- 
ing point, he turned in a semi-circle to the right, then 
in a semi-circle to the left, and suiting action to the 
word, amid wild, tempestuous and cyclonic outbursts 
of thrilled idocy, jammed his sizzling brush into a 
freshly opened artery in the body Romanoff, and con- 
cluded his spectacular and pyrotechnic work of his 
rhetorical picture all in crimson by daubing above it 
in letters of fiery but straggling form, "Blood for 
Blood." Then the collection hat was passed. Expres- 
sions of love and sympathy, when cabled to foreign 
lands, cost money. 

Colonel Lockwitzky, "formerly an officer of high 
rank in Russia, but now an exile and refugee," was 
eloquent in forgetting to mention how it is that he is 
not in Russia this minute leading his revolutionary 
brethren to victory over the tyranny of Czarism.. Mr. 
Savilla, from Finland, told what he knew about it, 
as did Mr. Ozar from Poland. But Lewis, Austin 
Lewis, was the head and front of the "outpouring." 
He rose to dizzy heights on his combination ladder 
of gesticulation, sentence-weaving and skyrocket de- 
livery. Of course, the show was in a theatre — in a 
place dedicated to amusement. 

The Panama canal engineers differ so widely in 
the matter of a sea level canal or one with locks that 
not the first initial step towards construction has 
been taken, and may not be taken for months — or 
per.haps for a whole year. 

Another genius suggests that the Standard Oil 
Company be sued by some one of the railroads not 
in the "System" for a return of the rebates exacted 
for years, on the ground of extortion. He says this 
would make the said railroad popular. 

If the Legislature should provide for the crying 
of banns ten days before marriage, who would want 
to be a preacher or a Justice of the Peace in San Ra- 
fael? 



Hearst is beating the air and howling- as if in great 
pain because, as he alleges, President Roosevelt Las 
appropriated to his administration the yellow jour- 
nalist's anti-trust thunder. 



6 SAN FRANCISCO 

A PROLIFIC SOURCE OF DIVORCE. 

It is so easy to secure a divorce in the United 
States that a noted French writer has described it as 
"legalized prostitution." It is not difficult to con- 
ceive of a divorce granted for cause, but it is also 
susceptible of proof that many marry on whims, and 
divorces arc obtained so easily that whims may be 
repeatedly gratified. There are three authentic 
cases of women who are well in the public eye in Cali- 
fornia who have been divorced six times. One is only 
thirty-two years of age. These women are known 
among a certain class of men as "good fellows" and 
"good sports." They affect the race-track and claim 
and practice all the privileges and sins of the male 
"sport." 

The race-track has made ten per cent of the divorces 
in California. It is the inability to supply the demand 
for money that has thrown innumerable couples into 
the courts. It is the bad company met at the track- 
side that has haled many a heretofore happy couple 
to the inevitable separation. 

And, in the face of this and other causes for divorce, 
the clergy of the city, sane enough on most subjects, 
aims to make the laws more rigorous, and yet winks 
at the cause. We appeal to the manhood in the clergy. 
Doctor Clampett, you are a strong figure in the Epis- 
copal Church and a brave fighter for the Cross. Are 
you not making a mistake in selecting an individual 
and extraordinary case, that of Mrs. Tevis, to point 
your moral? Why not take the hundreds and hun- 
dreds of cases of marital misery caused by the race 
track, rather than the one case which does not find 
an exact parallel in the whole State? 

Reverend George W. White, you are an earnest 
thinker, and yet you fail to reach the sore in our 
body politic. You want to tinker with the laws. You 
say : "The laws of the State are simply rotten." Re- 
move the cause, dear doctor. The laws are all right. 
You get right in and demand that they be enforced. 
Obliterate the track and you will REMOVE THE 
CAUSE FOR TEN PER CENT OF THE DI- 
VORCES THAT CURSE THE STATE. If you 
could do this, would it not be a source of congratula- 
tion for you and the Reverend W. S. Matthews, the 
Reverend C. A. Bane, the Reverend Bovard and all 
the rest of you? And, by the way, apart from the 
question of divorce, there are a thousand other ills, ■ 
among them murder, prostitution, theft, breach of 
trust, forgery, arson, embezzlement and kindred 
felonies, directly traceable to the influence of the 
track. Why not seriously consider doing something 
to excise the cancer. We will give you our undivided 
and constant support, and be believe we can prom- 



NEWS LETTER. February 4, 1905. 

ise you the hearty co-operation of thousands in the 
State who are simply waiting for the leaders like 
yourselves to shake off the apathy and turn resolute- 
ly and seriously to the fulfilling of your duty to the 
municipality. "In Hoc Signo Vinces" — is there not 
among ye one that will raise the banner aloft and 
smite the hosts of the devil, or will ye skulk in your 
temples and maul glittering generalities into shape 
with the flowers of rhetoric, to the edification of 
your congregations? Here is a plain problem, an 
undeniable case easily reached, and will ye persist 
in not killing the snake? Will ye, by your silence, 
avoid the responsibility of hitting the rich? The 
Legislature is in session, and what are ye doing? 
Ye are sitting in your temples, idly watching the 
canker eating its way into the hearts of the people. 

THE FOUNDLING HOSPITAL. 

The death roll at the Foundling Hospital is big 
enough to be a matter of some concern to the citizens, 
and should appeal with particular force to the women 
of the community. It is true that the little waifs 
who are cared for in that place have really no business, 
to be here on this sphere at all, but law and morality, 
notwithstanding, they come as they have come ever 
since the memory of man or woman runneth not to 
the contrary. Seeing, therefore, that they are here, 
it would be well that they got every attention, and 
we are bound to confess that we think the present 
death rate at the hospital excessive. There is not 
the least complaint to be made with respect to the 
energy and care exercised by those who have charge 
of the institution, but there would seem to be some 
reason in the remark of one of the nurses that a 
larger staff and more room was required. At any 
rate, the present death rate is too high, that is ad- 
mitted on all hands. Some steps should be taken to 
grapple with the evil, for we do not want any damag- 
ing comparisons .instituted between the Foundling 
Hospital and a reconcentration camp. 

FAT FOLKS 

I reduced my weight seventy pounds, bust six Inches, waist 
six Inches, and hips fourteen Inches In a short time by a guar- 
anteed harmless remedy, without exercise or starving. I will 
tell you all about It. Enclose stamp. Address MRS. E. R. RICH- 
ARDS, 225 EAST NINTH ST., RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA. 




UCHAS. KLILUS & CO JJ 

&EXCL USIVTJb 
HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

For nineteen hundred and five, we have given 
special attention to the creation of our Spring and 
Summer Clothes, commanding patterns, distinguish- 
ed fabrics, and inimitable styles. 

If there exists any better clothes than offered here, 
we have never seen them. 



irO^jRJMy'STriRffi-E.Tr 



February 4. 1905. 



9AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



jj «aas,^^.r^' /TOWN CRIER 





£L*b 






The Board of Health of M«w York recommends 
the drowning of infant Idiotfe— Dally Paper. 

The little infant idiot 

Is an incubus too gteat 
To be carried ami provided fur. 

I'.v any modern State ; 
Y"ii cannot educate him. 

It is clear yon have to dbwn him. 

m>u catch the little beggar, 

And you take him out and drown hint. 

< 'fficials steal the taxes, 

But to keep a little child 
awfully expensive 

That economists get riled. 
Vet, if the town would flourish 

And increase its store of Wealth, 
The solution of the problem 

Is to drown the Board of Health, 

What sense of proportion is there in this continual 
persecution of the poor habitues of the dives, and the 
constant evidence of gingerly handling of influential 
and well-to-do knaves. Why do they not put the 
Mayor and the other scoundrels behind the bars. 
Evidence? There is evidence enough, if the proper 
people will just look tor it. 

Wonders never cease. We have discovered in the 
person of Dr. Johh W. Robertson, of Livermore, art 
expert alienist who refused to testify that a person 
was insane on demand. This is so unusual that we 
are compelled to inquire as to the amount of con- 
sideration offered. 

For a young man, Burrell G. White seems to be 
fairly sharp. Tine way in which he managed- to get 
hold of the Clunie business and to stick to it in spite 
of all detriment to Clunie's relatives is as great a 
tribute to his acquisitive ability as the conduct of 
the case is to Bridgeford's knowledge of the law. 

The preservation of game, which is exciting much 
interest at present is undoubtedly necessary, but it 
may be carried too far. Any atempt to restrict the 
sale of game except within strictly limited seasons 
is an interference with the liberty of the citizen which 
cannot be tolerated. 

The Fidelity Funding Company was too quick 
for a deputy sheriff the other day who attempted to 
levy on its funds. This is not surprising. The get- 
rich-quick concerns have so far proved too quick for 
the judiciary, so that the chances of a deputy- 
sheriff are necessarily somewhat remote. 

Coghlan, the Assemblyman, has developed into a 
full-fledged young epicurean. He has been the fore- 
most in advocating unreasonable increase in the sal- 
aries of officials, and puts his best foot foremost when- 
ever a junketing trip is under consideration. Luxury 
appeals naturally to some people. 

The entire testimony of Hart North and his at- 
titude on the Chinese cases, which deal with the im- 
portation of women for improper purposes, is very 
strange. It causes a wonder to arise whether tfofc 
gentle game of graft is confined altogether to the 
municipality. 

They talk of pitchforking Herbert Schmitz into the 
Board of Police Commissioners. We shall have to 
get Yorke to exorcise that Board, and then the 
devil, which he would leave, would be seven times 
worse than those of the present imps of hell. 



William Greer Harrison has appeared before the 
Committee of Public Morali at Sacramento. What 
a queer place for him to go, I low doei a Committee 
of Public Morals exist in thai Inferno. Next thing 
u e shall be reading of the devil holding a Bible- 
C'lasSi Harrison is all right, but he keeps wretched 
company. 

Graft — good Lord!— has grown so common thai we 
have ceased to hold "in doses, I ■ \ en the Methodists 
are appalled to find that the bearded saints can work 
theif own little discount orl the delights of Paradise, 

You cannot give a parson charge of a little book store 
but he sells yon out. What Would become of an ec- 
clesiastic oft the Boafd of Works. 

Another get of prizes has been offered to stimulate 
scientific research among women. Scientific re- 
ieseal'ch among wonlen is generally a very fine name 
for an altogether too common pruriency, and it is 
not pleasant to find that many women of Our Stale 
are intending to go into the competition, titlt for tin-' 
scientific glamour, it would be called mere nastinc'ss.- 

There has never been shown a more ludicrous 
spectacle than that of the Legislators in Sacramento, 
amid all the slime of the present Legislature, puzzling 
their heads how to deal with the divorce evil. God 
has punished hypocrites by depriving them of any 
sense of humor. 

Better prices for oranges are uplifting the heart 
of the gentle fruit-grower, Better oranges would 
meet our wishes. Forty Cents a dozen for the kind 
that they give us is a little of an imposition in an 
orange State. Oranges here are three times as dear 
as they are in London. 

Behind all the villainy and the fraud which is be- 
ing exposed, there lurks that slimy yellow monster, 
the Examiner. Every piece of corruption can be 
trailed unfailingly back to the business office of that 
paper. Robert figures, at present, as the yellow belly 
of the reptile. 

A State liquor tax, under proper restrictions, would 
not be a bad thing. But how in the name of all that 
is sensible, can we allow the people who hold office, 
and who administer our finances, to have charge of 
any such enterprise. It is a premium on graft. 

When a twenty-three-year-old bride brings charges 
of incompetence against her eighty-four-year-old 
husband, as was recently done in Oakland, it seems 
to be a little indelicate, to say the least. The chances 
are, however, that she is right. 

We shall hear very little about the victory which 
has been won by the United Railroads. The open 
shop has been recognized by consent, which simply 
means that the union has come to its senses and 
knows when it is licked. 1 

No greater farce has ever been perpetrated upon the 
public than the pretended zeal of Hearst on behalf of 
th old landmarks. The only landmark which he can 
understand, and with which he has any sympathy at 
all, is a road-house. 

The Board of Supervisors is to extend the swine 
limits. I should think so. They ought to be extended 
to include every official in the employ of the City 
Government. 

Mr. Hutton is a glutton, 
He also is a squeaker. 
Mr. Hutton cooked his mutton, 
And so did young Miss Keeler. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 4, 1905. 



fhe REFLECTIONS 

OFA Knocker 




/•"Ry John Kendrick^Rangs. 

c<fy,[ght by K+f.+Mmee, iono4_-. 

ON PROGRESSIVE MATRIMONY. 

"I tell you. Redface." said the Knocker, as he en- 
ured the Growlers the other day, "there is at least 
one man of sense and courage in this sneaking old 
world of ours — a man without pretense, with ideas 
that are not confounded by any of the foolish conven- 
iions of society, and the nerve to promulgate them." 
Idas he anything to lose?" asked Redface. 

"Bosh! You old pessimist!" retorted the Knocker. 
"Anything to lose — I guess he has. His name is 
George .Meredith, and he attacks no less an institu- 
tion than that modern tyranny, that latter-day sla- 
very known as matrimony." 

"< )li. he does, does he." laughed Redface. "Well, 
he has got nerve. Pretty bad business that, for a 
novelist, I think, don't you? If you knock out mat- 
rimony, you stamp out population, and if you haven't 
g t any population, who the deuce is going to buv 
the books your novelists write?" 

"He doesn't stamp out population." said the 
Knocker. "Chances are he'll improve its quality if 
i e succeeds in putting his plan through. He doesn't 
advocate the abolition, but the regulation, of mar- 
riage, in a way which strikes me as most effective. 
He wants the matrimonial contract to be limited to a 
term of years, instead of being a life sentence." 

"With what object?" 

"Well, first to promote happiness; and second, to 
abolish the divorce evil. For my part. I think it's a 
magnificent scheme, though it seems to me that ten 
years is too long a term. He ought to make it seven, 
at the outside. Science tells us that we humans 
change completely every seven years, so that on the 
mere ground of morality alone two people who have 
been married in njoo ought to be either freed or re- 
married in 1907. They are not the same people, you 
see. and not having been parties to the original con- 
tract, they should not be bound by it, nor can they 
with entire propriety continue to live together. But 
entirely apart from this moral aspect of the case, how 
much better it would be for the world if an irksome 
alliance, that is gradually driving the man to drink, 
and turning the woman's hair to gray and furrowing 
her brow with wrinkles, should expire by the pro- 
visions of a limited contract. Just take the case of 
poor old Billie Sassafras, for instance. Has Mrs. 
; - afras turned out to be the wife he contracted for. 
and las f'.illie turned out to be the husband she 
contracted for? I guess not. When he married her, 
she was a slender, tender, simple little thing who 
ii ought one new dress a season was the height of 
luxury, and a seat in the front row of the Balcony 
Circle at a matinee the seventh Heaven of delight. 
Xow it's ten expensive creations a winter the lady al- 
lows herself, theatre tickets twice a week in the best 
orchestra seats, and a box at the opera everv Mon- 
day night. Instead of a runabout and a single cob 
to carry her hither and von, the lady now demands a 
brougham, with a footman on the box for her shop- 
ping, and an automobile with a chauffeur and an as- 
sistant gas man to take care of the engines for her 



touring, and a swell Victoria, with a pair of prancing 
steeds for Park use. The slender tenderness and ten- 
der slenderness that first caught Billie's fancy has de- 
veloped into a portly shortliness and embonpoint 
that is overwhelming, and the sparkling eye that used 
to watch for his coming in the old courtship days, has 
now a cold and glassy severity about it that puts 
Billie on the defensive every time he goes home. 
Gad ! I don't wonder Billie is all the time whistling 
'The Girl I Left Behind Me' wherever he goes." 

"Well, I guess Mrs. S. has something to say on her 
side. She married Billie, and at the end of two years 
she found she'd taken his mother and two sisters and 
three maiden aunts and his brother into the bargain," 
said Redface. 

"I didn't say she hadn't," retorted the Knocker. 
"Of course, she has something on her side. Billie 
isn't the man she married, any more than she is the 
woman Billie married. It's positively immoral for 
them to go qn living together; they're both so differ- 
ent. Billie was a gay. light-hearted, whole-souled 
youngster with mighty few vices and prettv nearly 
all the virtues. To-day he has few virtues and pretty 
near all the vices. The man who used to call upon her 
loaded with flowers and bon-bons, now comes 
home loaded to the muzzle with cocktails and high- 
balls and other things. The little jokes he used to 
crack about life, that made her feel that an eternity 
passed with him would be all sunshine, have become 
dull, cynical insinuations that eithtr wound her 
into silence or irritate her into a retort in kind, and 
her prospects for future happiness is about as great 
as the prevailing expectation of good skating weather 
in Hades. And what is the remedy for all this? The 
Divorce Courts, with all the beastly notoriety they 
involve, and in this particular case even at that a 
luxury beyond their means to indulge in — but that 
seven years contract! Ah. that would have been a 
blessed relief for both, and blest if I don't think it 
would have brought them together again." 

"Brought em together again?" laughed Redface. 
"Really, Knocker, my boy, how the devil does a re- 
lease bring people together again?" 




HELLER & FRANK 
C L 6 IHI "e'rS 

Are showing 

a large and 

varied assortment 

of PARAGON 

TROUSERS 

MARKET STREET 
AND GRANT AVENUE 




Febnury 4. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



the Knocker. "1 ven- 
t-ar contract ■ ilt in 

at tin- end "i four years of married life, m>h felt that 

'. a renewal of your seven years' con- 

■11 t.i begin your courtship all over 

he mere fact that the relation was not a per- 

nt "111 would make it necessary for you t" goon 

behavior early in the game to keep it go- 

the notion that in three years more your wife 

would he free t'> marry your friend Jones, "r to elope 
with your cousin Jim. "r to llirt with your rieli friend 
Wilkins, would put you on your mettle. You'd I"- 
ill get out. and the chances are that 
you'll take such a brace that on the renewal day 
other chaps wouldn't he in it with you. The 
fact is. that these renewable contracts would perforce 
introduce a little more courtship into married life. 
thereby adding to its piquancy at least, if not con- 
tributing to its lasting happiness. It's only because 
we are sure of things that we allow ourselves to 
lapse into a contemptuous attitude toward them, and 
ms to me that if wives felt that some other 
woman might run off with their husbands, or hus- 
bands were made to fear that possibly after a long; 
period their wives would marry some other man. 
both would make a stronger effort to make them- 
selves pleasing to each other." 

"And how about the children?" demanded Redface. 

"There are no children any more." said the 
Knocker. "There are babies, but no more children. 
Under modern conditions, infancy is followed by a 
period of little old man and womanhood that has en- 
tirely done away with the institution of childhood. 
The youngsters would have their parents for seven 
years, and after that would shift for themselves, as 
most of 'em do now. I tell you, Redface, it's a 
splendid plan, that seven-year term, and it's me for 
it. I shan't marry until it is an established fact." 

"Good," said Redface, rising. "Under the circum- 
stances, I congratulate your wife." 



■ -o<o<o • 



Wedding Invitations. 

We give special attention to prevailing forms, and 
engrave visiting cards, wedding initations and an- 
nouncements, correctly and reasonably. Monograms, 
crests and address dies made to order. C. E. Gold- 
smith, the engraver, is now with us, which insures 
a continuance of the very best work that the en- 
graver's art can produce. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 
Market street. 



Gas Bills Reduced. 

By making a small monthly charge for the use of 
our Regulator, we reduce your bills and keep your 
tips, burners and lights in good condition. Gas Con- 
sumers' Association, 455 Sutter street. 'Phone Main 
717- 

Old King Cole was a merry old soul, 
And this merry old soul was frisky, 

He called for his pipe and he called for his bowl, 
And he called for OLD KIRK whiskey. 

There are a number of Japanese stores, so-called, 
in San Francisco, but if you wish the real article, it is 
better to patronize George T. Marsh & Co., who 
makes a specialty of Japanese art goods. 

Oysters are best during the months with an "R" 
in the name, but if you desire a choice steak or shell- 
fish of any kind, go to Moraghan's Oyster Stalls, 
California Market. 




The Honor of the 

GRAND PRIZE 

at the St. Louis Exposition was awarded 

Hunter 
Whiskey 



For the highest order-of merit in all 
the elements of a perfect whiskey. 



HILBERT MERCANTILE CO., 

13G-144 Second Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Exchange 313 



Murphy, Grant & Co. 

Importers of staple and fancy dry goods. Manufacturers of 
furnishing goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of 
"THE NETER-BIP" OVERALL. The best in the world. 

Gloves, suspenders, laces, ribbons, dress goods, velvets, 
silk, flannels, oil cloths, cottons, 'mens, etc. Blankets, 
calicoes, umbrellas, cutlery, shawls, notions, smokers' 
articles, stationery, underwear, hosiery, white goods. 

Cor. Sansome and Bush Sts., S. F. 





For Breakfast 
For Breakfast 
For Breakfast 


wJSZQ%%m 





SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

U/>e Squipper of Constantino 

A BALLAD. 



January 28, 1905. 



I 

"What lio!" quoth the squipper of Constantino. 

"What ho! can't you hear me canorting? 
Vuu glubber get swize, in the uppcr-loft skies, 

Ur I'll teach you with whom you're cavorting." 

II 
The glubber glibs glip to the mizzen-mast tip 

While the squipper he watches him wiercely. 
He squattles his eye, till the very sparks fly 

And the glubber he quivers astiercely. 

Ill 
O splassinger pause, at this terrible cause 

Of the fate of the ship Constantinopo, 
For had he not said : "Ten pounds for his head !" 

The ship would have reached Askidopo. 

iV 

The glubber looked down, with a herrible frown 
At the squipper below in the clabbord, 

And pulling a knife, he waved it arife : 
"Revenge on the squipper!" he jabbered. 

V 
The squipper then sneered: "You think I'm afeered! 

'Ells 'ounds, come down and I'll welp ye!" 
"You will if you can," the glubber began, 

"But the fo'castle middy will 'elp me." 

VI 
Then up from the deep, like one who's asleep, 

The fo'castle middy comes- prancing; 
"I had a bad cold," he afterwards told, 

"But nevertheless I was dancing. 

VII 
"For I felt in me heart, the squipper would start 

When he saw the brutiny open, 
With the glubber and me on top of the tree 

And the slailors around in the go-pen. 

VIII 
"And rightly I guessed, a fair 'eaven blessed 

The glubber and me in the plabberd, 
For all of the crew most graciously flew, 

Assisting me on with me scabbard. 

IX 
"Three times round the ship I wiercely did skip 
Till I staused at the squipper and grabbed him. 
.Then the glubber ripped down from the mizzen-mast 
crown, 
And pulling a scutless he stabbed him." 

X 

Alas for the squipper of Constantino, 
(The squipper so given to brasting), 

He fell on his back, near the mizzen-mast shack, 
And now is in 'eaven or rasting. 

XI 
Then the middy he sklope to a big calliope, 

And the crew played ball with a rubber. 
The little bing ting sat up in the swing 

And the boatswain made love to the glubber. 



Are you a good judge of good whiskey? Try OLD 
KIRK. It's A. P. Hotaling & Co.'s best on the mar- 
ket. 



For your protection remember lh«t 
every bottle of the genuine 



Vve. CLICQUOT 

CHAMPAGNE 

imported direct from France bears the 
additional label 



^AVIGNIER-G>- 

1 IV^'-.'.i L\ ■ SAN FRAMCI5CO- 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC- COAST. 



This incomparable French Champagne 
is especially prepared to suit the taste 
of the American market. 

Refuse Stibstitules 



A REWARD OF $1,000 

will be paid for a case of 

WRINKLES. FRECKLES. BIRTH MARKS. 
MOLES, MOTH PATCHES. SMALLPOX PIT. 
TINQS. PIMPLES, TAN, SUNBURN, ACNE. 
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR, PORT WINE MARKS 

and all Facial Blemishes that I 
accept for treatment and fail to 
cure : : : : 

YOU CAN BE BEAUTIFUL 

DR. W C. SCHLEY. Dermatologist 
School, 141 Powell St. S. F. Store. 229 Powell St: 




BLAKE, MOFFITT S TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

Blake, Moffltt & Towns. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Blake, McPall & Co., Portland Oregon. 
TEL. MAIN 199. 65-57-59-61- FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses 
U«*i»cllao' aundrles ' paper-hangers, printers, painters 
DrU3llcS'' illi:tri1 tables, brewers, book-binders, candy- 
makers, canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries. 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 

Buchanan Brothers 
Brush Mfts., 609 Sacramento St., S. F., Tel. Main 5611 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and commission merchants. 
General agent* 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

Gillingham Cement 

MarKet Street, cor. Fremont 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

433 Post street, between Powell and Mason 
San Franoisco. Tel. Main 1323. 

E. BRIDGE. Proprietor. 




BUSWELL COMPANY 



636 Clay Street 



Bookbinder. Pnper-rulnr. Printer and Blank 
P.ook Manufacturer 



February 4. 190s. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




LEASU BUgS WAfJ D 




l-nis, and in the third place,. if I over bad .1 man as 
: aa Charles Jackson, I would dischargi him at 

the first available opportunity, wherein I see in 
getting into trouble with Mr. Jackson. However, I 
am going to take my chances, for a brighter, quicker 
little performance 1 haven't seen in a long tim< . The 
play is clean-cut. jolly, refreshing from start to finish. 
It is full of bright lines, given with a spontaneity by 
bright people. It is headed by an exceedingly bright 
man, who will, before he is many years older, gi\r to 
the stage — the American stage — the beneficial know- 
ledge of the "whys and wherefores." 
* * * 

If any one, and I suppose there are some fools in 
the world, have ever had any doubt regarding Miss 
Lillian Lawrence's capabilities as an actress, the 
doubt must have, of necessity, vanished into thin 
air after seeing her finished performance on Monday 
night last, as the manicurist Sophy Fullgarncy in 
Arthur W. Pinero's very clever comedy, "The Gay 
Lord Ouex." Miss Lawrence has been very ill, and 
her recovery is not yet complete, but however great 
the strain may have been on the night I saw her, she 
gave no sign of it. It was a performance that im- 
pressed me; first, for its all-round wortlv and sec- 
ond, for its well-thought-out conception. It con- 
firmed my belief that the Alcazar, or any other thea- 
tre, will have to travel a long way before securing 
such a capable actress as Miss Lawrence has proved 
herself to be. It takes time, study, hard work and 
faithful toil to arrive at the head of the theatrical 
ladder, and it seems to me that just these enumera- 
tions that I, in my very humble way, have set forth, 
Miss Lawrence must have always kept studiously 
before her, the result being capability and a trueness 
that is real and genuine. 

They tell me that actresses are born, not made. 
This is a fallacy. A woman with intuitiveness breaks 
the ground with the trowel of knowledge, and forces 
and cements her way to success. Lacking that in- 
tuitiveness, she fails. 

Pinero's play, "The Gay Lord Quex," you all know, 
because you have, most of you, seen it before, here in 
San Francisco, when another company played it. I 



Juliet Crosby, leading lady Central Theatre. 
* * * 

Did you ever read "Three Men in a Boat?" Well, 
of course you all have. I'll take that for granted. 
My programme told me on Tuesday night that Chas. 
Frohman presented William Collier in Davis' farce, 
"The Dictator." So he does. In this boat of mine, 
however, are two others, Charles Jackson, alias "Jim" 
Dodd, valet to "Steve" Hill, alias William Collier, 
and Charley Hayne, wireless telegraph operator for 
Red C. Line, personified by John Barrymore, and 
perhaps you think these three don't keep things 
humming! In the first place, Collier talks so fast 
that I had to keep my two ears and an extra one 
open to catch the clever jabs he was throwing at 
the other fellows. In the second place, Barrymore 
talks in such a low, quiet, don't-give-a-continental 
way that I had to lean forward to catch his quixotic- 

The ballad entitled "The Squipper of Constantino" on page 10 of this 
issue is by Philip B. Anspaeher. [ 




Mahogany dining tables of mas- 
sive construction. Other dining 
room pieces to match. At 




Geary Street at Union Square 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. February 4> 1905. 

trust, be, and I know it will be, a source of satisfac- 
tion to the man who has given his best — a great best 
— to those that shall come after him. The play of 
"The Bonnie Brier Bush" is fragrant with a sweet- 
ness that Mr. Stoddart has extolled and marked as his 
own. His company gives him very sterling support. 
It seemed like old times to hear Reuben Fax's voice. 
As "Posty," he can take you quicker across the water 
to old Scotland than the fastest greyhound ever float- 
ed. If Mr. Stoddart has decided to retire, our Stage- 
land, while regretting, will wish him happiness and a 
great content, in that he has given us pleasure im- 
measurable. 

* * * 

James V. Macdonald, late comedian of "Sultan 
ofSulu" and "King Dodo," you will find most ac- 
ceptable this week at the Orpheum. He is not only 
a good raconteur, but he has a voice that will meet 
with your approval. He sings three songs, each of 
them clever and catchy, and he spins funny, and in- 
cidentally, new, yarns in a very quiet way that makes 
hi;- turn one to be looked forward to. 

In Fred Houlihan, John and Bertha Gleeson have 
an exceedingly good accompanist and a pianist of 
merit. They themselves, if they would leave the 
singing part out, are dancers of no mean order. The 
Prosper troupe, European acrobats, are skilled ar- 
tists in their line, and bring to a close a very inter- 
esting ( )rpheum performance. 

Cressy, 1 believe by request, gave us "Town Hall 
To-Night," I think the best of the trio that he has 
presented. The house seemed to appreciate it just 
as much as they did when he gave it three weeks ago, 
and that's saying a whole lot. For dry humor and 
clever, witty sayings, give me Cressy, with Blanche 
Davne to carry out the ideas. 

The "Carter De Haven Sextette" is going with 
more snap this week, and was cordially received on 



Marv Young, the dainty comedienne, who was in 
Augustin Daly's famous New York Company, and at 
the Castle Square in Boston, and has now joined the 
stock company at the Alcazar. 

am antagonistic when comparisons are at issue, as a 
rule, yet, believe me, this presentation bears them. 
The third act you will find very carefully and well 
carried out. It is, as a matter of fact, the act of the 
play, and during this act you will see Miss Lawrence 
and jMr. Craig at their best. 

"Du reste ; a great deal of credit must be given 
to Miss Adele Belgarde for her clever presentation 
of the Duchess of Strood, a presentation that was 
impressive as it was sincere. In Chichester Frayne, I 
found Mr. Maher not only well up to his part, but 
dressed to it. and as long as I am on curtain lectures, 
I may as well say now, because I will say it later, 
anyway, that it is just as necessary for a man to 
dress well, which means correctly, on the stage, as it 
is off it, and if he doesn't, the fellow that does, pro- 
viding he has the intellect, shows up best. 
* * * 

1. H. Stoddart, the dean of our world theatrical, 
gave to me on Wednesday night the same impres- 
sion, personified, of course, that he gave me in this 
self-same play, "The Bonnie Brier Bush," some years 
ago ; namely, the great knowledge of the country on 
which the play is built. Mr. Stoddart, I understand, 
has come out to our coast to give us, for one week, 
his impersonation of Lachlan Campbell, and to bid 
us farewell. How well Mr. Stoddart has served the 
American stage, it is not necessary for me to say. 
The pleasure that he has given to his audiences for 
vcars, and their realization of a noble worth, will, I 




The Chutes Theatre u .. ..ounces for next week a 
clever skit called "Matrimonial Mishaps," in which 
Mr. ami -Mrs. John T. Chick appear. The above 
picture is a good likeness of this sketch team. 



February 4. 1905. 

["he < »rphenra shows iusl now arc 

■trh. ami arc well worth the 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



"3 




. 



OrpheurT). 

tig Sunday Matirn* 

A STUPENDOUS SHOW 



Jultlff 
llr .there; S>w.-ll ini-l Nlblo: II .11 , 
Troupe :li"im 

CARTER DE HflVEN SEXTETTE 

Matineea *u.-r> Wednesday. ThurRday. Haturriny find Sunday 
PrkNM 1". » and ft"o. 



Columbia Tbeatre. UoTT ' ■ KSAS Mmm 

Tonight. Sunday nlghl ■ndallneil week. Ifatlneee Saturday 
rlea Prohman presents 

WILLIAM COLLIER 

In Rlchanl Harding Davis hice 

THE DICTATOR 

Monday Feb 13th— Lawrence D'Orsny In 
"The Earlot Pawtiiclifiic." 



Alcazar Theatre 



Belabco a Mayer. Proprietor* 
E. D. Pbio*. Gen'l. Mgr. Tel. Alcaier 



One week commencing Monday February 6. 

Kegular matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

Tbe Alcazar Htock Company in the furiously funny fare* 

ARE YOU A MflSONj? 

Thursday afternoon Feb- 9, 

Special matinee, Ibsen's dramatic abnormalily 

GHOSTS 

With Barry Mestayer and Lillian Lawrence. 
Monday Feb. 13.— H«nry Arthur Jones' great play. 
THE MIDDLEMAN. 
Evenings 2BC. to 76c. Matinees 25c. to 60c. 



CeQtral Theatre. 



Belasco & Mayer, proprietors 
Market St., near 8th, Phone South 633 



The above is a portrait in costume of Minnie Niblo, 
of Newell & Niblo, xylophone, violin and saxophone 
experts, at the Orpheum. 

* * * 

Creatore is the embodiment of the romance of 
batonage, and his band shows the wonderful ability 
he has of bringing out the ensemble effect. The Al- 
hambra is almost too small a hall for so great an ag- 
gregation of players, and the volume of sound rever- 
berates through the confined space like the chronicled 
trumpets of Jericho. 

ik * * 

The Alcazar will again resound with merriment 
next Monday, when the riotously funny farce, "Are 
You a Mason?" will receive its first production by 
any stock company. It has attracted crowds in the 
higher-priced houses, but has never had a prettier 
stage setting than the Alcazar will give it. The long- 
deferred special matinee of Ibsen's "Ghosts" will posi- 
tively be given next Thursday afternoon. 

* * * 

The Chutes is gaining ground all the time, and the 
theatrical entertainment grows in quality and quan- 
tity. Macdonald, the artistic raconteur and singer, 
holds forth for next week, and those who enjoyed him 
at the Orpheum will enjoy the repetition of the dose. 
Ahern and Baxter are equilibrists and acrobats, and 
Mr. and Mrs. John T. Chick will entertain with their 
original sketches. The Johnstown Flood is instructive 
and should be visited by school children. 

(Continued to Page 25.) 



Beginning Monday Feb. 6. Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

A FIGHT FOR MILLIONS 

Prices evening 10c to 60o. Matinees 10c, 16c, 26c. 

Tivoli Opera House. °° rner ^a.'^stre.u 

Performances at 8 sharp. 

In order to accommodate thou *ands of music lovers who have 
been unable to see the performances of GHAKD 01 EfcA at the 
Tivoli, the management announce an extension of the season 
for a period of TWO "WEEKS. 

GRAND OPERfl 

In Italian 
Reserved seats now on sale. Prices, $2, $1.60, $1, 60c. 



;fllhan)bra Theatre 



Direction Gottlob, Marx & Co, One night, one matinee. 
Tuesday night Feb. 7th. Saturday matinee Feb. llth. 

MELBA 

And her company. 

Seats now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co. 

Prices $4. $3, $2, $1. 



Graod Opera House 



Next Monday night. Feb. cth. Every night including Sunday. 
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday. A stupendous and gorge- 
ous riut of fun. melody and beauty. 
Klaw and Erlanger's mighty beauty spectacle 

MOTHER GOOSE 

Cast and ensemble of 350. Joseph Cawthorn, W. H. Macart, 
Neva Aywar. Harry Kelley, Corinne. Ciiftou Crawford, Edith St. 
Clair, w. Stanton, Edith Hutchine. Allen Kamsay. Dawes, Sey- 
mour, The Grigolatis Aerial Ballet, etc. 

Prices— Orchestra, $1.60 and $2.00; dress circle, $1.60; family cir- 
cle, 76c and $l.oo; gallery 50c. 

£?fter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the 
theatre is over. 



PL AY^^AYQ 

I ""ENTERTAINMENTS ■ ^gfF 



'S-PI 

AND 

■ENTERTAINMENTS 

Catalog of thousands sent Free! Tree! Free! 
Aidrtit SAM'L FRENCH, 52 W. 22d St., New York 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

€T/?e James Flood Building' 



February 4, 1905. 



The James Flood Building, fronting on Market 
Eddy, Powell and Ellis streets, is completed, and rap- 
idly being occupied. The structure and its location 
form a conspicuous addition to the architectural 
strength and attractiveness of San Francisco; be- 
sides, the building compares favorably with any in 
America. The style is what is called the modern 
classic, which includes the more artistic and sub- 
stantial features of the Renaissance building art, and 
the imposing solidity that modern invention and dis- 
covery in building materials give to large structures. 
The building proper has an elevation of 185 feet, with 
twelve stories and basement, steel framed and built 
of concrete, terra-cotta and Colusa sandstone, with 
bases of polished granite, while the wood throughout, 
as well as the trimmings, are in mahogany finish. 
The basement is to be occupied as a high-class cafe, 
and when its doors are opened to the public, it will 
be found to be about the best-appointed cafe in the 
United States. The ground floor is arranged for 
stores, banks and safe deposit vaults. The second 
story is designed expressly for commercial enter- 
prises. The ten upper stories are divided into 700 
superb, light and airy offices, each floor and every 
room being equipped with all modern conveniences, 
including electric light, gas, steam heat and tele- 
phone service of the most improved kind. The site 
and the building are a distinguishing mark of the 
enterprise of Mr. James Flood. 

But while this stately edifice speaks for itself ot 
its stability and attractiveness, it is due to those who 
contributed to and participated in its construction, 
fittings and ornamentation to mention wherein they 
supplied materials, mechanical skill and artistic taste 
to the erection, rounding out and completion of this 
marvelously picturesque perfection in architectural 
design and building trades' art. 

Thus, the splendid and attractive outer walls are 
of Colusa sandstone, which long since was recognized 
all over the Pacific Coast as possessing in an unusual 
degree every quality required in building stone for 
durability, distinguished appearance and easy of or- 
namentation. It is these qualities in the Colusa stone 
that commands the attention and admiration of the 
exterior of the James Flood Building, and contrac- 
tor McGilvray, who supplied the stone, has reason to 
be proud of the building's presentation, because the 
walls will continually tell the story of the superiority 
of the Colusa stone in retaining a fresh look and re- 
sisting power against wind and weather. 

The concrete and artificial stone materials were 
supplied, it is almost needless to say, by the George 
Goodman Artificial Stone Company. The product of 
this company's works has long been the standard of 
quality that is required in the erection of large build- 
ings and sidewalks, and it is not surprising that it is 
everywhere in demand. 

Among the more attractive of the mechanical art 
is to be seen in the terra-cotta work of Gladding, Mc- 
Bean & Co., Rialto Building. The inside court is of 
glazed terra-cotta and brick, which reflect a flood of 
light to the surrounding rooms and offices, to say 
nothing of the charming effects which this 'work 
produces. It almost bewilders one to stand in the 
mellow glare of these glazed designs in terra-cotta. 
But this well-known firm also exercised its skill in 
fire-proofing by its perfected system of hollow tiling, 
which, though hidden from view, is a most essential 



feature of this palatial business and office building. 

The fronts of the stores and the grills attract a 
great deal of attention and admiration on account of 
their completeness and stability. The store fronts 
are particularly attractive, and this fact is attested 
by the commendations of the passing crowds. 

The plumbing, sanitary engineering and steam-fit- 
ting was accomplished by W. F. Wilson & Co., 328- 
330 Stockton street. In this work, they introduced 
the Dunham system of drainage, and the latest me- 
chanical discoveries by sanitary science. They lined 
with marble the lavatories and toilet rooms, and, in 
fact, spared no expense to make this particular work 
the most complete in the United States. They also 
put in the Webster system of steam heating through- 
out the building, including the stores and the cafe. 
The notable feature of this system of heating is, that 
the distribution of heat is not by pressure, but by 
vacuum, which insures safety and a steady tempera- 
ture. 

The almost miles of tiling were placed by the well- 
known firm of W. W. Montague & Co., No. 309- 
317 Market street, and so perfectly was the work 
done that it looks like one long and unbroken tile 
from start to finish, and the materials used were 
so flawless, that so long as the building stands, the 
tiles will give perfect service. 

"Do the best job that can be done," were the or- 
ders to J. H. Keefe, the artist, painter and decora- 
tor, who has removed his office and shop from 
317 Sutter street to 425-426 Taylor street. Flow well 
Mr. Keefe obeyed orders may be seen in the mirror- 
like polishing, artistic decorations and harmonious 
colorings. It is certain that his work in the James 
Flood Building could not be improved upon by any 
one. 

The refrigerating plant which the Vulcan Iron 
Works, 505 Mission street, placed in the cafe in the 
basement of this building, is constructed by a system 
that gives the desired temperature without the 
slightest variation from day to day. It is a mar- 
vel in ingenuity, as an Arctic region maker. 

In the matter of quickly reaching any desired floor, 
provisions are ample. The Otis Elevator Company, 
509 and 511 Howard street, have put in 8 passenger 
elevators and one freight lift, each one having the 
benefit of the very latest designs and improvements 
in house elevator service that insures rapid move- 
ment, safety and comfort. In putting in their ele- 
vator machinery, great care was taken that it should 
be as complete and perfect as mechanical skill could 
make it, but, for that matter, the Otis Elevator is 
always the possessor of the public's confidence, be- 
cause it is constructed for quick service and immunity 
from accidents. 

And, finally, the basement — the cafe, the to-be aris- 
tocratic and swell restaurant, in all California! Large 
fans will draw fresh air continually from the top of 
the building, when it will be filtered and given the 
proper temperature and forced to all parts of the 
cafe. By a special fan, all kitchen odors will be 
thrown directly to the outside. The furnishings will 
be sumptuous and inviting, and what is more, an 
electric fountain will present a rare spectacle in 
blended colors and bursts of glaring lights. As for 
the cuisine, well, just consult the menu. That's all — 
except that the tableware is in exquisite artistic de- 
sign, as is the silver, and the service will more than 
satisfy the most exacting. 



February 4. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»5 




ORNAMENTAL IRON STORE FRONTS AND BANK 

Executed by the Hecla Iron 

To the Hecla Iron Works of Brooklyn, New York, 
much credit is due for the excellence displayed in the 
execution of the ornamental metal work installed 
by that firm, in the James Flood Building, of this city. 
The artistic metal work of this well known firm, plays 
no minor part in lending architectural beauty to 
the admirable . structure that it adorns, for it not 
only extends from the first to the third floors upon 
the outside of the edifice, but the metal wrought into 
stairs and elevator grilles of elaborate design, are to 
be found within, on all of the 12 floors of the build- 
ing, from basement to roof. The ornamental metal 
work executed by the Hecla Iron Works includes 
the duplex copper-plated metal store fronts and bank- 
corner, the bronze elevator enclosure grilles, elevator 
cages, stairs from the second to twelfth floors, bronze 



CORNER OF THE JAMES FLOOD BUUDING. 
W'orks, of Brooklyn, New York. 

doors, bronze window casings in the main corridor on 
the first floor, and the bronze doors and register pan- 
els. Although the plant of the Hecla Iron Works, 
which is the largest of its kind in this country, is in 
Brooklyn, New York, that firm has acquired a license 
to erect its artistic metal work within the confines 
of California, and through its agent, Mr. Edwin R. 
Jackson, of No. 228 First street, this city, has already 
given lucrative employment 'to mechanics and arti- 
sans in this, and other cities of California. 

Structures of other cities of the Pacific Coast have 
been adorned by handiwork in bronze and other 
metals from the Hecla's shops, yet that firm's greatest 
achievements, in ornamental metal work, are to be 
found- in the large cities of the Eastern States. 

Among the most recent work of note, installed by 




BRONZE ELEVATOR 



ENCLOSURE GRILLES. IN THE MAIN CORRIDOR OF THE JAMES FLOOD BUILDING. 

Executed by the Hecla Iron Works, of Brooklyn, New York. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 4, 1905. 



the Hecla Iron Works, was the ornamental metal 
work in the magnificent new Hotel St. Regis, owned 
by Colonel John Jacob Astor, in New York City, and 
also the artistic metal work in and about the stations 
of New York's Subway. 

Ihe bronze and gloss marquise, extending nearly 
the entire length of the 55th street side of the Hotel 
St. Regis, is claimed to be, by competent judges, the 
finest marquise in the world, while the kiosks, or iron 
and glass entrances to the Subway's stations, pre- 
sent a feature in the commercial use of ornamental 
metal work to be found in no other city of this coun- 
try. 

An auction sale of unusual importance is to take 
place Tuesday, February 28th, at noon, at the sales- 
rooms of G. H. Umbsen & Co., 20 Montgomery street. 
The southwest corner of Market and Eleventh streets 
will be sold by order of Henry P. Umbsen, sole 
referee. This property fronts 275 feet on Market 
street and 275 feet on Eleventh street. The assessed 
valuation for 1904-1905 is $307,356, with a gross ren- 
tal of $864. 



To lease for six months (possibly sell) finest 
twelve-room corner residence ; best location, Ala- 
meda. Every modern convenience ; street cars pass 
door; railroad stations near; satisfactory terms to 
responsible party. Address C. B. Warrand, Post 
Office, Alameda. 



After the theatre, it is the correct thing to spend an 
hour at Cafe Zinkand, where the choicest of viands 
may be enjoyed while listening to the music of a 
select orchestra. 



There is no pleasure without OLD KIRK whiskey. 
It is Hotaling's best on the market. 

Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 
for $7.50 per ton; half ton ?1; quarter ton $2. Use Briquettes for 
cooking and heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 





Die champagne 
of perfection. 
Essential to the 
enjoyment of* 
any function 
HUBERT 
MERCANTILE 0- 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

VWGaaMlSpecialAd? 
San Francisco. 




Something New 
is always happening in a poker game — two deuces 
take the pot, etc. We have all the latest novelties in 
playing cards, poker chips, counters, dice and the 
cheapest line of pretty tally cards and prizes in the 
city. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 



JOHN H. WARE 



NOTARY PUBLIC 

AND COMMISSIONER OF DEEDS 

Room 303 JAMES FLOOD BLDG, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main 3:u;i 





HOLLIDAY REALTY 


CO. 




DEALERS IN 




CITY and COUNTRY REAL 


ESTATE 




M. HOU.IDAY. Manager 




Office 


322 JAMES FLOOD BUILDING. 970 MARKET STREET 




San Francisco. Cal. Tel. John 3t;6<; 



Formerly of 6 O'Farrell St. 



Telephone James 1231 



2>-R. J. XV. LEVy 

SURGEON CHIROPODIST 

Office Hours -vi a. in. to 6 p- m. Sundays: '.». a. m. to 12 m. 

ROOMS 605-7. NEW JAMES FLOOD BUILDING 

MARKET AND POWELL ST8.. S. F. 







w. 


F. 


Mclaughlin 

DENTIST 






Formerly 


in the 


Emma Spreckcls Building, 


now 


in the 






NEW JAMES FLOOD BUILDING 






Cor. 


Market C&, Powell 


Rooms 976-978 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Dr. O. A. Hasslinger, "Dentist 

lias removed from 933 MARKET STREET, to his rooms in the new 
JAMES FLOOD BUILDING, Rooms 980-982 

Porcelain Work a specialty. Hours '.1-12; 1:30-5. Tel. Main 333x 
Cor. MARKET »nd POWELL STS. 



Graduate of Ihe Philadelphia Dental W.eie IMi.uk: James 571 

Dr. Albert C. K.ellogg 

DENTIST 

HAS REMOVED FROM THE PHELAN BUILDING TO 
312-314 JAMES FLOOD BLDG.. 970 Market St. 

Opposite Emporium San Francisco 



TO THE DENTAL PROFESSION 

Julius P. Jaegeling has removed his dental laboratory to 
the James Flood Building, room 1288, 12th Floor, where I 
hav opened the largest, lightest and best equipped dental 
laboratory on the Pacific Coast, and will be prepared to 
handle any amount of work you might favor me with. 
Thanking you for all favors extended to me in the past. 
I am, Respectfully yours, 

J. P. Jaegeling. D. D. S. 
Phone John 3256. 



COMMANDER U. S. NAVT 

Mr. George Mayerle— Dear Sir: The eye-glassei 
you made for me are the most satisfactory pair I 
have had in the last thirty years. Check in pay- 
ment is inclosed herewith. Very respectfully, 

W. W. KIMBALL. Comm'der U. S. ijavy. 

$200.00 REWARD 

For (he arrest ard conviction of any party or parties oblalnlnr. 
none)' by falsely representing themselves as GEORGE MAYERLE, 
Uie German Expert Optician, or bis aeent, 




GEORGE MAYERLE'S RYE WATER 
Is a harmless and effective 
remedy ; it instantiy relieves all | 
eye troubles and makes weak, 
eyes strong, diseased eyes well, 
rests tired eyes. 

60c : by mail 62c. Caution : The genuine bears the 
trade mark, an eye in a crown. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

1071 MARKET ST. Near 7th Street 




February 4. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

THE LUXOR GRILL. 
Connected with the Luxor Apartment Hotel, :it 
■nc of the handsomest cafes and 
-co, which is conducted on a thor- 
oughly up-to-il urnished in wcatli- 

tak, and the commodious dining-room ai: 
excellent accommodations ptions and dinners. 

The Luxor grill has found great favor with San Fran- 
ihionable diners-out, and is frequently the 
scene of pleasant dinner and luncheon parties, at 
which are assembled many of the city's most promi- 
nent people. The management of the Luxor has 
made the grill a special feature of the hotel. Every 
apartment is connected with the grill by means of 
electric dumb waiters, and by 'phoning, an order can 
be transmitted in a short time to the desired apart- 
ment. 



NEWS LETTER. 



«7 



SUNSET MAGAZINE FOR FEBRUARY. 
Some authoritative articles on redeeming arid lands 
in the West are contributed to this month's Sunset 
by 1 Governor Pardee. Alexander McAdie of the 
Weather Bureau, E. A. Sterling of the Bureau of 
Forestry, and A. E. Chandler, State Engineer of Ne- 
vada. The articles are well illustrated, and give some 
important information. Several fine descriptive ar- 
ticles, beautifully illustrated with half-tones, two or 
three good short stories, and some clever verse help 
to make up a capital number, and a particularly in- 
teresting one for Eastern friends. For sale at all 
news-stands. 



Murine Eye Remedy. 



There i- to be a very important ai 
property of the United Railroads on the 9th of this 
month. The piece-, offered to the public are 

able in every sense of the word, and comprise | 

erty on nub, Valencia, Folsom, Tehama, Shipley, 
McAllister, Carl. Pacific Avenue, 30th street and Sun- 
nyside. There are twelve desirable loti 1 and 

Mann- streets, facing (.butch. These are choice resi- 
dence locations. There are business locations on 16th 
mar Valencia, and Valencia near r6th. Then' are 
splendid sites for manufacturing purposes on Shipley, 
Tehama and Clementina. The Devisadero, McAl- 
lister and Carl streets and the adjacent pieces are 
suitable for residence or business purposes. 

The executive committee of the May Festival held 
its regular monthly meeting in room 356, City Hall. 
Monday, the 23d lilt. Reports of the various com- 
mittees indicated that the work of preparation for 
the great festival is now beginning in earnest. The 
work of the chorus will be well and thoroughly 
done with H. J. Stewart, W. C. Stadtfeld and Fred 
Maurer at the helm. These rehearsals are being held 
in the auditorium of the Girls' High School. 

Techau Tavern is recognized as a refined and quiet 
place for refreshment after the theatre. The best of 
wines and table delicacies are served. A well-organ- 
izd orchestra is in attendance. 



Alien's Press Clipping Bureau, 30 California street, San 

Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper information, business, 
personal, political, from press of State, coast and country. Teh 
Main 1042. 



A home cure for Bye troubles, 
and adult. Doesn't smart. 



Never falls. Used for Infant 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" 

for your children while teething. 



MARKET STREET 

REFEREE 

AUCTION SALE 



BY ORDER OF HENRY P. UMBSEN, Sole Referee 



Tuesday, Feb. 28, 1905 

AT TWELVE O'CLOCK NOON 

Assessed Valuation, fiscal year 1904-1905 $307,356.00 
Gross rents monthly 864.00 

Insured for $25,000, average yearly premium 570.40 
Tenants pay water rate 

SOUTHWEST CORNER 

Market and Eleventh Streets 

San Francisco 

Fronting 275 Feet on Market Street and 275 Feet on 
Eleventh Street 

At our Salesrooms 20 MONTGOMERY STREET 

G. H. UMBSEN $ CO. Real Estate Auctioneers 





MARKET STREET 






2 7 5 






1- 




\\- 


Ul 




Muj 


Hi 




BS u- 1 


a 

r- 

z 






s 


-V 


r 


1- 




r- 


u. 


7 


z 


_i 


/ « 


tu 


Ul 


n/ n 


> 


£ 


/>> CM 


j 


h 


5tSO 


UJ 




MISSION STREET 





i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 4, 1905. 



PURE 


AROMATIC 




THE BEST IN THE WORLD 




PONCE DE LEON 




GENUINE PORTO RICO COFFEE 


Depot: 587-589 Howard St., S. F. 


SMOOTH 


WHOLESOME 




DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Phoenix Savings, B. & L. Association. 

For the six months ending December so, 1904. dividends have been 
declared as follows: On Participating Stock at the rate of 8 per cent 
per annum ; on Term Certificates at the rate of 5 per cent per annum; 
on Ordinary Savings Accounts at the rate 4% per cent per annum, free 
of taxes and payable on and after January 20. 1906. The Phoenix has a 
guarantee capital of $300,oou and a total paid-in capital of tl.floo.ooo. Its 
board of directors are: A- A. Watkins. president: Charles R. Bishop 
vice-present ; S- Prentiss Smith, treasurer ; George 0. Boardman, 
director; Gavin Me Nab, director; Charles E. Ladd, director. 

CLARENCE GRANGE, Secretary and Managing Director. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Seg. Belcher & Mides Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 36 

Amount per share 5 cents 

Levied Jan. 4, 1905 

Delinquent in office Feb. 7, 1905 

Day of sale of delinquent stock Feb. 27, 1905 

E. B. HOLMES. Secretary. 
Office— Room 60. No- 309 Montgomery <j> treet. Pan Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Potosi Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco, California 
Location of works. Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held on the 18th day of Jan. 1905. an assessment (No. 1) of 10 cents, 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the secretary, at the office 
of the Company. Room 79. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. 
San Francisco. Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 21st DAY OF FEB. 1905. 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on Wed., the 15th day of March 
1905. to pay the delinquent assessment together with costs of adver- 
tising, and expenses of sale. 

By Order of the Board of Directors. 

CHA8. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco. California. 

^ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco. California. 
Location of works, Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held on the 17th day of Jan.. 1905, an assessment (No. l) of 16 cents 

Ker share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation. paya- 
le immediately in United States gold coin. to the Secretary at the office 
of the Company. Room u, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco. California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
20th DAY OF FEBRUARY. 1905 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction; and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on Monday, the 13th 
day of March. 1905. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 
By order of the Board of Directors. 

E. L. PARKER. Secretary. 
Office— Room 14, Ne ada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street. San 
Francisco. California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco. Cal. Location 
of works. Virginia City. Htorey County. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held on the 21st day of January. 1905. an assessment (No. 1) of ten 
liol cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the secretary at the 
office of the company, room 69, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 24th DAY OF FEBRUARY. 1906 
will be delinquent and advertised for saleatpubllo auction ;and unlesB 
payment is made before will be sold on Wednesday, the 15th day of 
March, 1905. to pay the delinquent assessment together with the oost 
of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. B. SHAW. Secretary. 

Office— Room fi9 Nevada blook, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. 



The Comstock Market, while it 
Pine-St. Market, is not making much of a pyro- 

technical display just now, ex- 
hibits a strong and healthy undertone, which must 
be accepted as significant, in view of the manner in 
which the late ore development in Ophir has opened 
up. Upon that development, in a large measure, 
hangs the fate of the market for the time being. The 
winze now down 105 feet in ore of a high grade, in 
a new ledge and in a new county, has been stayed 
temporarily in the matter of its downward extension 
for reasons which people acquainted with mining 
will doubtless appreciate. Prudence and the necessi- 
ties involved in mining at this depth and in an out- 
of-the-way portion of the mine, suggested the neces- 
sity for an upraise from the low point of the winze, 
to provide for a ladder-way and the installation of 
an air pipe. This is the work now being carried 
on in this interesting section of the lode. With this 
preparatory work completed, everything will be in 
readiness to begin the exploration of the new find of 
ore. Should the vein open out north and south, as 
well as it has done in depth, there will be music in 
the air, for it will mean the street will once more 
be face to face with a new bonanza discoveries, with 
all the possibilities which that will offer for clearing 
up fortunes on a large scale. At the Ward shaft, and 
on the Hale & Norcross mine, some very interesting 
work is going on which will shortly be heard from in 
the way of results. The Justice shares have been 
strong and active recently on the renewal of bullion 
shipments. It is hoped the mine wil soon be on a 
self-sustaining basis. 



Considerable activity and higher prices marked 
the course of the market for Tonopah-Goldfield 
stocks during the past week. The list of shares has 
swollen materially, the transfers in the big board ag- 
gregating 491,858 shares for the week, with a record 
of transfers amounting to 293,730 shares in the S. F. 
& Tonopah Exchange. North Star and Midway were 
the features of trading in the big Board, the former 
with a record of 91,800 shares sold, and the latter with 
sales of 76,600 shares. On the other exchange, 103,- 
200 shares of MacNamara changed hands, quite a fea- 
ture in itself. Nearly all of the leading stocks show 
substantial gains for the week, and are in firm de- 
mand at the close. 



The way things are working 

Where a Report just now in local financial 

Would be Timely, circles does not tend to 

strengthen the confidence of 
investors in that branch of finance which comes under 
the head of building and loan societies. The fact that 
proceedings have been begun by the Attorney-Gen- 
eral of the State to enjoin the Pacific Coast Savings 
Society and its directors from doing business, came 
in the form of a surprise, and the fact that this step 
has been taken by the State Building and Loan Com- 
missioners, shows that for once officials at the head 
of public bureaus of the kind have done their duty. 
A report from those officials on the status of all the 
building and loan associations doing business here, 
which are under their jurisdiction, would be timely 
just now, and serve to satisfy the public demand 



February 4, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



reliable information on a Mil>joct of vital 
Is nf in\i stoi - ["hat other 

•f tlic kinil now in operation arc lioth well 

nt. will naturally be inferred from 

that tlio I - arc silent on the 

n, the desirability of official 

uld recommend itself t'> 

the several managements whose business interests 

arc more or less at stake. 

A despatch from London gravely 
Cold from the announces the discovery by an in- 
Briny Deep. ventor of a new process for the 
extraction of p>ld from sea water. 
The inventor's name is Snell, and he is an English- 
man. The last time the world experimented with a 

ventor of the kind, investors were up against 
an American genius. The contact did not last long, 
and when he dusted across the Atlantic, he carried a 
sack with his winning. It would be a dangerous 
game to try a second time in this country, which 
probably accounts for the latest appearance of the 
bunko man in London. The name of Sir William 
Rainscy, the world-renowned scientist, is linked with 
the process upon this occasion. The use of a good 
name or two on the prospectus is customary in con- 
nection with the cultivation of the particular breed 
of gudgeons which usually jump at this bait. Asso- 
ciated with Sir William, are such men as Lords 
Brassey and Tweedale, and a former Governor of the 
Bank of England. Sir William Ramsey, who has, it is 
said, made experiments, is quoted to the following 
effect: "There is no dotiDt Snell has proved that gold 
can profitably be obtained from sea water on a large 
scale, and the amount of gold obtained is so large 
that whether the cost of treatment is four pounds a 
ton or the outside figure of eight pounds, which it 
could not exceed, it would not make very much dif- 
ference." While no one, under ordinary circum- 
stances, would doubt a statement made by Sir Wil- 
liam Ramsey, in this instance there is wide room for 
disbelief in the reliability of the despatch, which 
places him in such a light before the public. It will 
be time enough- to believe in what, up to the present, 
is generally recognized as a glittering absurdity, 
when the genuine returns materialize, vouched for 
by financiers of national repute. 



The San Francisco Gas and Electric Company- 
filed a financial statement with the Board of Super- 
visors this week, showing that the revenue of the 
corporation during 1904 was $4,396,859.08 from sales 
of gas, electric current and other sources. The cost 
to the company was $3,331,425.33, leaving a net profit 
of $1,065,433.75. Dividends amounting to $792,421.68 
were paid, leaving a surplus amounting to $273,- 
012.07, The original cost of the plant is stated to be 
$13,042,578.55, and its present cost and value is fixed 
at $26,053,756.62. The capital stock outstanding 
amounts to $15,794,284.36, bonds outstanding $9,813,- 
000, and net amount of floating debt $816,934.19. 



The directors of the California Gas and Electric 
Corporation have declared a dividend of 25 cents 
a share, payable February 15th. The comparative 
statement of the operations of this company for the 
month of December show the following increases : 
Gross earnings, $158,069.84; expenses, $117,471.41; 
profit, $40,598.43 ; corporation bond interest, $3,125, 
and net surplus, $37,473.43. 

The gross earnings of the California Northwestern 
Railway Company in December, 1904, were $106,- 
861, an increase of $6,304 as compared with Decem- 
ber, 1903. The net earnings decreased $3,146, For 



the six months ending December 31, 1904, the . 
earnings were $877,355, ■"' : 
December, tgoj, The net earnings in< 
and the surplus, after charges, amounted to 
on December 31, 1904, an increase of $36, r 



L E PAGE'S MUCILAGE 

tntog to elojt no*"k of ttottU* — No 

nl mil not »ih Minor <1 "rotor the 
fines! paper*. Full 3 01. tKHUcrriaiU at 
. it •-■m i>f mail for lO*-.; also lialf- 
piiiis, pints Ami quart*. 

If Page's Photo Paste, 

retaliate, ; r>* malt. 10c 

L E PAGES GLUFH?" 

lojt.tn'Ulcorttibe. loc ; by inrtil.Kc 
RL'SSU CftlRn C0« 112 Baits At*., BtueMtr, »»»«. 





Important 

Auction 

Sale 

Thursday, 

Feb. 9, 

1905 

At 12 O'clock Noon at our 
Office and Salesroom, 25 
Post Street, by order of the 

UNITED RAILROADS of San Francisco 

HOME BUILDING LOTS, FACTORY SITES 
WAREHOUSES, STABLES 

THE CHANCE FOR THE HOMESEEKER, THE SPECULATOR 
AND THE INVESTOR 

Properties on 16th, Valencia, Folsom, 
Tehama, Shipley, McAllister, Carl, Paci- 
fic Avenue, 30th Street and Sunnyside. 

12 lots, corner 30th and Dame, opposite Church Street. Take 
Mission or Guerrero Street Cars. 

Business properties Valencia near 16th and ltith near Valencia 

Manufacturing or Stable Sites, Folsom, Shipley and Clara 
Streets, between 4th and 6th, also Tehama and Clementina be- 
tween 3d and 4th. 

Pacific Avenue and Devisadero. McAllister near Devisadero, 
Carl Street near Willard, all fine building lots ; also several other 
holdings. Call at offiae for catalogue. 

For Particulars and Diagrams at our Office 

BALDWIN $ HOWELL 

AUCTIONEERS 

25 POST STREET. SAN iFRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 4, 1905. 




Of course, the choicest tid-bit of gossip is the post- 
ponement of Eugenie Hawes' luncheon, on account 
of her romance with the Reverend David Crabtree, 
running amuck in the parlors of the Hotel Pleasanton. 
I hear that Mrs. Schroeder has somewhat relented in 
her determination to chill the rector's suit, and it 
looks now as if parental objections were getting ready 
to go way back and disappear. However, Miss 
Hawes still insists that she is not engaged to the 
Redwood curate, but no one takes that as a " 'pon 
honor" denial. 

Mrs. Schroeder is very fond of society, and is one 
of the most indefatigable hostesses in town. She has 
given any number of delightful affairs for her debu- 
tante daughter, and it is only on account of her so- 
cial ambitions that she objects to her daughter mar- 
rying into the quiet life of the church. Society is 
standing on the tiptoe of expectation for the de- 
nouement in this little romantic drama. 

t it i 

It is not expected that the Francis Burton Har- 
risons will arrive here much before Lent, so there 
will not be any very elaborate affairs given in their 
honor, but Mary Harrison undoubtedly will be the 
motif of many informal gatherings. Mrs. Harrison 
is very popular with her friends, and she never misses 
an opportunity to offer hospitality to Californians 
adrift in New York, so it is no wonder that she is 
payed back in the same good coin on her visits out 
here. I hear that Mary took her husband's political 
defeat very much to heart, so that is a taboo subject 
with her now. 

* * * 

That itinerant house, the old Newhall home has 
at last anchored securely on the Pacific avenue lot 
selected for it, and in its transformed state is scarce- 
ly recognizable. Mrs. George Newhall has not taken 
a very keen interest in society this season, but now 
that she is settled in her new home, she is contem- 
plating entertaining on a scale befitting the commo- 
dious house. I hear that the George Newhalls have 
so many priceless objets d'art around that it was 
hard to find maids who were willing to take the re- 
sponsibility of dusting them. 

* * » 

The Friday Night Cotillion, inaugurated by Mrs. 
Inez Shorb White, went off merrily, but it cannot, in 
all fairness, be classed as a rival of Mr. Greenway's 
cotillions. At the Greenway's, the married set are as 
much in evidence as the younger clique, and the 
smartest of the smart set invariably accept bids to 
the Friday Night Club. Mrs. White is said to have 
drawn the lines for quality, not financial quality, but 
it is money that makes other things besides the world 
go round, and in the plethora of ducats represented 
at the Greenway's, one finds the wherewithal of the 
sumptuousness that obtains at the Greenway affairs. 
The genial Ned belongs to blue-blooded stock him- 
self, but he knows the value, for all that, of the yellow 
gleam of gilded folk, and so he does not arbitrate too 
severely against the newly-moneyed. He knows how 
to mix the ingredients of a cotillion or a cocktail to 
a nicety, and it's too bad he doesn't pass his recipe 
around. 

* * * 

A large but informal dinner was given by the De 
Youngs on Sunday, and Mrs. Louis Monteagle and 



several other tea hostesses took the edge off the day 
of rest. But Monday was the most strenuous day 
of the week, particularly for the Eastern visitors 
who are being lionized by the smart set. Florence 
Bailey started the ball a-rolling by a luncheon in 
honor of Lurline Spreckels, which was a very dainty 
affair, and charmingly presided over by that ani- 
mated little hostess. Later in the afternoon, the tea 
given by Elizabeth and Florence Cole, in honor of 
Miss Constance Crimmins and Miss Katherine Mc- 
Cann, brought out all the younger set, and there 
was a merry scuffle for home, just in time to dress 
for dinner, by those fortunate enough to be invited to 
the elaborate affair Mr. Phelan gave in honor of Mrs. 
Augustus Spreckels and the much-feted Lurline. As 
usual, Mr. Phelan provided a vaudeville entertain- 
ment as an after-dinner amusement for his guests. At 
the dinner, by the way, Mr. Phelan used, instead of 
the club's service, his own crystal, which he brought 
back from Europe. 

A stag luncheon given by John Zeile in the Palm 
Garden gave the men an inning, and Mrs. H. M. A. 
Miller gave a few of her itimate friends a chance to 
show their prowess at seductive bridge, so you see 
Monday was crammed just as full as it could be. 

Tuesday was another busy day, inaugurated by 
a luncheon given by Mrs. Lowenberg in the Palace 
Palm Garden. Mrs. Lowenberg is best beloved of 
all club-women, and her guests always catch the 
sweet spirit of the hostess, so her affairs are always 
foregone successes. The decorations at this last 
luncheon were quite the prettiest so far of the series 
Mrs. Lowenberg is giving-, and excited much admiring 
comment from her guests. The Mayo Newhalls 
and the Thomas Magees were among the dinner 
hosts in the evening, the debutante set gathering at 
the Newhall festive board, where a special honor was 
paid to Miss Charlotte Wilson, and the young mar- 
ried set enjoving the Magee hospitality. 
* * * 

Wednesday, in an inclement mood, tried to throw 
a wet blanket over things social. The rain was par- 
ticularly regretted by Miss Hilda Van Sicklen, who 
had planned to give a luncheon at the new Claremont 
Country Club to a number of friends from this side 
of the bay. Mrs. Pelham Ames was a bridge hostess 
and Mrs. George Mendell acted in like capacity. 



R. B. HAYDEN" 

HAND MADE SOUR MASH 

WHISKEY 



THE FINEST WHISKr MAIS 

IN KFNTUCKY 
THE HOME OF BCURBi NS 

DISTILLED BT 

GREENBRIER DISTILLERY CO. 

Nelson, Co., Ky. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
Agents Pacific Coast San Francisco, CaL 




February 4. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



made the motif 
chart sj Helen ing ;i 

* • • 

A I luncheon and a dinner part] 

ccntnat.il Thursday, and tin- chief event on Fridav 
the Kohl dance, t" which Mrs. Fred Kohl's 

- have been looking eagerly forward. 

« « • 

This afternoon, Miss Beatrice Fife i> giving a tea 

and the Auxiliary of Pioneer Women hold their an- 
nual reception. The ubiquitous bridge party at Mrs. 
Breedon's, and in the evening the Downey Harveys 
.art dinner narty. Next week's calendar 
is already pre-empted by hostesses, as the records 
show. 

* * » 

Miss I.ita Gallatin was married on Wednesday af- 
ternoon to Doctor William I'. Harvey, at her mother's 
residence, 2173 Pacific street. It was a beautiful, 
though a quiet affair, the relatives of groom and bride 
being the only ones present. The bride was attired 
in a beautiful white lace gown, and presented a 
striking picture against the tasty pink decorations 
of the reception room . It was a pink wedding, and 
a delightful collation was served to the assembled 
guests, while delightful music filled the air. 

* * * 

Heir Schoeniger is to be the leader of the new or- 
chestra which is to play hereafter at the Palace. In 
addition to the orchestra, a very fine pipe organ has 
been installed, and the guests will have the benefit of 
Mr. Schoeniger's ability at this instrument as well. 
The Aeolian is on the third floor, and faces the court. 

* * * 

The Woman's Auxiliary, B. A. U., gave a Five 
Hundred party Monday- evening at Elks' Hall. 

Miss Rosenblatt and Mr. Alfred S. Gump will be 
at home, 2901 California street, Sunday, February 
I2th. 

Arrivals at Hotel Rafael during week ending Jan. 
31, 190s: Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Nourse, Miss M. Pease, 
Mr. A. B. Watson, Mr. and Mrs. A. Ullmann, Mr. T. 
McMullin, Mr. H. H. Taylor, Mrs. J. C. Baird, Mr. 
F. G. Lemmon, Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Anderson, Mr. 
H. R. Baker, Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Neustadter, Mr. A. 
I. Rosseter, Mrs. W. E. Rosseter, Miss Rosseter, 
Mrs. L. A. Divoll, Mrs. S. Ehrman, Mr. F. R. Milneri 

The Hotel Pleasanton always seems to be trying 
to do something for the entertainment of its guests. 
To-morrow night, Mr. de Wolf, the proprietor, has 
engaged the Hawaiian Quintette to render their 
native songs and music. Sunday evening is usually 
a quiet one at home or abroad, but Mr. de Wolfe, 
in introducing this novelty, will certainly dispose of 
the after-dinner hour very pleasantly. 



ENTERTAINMENTS. 

January 28th (Saturday) — First Assembly of the 
Friday Cotillion Club. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Knight gave a dinner party. 

January 29th (Sunday) — Mrs. M. H. de Young gave 
a dinner party. Mrs. Louis Monteagle gave an 
informal tea. Captain and Mrs. McAndrew gave 
a dinner party. 

January 30th (Monday) — Mr. James D. Phelan gave 
a dinner in honor of Mrs. Augustus Spreckels 
and Miss Lurline Spreckels. The Misses Cole 
gave a tea in honor of Miss Constance Crimmins 
and Miss Katherine McCann. Miss Alice May 
gave a tea. Miss Florence Bailey gave a lunch- 
eon in honor of Miss Lurline Spreckels. Mrs. 
H. M. A. Miller gave a bridge party. 



■1 

January 31 il wna || 

.1 dinner in honor of Mi 
Mrs. Thomas Magi dinner in the Palm 

Garden, flu- Axmj 1 

Young's. Mrs. Isidore Lowi lunch- 

eon. 

February 1 (Wednesda; Hilda Van Sicklen 

a luncheon at the new Claremonl ( ountry 
Club. Mrs. George II. Mendell gave a 
part>. Miss Helen Bailej gave a tea in honor 
of Mi~s Louise Whitney. Mrs. Pelham Ames 
gave a bridge parly. Mr. and Mrs. Mountford 
Wilson gave a dinner. 

February 4 < Saturday)— Miss Beatrice Fife is giv- 
ing a tea to-day. Mr. and Mrs. J. Downey Har- 
vey will give a dinner party. Auxiliary of Pio- 
neer Women will hold annual reception. Mrs. 
Bernard Breedon entertains at cards. 

February 6 (Monday) — Mrs. Emory Winship will 

give a luncheon in honor of Lily Spreckels. 

February 7 (Tuesday) — Mr. anil Mrs. J. Downey 
Harvey will give a dinner in honor of Miss Crim- 
mins anil Miss McCann. Mrs. Latham McMullin 
will give a bridge party. Mrs. Alexander Gar- 
ccau will entertain at bridge. 

February (Thursday) — Charles N. Felton will give 
a dance in honor of Miss Lily Spreckels and 
Harry Holbrook. Miss Margaret Newhall will 
give a tea. 

February 10 (Friday) — Mr. and Mrs. Albert N. 
Drown will give a dance in Century Hall in honor 
of Miss Newell Drown. 

February 14 (Friday) — Mr. and Mrs. Willis E. Davis 
will give a dance in honor of Miss Edna Davis. 
ENGAliEMENTS. 

Miss Edith Muir, niece of Mrs. Alexander Boyd, to 
Thornhill Carmany. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

February 21 (Tuesday) — Miss Alice Bacon to Thos. 
Driscoll. 

February 22 (Wednesday) — Miss Ethel Wallace to 
Charles Fickert. 

March 8 (Wednesday) — Miss Grace Hecht to John 
Rothschild. 



The Star Hair Remedv— best of all tonics and restoratives. 

Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not a dye. 
At druggists and hair dressers. Accept no substitute. Star 
Remedy Co., 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 

tf you want your old suit to look like new, send it to 

Spauldin'g's Cleaning and Dyeing Works, 127 Stockton street. 
Careful dressers always do this. Spaulding's also clean gloves, 
cravats, curtains, laces and all such goods. 



Decorations for weddings, Charlotte F. Williams, 281 Post St. 



A SKin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 

kR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL CREAM 
OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freok- 
les, Moth Patches, Rash ana 
Skin Diseases, and every blem- 
ish on beauty, and defies detec- 
tion. It has stood the test of 
50 years and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly 
made. Accept no counterfeit of 
similar name. Dr. L. A. Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut ton 
(a patient): "As you ladies will 
use them, I recommend 'Gour- 
aud's Cream' as the least harm- 
ful of all the skin preparations. 
For sale by all druggists ana 
fancy-goods dealers in the 
United States, Canadas and Eu- 
rope. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop. 
S7 Great Jones St., New York. 




NEWTON J. THARP 

ARCHITECT 

131 Post Street. San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 4, 1905. 



The 1905 




Side Entrance 16 Horse Power Double Cylinder Touring Car 

Has Arrived 

Call and see it. ^________ 

Rambler Automobile Agency, '"'market st. 



Cor. 10th. 



Phone South 1007 



BEFORE PURCHASING 1905 MODEL AUTOMOBILE SEE THE 

FUNGS- 
FINCH 

4 Cylinder $1,800 
Touring Car 

B. B. STANLEY. Aet. 

Sales Rooms— 596 GOLDEN 
QATE AVE.. S. P. 





Type VIII, 30-38 h. p. 1905 Pope Toledo. Demonstrating car has 
arrived. Car guaranteed to carry 5 people on road, a mile a minuet 

POPE TOLEDO TOURING CAR CO. 

G. A. BOYER, Manager 

134-148 GOLDEN GATE AVE., S. F. PHONE SOUTH 1142 




CADILLAC 
RUNABOUT 



Cadillac four cylinder 30 H. P. - - $2,950 

Cadillac touring car - $1,100 

CUTLER LEE, Agent. 201-203 LARKIN ST. 

Telephone South 908 




J& 


AUTOMOBILE 


SPECIALTIES 


j& 


Geo. P. Moore £8, Co. 
325 VAN NESS AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



There are few persons who will not admit by this 
time that the automobile is a practical vehicle. Its 
thousands of users are the best judges of this, and 
they will cheerfully bear testimony to the truth of 
the contention. Whether they tour extensively or 
for short distances, or simply use their automobiles 
as a method of transportation, much as they would 
use a horse and buggy, they have found that it not 
only surpasses other transportation vehicles in speed 
and radius, but it has at last come to be as reliable as 
the steam locomotive, and as worthy of trust, even 
though it seldom receives the attention that the lat- 
ter does. The business vehicle is the logical suc- 
cessor of the one now so largely used for pleasure, 
and this fact is daily becoming more evident. 

In all branches of business is the automobile invad- 
ing and showing its superiority over the horse. It 
is only a few days ago that Chief Sullivan of the San 
Francisco Fire Department decided to give up his 
sturdy steed for the more useful and reliable self- 
propelled car to convey him to the scene of fires. 
What better argument is needed to show the automo- 
bile is rapidly becoming the successor of the horse- 
drawn vehicle. Mankind is surely losing an invalu- 
able friend when it neglects the modern creation. 

* * * 

It was at the meeting of the Fire Commissioners 
last Monday that the Middleton Motor Car Co. was 
advised that Chief Engineer Kinnie, after much care- 
ful study in the different makes of cars, recommende 1 
the purchase of the Autocar runabout as the most 
satisfactory car for the use of the Fire Chief, and was 
ordered to deliver three of these cars to the depart- 
ment that afternoon. Chief Sullivan is to use one, 
Chief Wills the second, and at the time of this writ- 
ing, it had not yet been decided who would be lucky 
enough to secure the third. Chief Wills had his car 
out the same afternoon they were delivered, but Chief 
Sullivan had his initial ride Tuesday morning. They 
intended to use their autos immediately, and no doubt 
before this is to press, they will have answered 

numerous alarms in their swift horseless carriages. 

* * * 

Last Monday, Chief Wills' runabout was delivered 
to him, and the incident of his initial run will be 
well worth repeating, showing, as it did, the sim- 
plicity of the cars which were selected, and also 
proving that all automobiles are not complicated in 
their mechanism, so that no one can understand them. 

The demonstrator brought the car up to the engine- 
house on Bush street, and Chief Wills, one of the 
best-liked men in the department, was already anx- 
iously awaiting the arrival of the car. As it was 
stopped, he said, somewhat to himself: "Put back 
the spark, put in the plug( fix batteries and then pull 
over the crank." "You're right." said the demon- 
strator, and immediately the Chief cranked her up, 
and without hesitation the engine started. The 
demonstrator sat at the steering gear, when, to his 
surprise, his scholar said : "Get out of there ; I am 
going to run that car. I read the pamphlet — what 
do you think I am — a dunce?" Although never hav- 
ing been in an automobile, but no doubt having care- 
fully studied the operation of the car. he seated 
himself at the steering lever, and to the amazement 
of his would-be tutor and the several firemen looking 



February 4, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



■mi Kcamv lie wont lickcty- 
split, and before lie was through his initial ride, lie 
bad been up anil down Market street several times — 
a la Barney < 'Idlicld — onec nearly running over a 
(which he now has 110 use for), hut neverthc- 
lic proved himself quite an expert driver of a 
chug-wagon. 

» • » 

Andrew Carnegie and Ins wife were among the 
prominent it the recent automobile show in 

New York. Both like automobiling, and prefer the 
American car to that of foreign make. He placed his 
order for a Winton limousine. 

* * • 

The automobile Club of France has stirred up a 
hornet's nest in the international automobile field. 
by their desire to have the Grand Prix run on the 
same day and over the same course as the Gordon 
Bennett race. The readers of this department will 
recall, as mentioned last week, that the Grand Prix 
is a new international race proposed by the Automo- 
bile Club of France. The event is open to every 
country, and each individual maker has the privilege 
of competing. France's action has been considered 
anything but sportsmanlike, and autoists in general 
remark that she will do well by arranging the Grand 
Prix so that it does not conflict with the Gordon 

Bennett. 

* * * 

Among the local motorists to return last week 
from the scene of the annual exhibition of motor cars 
in Xew York was George E. Middleton. He was de- 
lighted with the show, which he says was the greatest 
of all the shows ever held in this country. He took 
several rides in the new four-cylinder Autocar, and is 
well satisfied with both the appearance and riding 
qualities of this machine. 



»3 




The Best 
Transmission 



Most automobile 
troubles arise in 
the tmnsnmsioii 

case. The transmission of the Cadillac has solved 

one ot' the most difficult problems of the automobile. 

It insures perfect rani) ftig, reduces cost of 

maintenance and repairs and gives 

greater power. It is simple, 

strong and noiseless. 

Every part 

of the 




is built 
with care, thor- 
oughness, and precision. 
The result is extreme durability 
and absence of annoyance to the operator. 
The speed range of the Cadillac is from four to 
thirty miles an hour, the maximum speed being 
easily maintained with four passengers. Let us send 
you booklet A E and give you the name of the near- 
est Cadillac agency where you can satisfy yourself 
that nothing at double the money equals the Cadillac. 
Prices, $750 to $900. 



CADILLAC 

AUTOMOBILE 

COMPANY, 

Detroit, Mich. 

Member Association 
Licensed Automobile 
Manufacturers. 



Model B 
*900 




Perfected Dunlop Detachable Tire 



Solves the problem of 
proper cost for tire 
maintenance. Made of 
the best rubber by the 
most expert workmen. 
No rim cutting. No 
creeping. No pinching 
of tubes. Punctures 
easily and quickly re- 
paired. 





It can be detached by 
a novice in less time 
than any other tire. Ex- 
pand the ring by means 
of the turnbuckle, re- 
move ring and slip 
outer cover from rim. 

SIMPLE. 
EASY. 

QUICK. 



ffiBADE MABM . 

The Hartford Rubber Works Company, Hartford, conn. 



Boston 



New YorK 



Detroit 



Philadelphia 
Minneapolis 



Buffalo 
San Francisco 



Cleveland 

St. Louis 



Chicago 

Los Angeles 



Denver 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 4, 1905. 




A few of the numerous Packard enthusiasts. Mr. 
car. 

Colonel John Jacob Astor was among the promi- 
nent New Yorkers who recently purchased four-cylin- 
der Cadillacs. This machine of thirty horse-power, 
attracted a great deal of attention at the New York 
show, on account of its luxurious appearance. The 
transmission used in this car is one that is a decided 
innovation in cars of this type. The changing of 
the gears cannot be noticed by one riding in the car, 

and it is impossible to strip the gears. 

* * * 

Among the new automobiles that are to be pushed ~- 
in this territory this season will be the twenty-two 
horse-power side entrance car of the Buick Motor 
Car Company, which will sell for $1,350. This car is 
finished in a beautiful royal blue, with brass trim- 
mings and light yellow running gear. Cuyler Lee 
has been appointed California agent for this ma- 
chine. 

* * * 

Mr. Courtney Ford has just purchased a four-cylin- 
der side entrance Packard car from the Pacific Motor 
Car Co., 49 City Hall avenue, with which he expects 
to do a great deal of touring this winter in the south- 
ern part of the State. He also intends taking his car 

abroad next summer. 

* * * 

Among some of the owners of Autocars seen in the 
Park and Presidio last Sunday were Harrv Stets in, 
Thomas Brown and Frank Fries, who came up from 
Stanford to enjoy a ride in his runabout. 

* * * 

Another visitor at the show who is at present in the 
city, is Mr. Oilier, of the Olds Motor Works, who 
is on the coast in the interests of the Oldsmdbile, 
and will probably remain several months here, being 
well pleased with the automobile situation on the 
Pacific Coast. Mr. Oilier states that the two-cylinder 
Oldsmobile attracted considerable attention at the 
show. 



E. W. Hopkins' two cars and Mr. Geo. H. Lent's 

The "White Bulletin," a little pamphlet issued from 
time to time by the White Sewing Machine Com- 
pany, of Cleveland, Ohio, contains some interesting 
motoring news in its last number, which, on its unique 
cover, says: "White Predominates." .Most of the 
pages are given to the accounts of the most im- 
portant events in motoring during the seasons of 
1901, 1902, 1903 and 1904, in which it is shown the 

White predominated. 

* * * 

. The forty horse-power Columbia automobile, 
which, from the general opinion of the majority of 
visitors at the New York show, was one of the pret- 
tiest, if not the handsomest, at that recent exhibition, 
is among the 1905 models on the way to this city. 



Strong Sunlight, Wind and Dust 

Cause Eye Strain, Granulation and Redness. Murine Eye Remedy 
restores, cures Eye diseases, soothes Eye pain, aids those wear- 
ing glasses; doesn't smart. A favorite toilet requisite. 



PIERCE ARROW 




MOBILE C A'R'RI AGE CO. 

GOLDEN GATE AVE. and GOVGH ST. S. F. 



February 4. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'5 



Pleasure's Wand 

(Continued from Page 13.) 

si ami tnosl brilliant of 
all the Drury I r presented in Ibis 

trj by Kliw & Erlanger, will l>c seen at the 
i Opera House Monday night, Februarj 
with elaborate staging, all the original cast and the 
grcai ensemble of ,\?<< performers, which character 
the original American presentation at the New 
Amsterdam Theatre, New York. 
» » • 

Tin- ( Irpheum promises an excellent entertainment 

for tlu- week to come, and one of the features is 
Bob Cole and Rosamond Johnson. Mr. Johnson is a 
gc graduate, with honors from the New England 
Conservatory of Music, and it will he high-class 
music these colored gentlemen are to give us. 
» * * 

The grand opera season at the Tivoli will he ex- 
tended for two weeks. As big as the new opera house 
is. it has several times proven inadequate to accom- 
modate the throngs who have clamored for admis- 
sion. 

* * * 

Next Sunday afternoon, the Alameda Lustopiel 
Ensemble will give a testimonial benefit at the Co- 
lumbia in aid of the old-time actress and prompter, 

Mrs. Josephine La Fontaine. 

* * * 

At the Central Theatre, on Monday night next, "A 
Fight for Millions," one of the newest and most 
startling melodramas of modern times, will be pro- 
duced with the full strength of the Central Theatre 
Stock Company, with Juliet Crosby and Herschel 
Mayall in the leading roles. 

Next Tuesday night at the Alhambra Theatre, 
Mine. Melba and her company will give the first of 
two concerts to be offered in San Francisco, and it 
will also be the first of the entire group of three 
allotted to California. This is giving notice that 
those who live outside of San Francisco and Los An- 
geles will find it necessary to make a trip to town, 
if they desire to hear the Queen of Song. Paul Stein- 
dorff has been specially engaged to direct Melba's 
big orchestra when she appears here. Seats for the 

concerts are $4, $3, $2 and $1. 

* * * 

A pleasing announcement for this season to local 
music lovers is the engagement of Henry W..Savage's 
famous grand English Opera Company, that is to 
give San Francisco an opera festival at the Columbia 

Theatre, beginning Monday, February 27th. 

* * * 

A grand concert for the benefit of the Verdi monu- 
ment fund will be given at the Alhambra Theatre 
Friday evening, February 24th, under the auspices 
of the Verdi Monument Committee. 



The women of San Francisco are happy over the 
fact that the annual sale of Armand Cailleau is on 
in full blast. It is historical in San Francisco that 
Cailleau never sells old goods at these sales, and that 
the prices are the greatest bargains of the year. The 
result is the vast crowds at 112 to 116 Kearny street 
having the appearance of the population, under the at- 
traction of some great civic event. 



Borden's Eagle Brand 



Condensed Milk affords the maximum amount of food energy, in 
the minimum bulk, conferring the greatest good to the infant, 
with the least tax on the digestive organs. It surpasses all other 
foods for artificial infant feeding. Try it. 



ARRIVED 




&/>e BABY WINTON 

THE CAR ALL AMERICA IS TALKING ABOUT 

WE INVITE YOU TO CALL 
AND SEE IT. 

Watch the Arrival of the Olds 2 Cylinder 20 H. P. 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 



901-925 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Agents: WINTON. OLDSMOBILE and STEVENS-DUOTEA 
Oakland Agency— 355 loth Street. 



Autocar 

Four-Cylinder 



Double Side Entrance 
Vertical Motor— 10-20 H. P. 
Speed 40 to 46 Miles Per 
Hour- Superior Climber 
on any Hill : : : 

$2,150 




The reputation of the Autocar Company for clever designs and 
sound and ingenious construction is such that an exceptionally 
fine creation was confidently expected in the new four-cylinder 
car and the accompanying illustration makes it clear that so far 
as appearance goes this expedation has been fulfilled- The me- 
chanical excellence of the car becomes apparent as it is examined 
in detail and we are assured that Iheir eight years' experience 
enabled the Autocar Company to produce a four-cylinder car that 
cannot be surpassed by any automobile at any price. 

MIDDLETON MOTOR-CAR CO. 

606 Vin Ness Ave., S. F. 1 16-1 18 E. Third St.. Los Angeles 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of Alexander McLellan also called Alex McLellan. deceased, 
Dept. 10. No. 31718. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned. M. J. Hynes, Public Ad- 
ministrator of the City and County of San Fiancisco. and Administra- 
tor of the estate of Alexander McLellan also called A.'ex McLellan. 
■ieceased. to r he creditors of. and all persons having claims against 
the said deceased, to exhibit them with the necessary vouchers, within 
four months after the first publication <.f this not ice. to the said Admin- 
trator, at room 567. Parrott building. Nos. 825 to 855 Market street, the 
same being his place for the transaction of the business of the said 
estate in the City and County of San Francisco. State of California. 

M. J. HYNES, 

Administrator of the estate of Alexander McLellan also called Alex 
McLellan. Deceased. 

Dated at San Francisco, February 4, 190G. 

Cullman & Hickey, Attorneys for Administrator, rooms 667, 668 and 
669, Parrott building. San Francisco. Cal- 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 4, 1905. 



Club Gossip 



There is an interesting question to be decided at 
the next convention of the California Federation of 
Women's Clubs, to be held February 7th, 8th and 9th 
in Los Angeles. At that time,- the women will or 
will not strike the first knell of the passing of the 
club, which lives and has its being for women only. 
For the past three or four years, all over the country, 
there has been a growing conviction that women 
should not flock by themselves any longer, and a 
proposed amendment to the constitution of the Cali- 
fornia Federation seeks to strike out the word "wo- 
man," and make the body the California Federation 
of Clubs. There is a general conviction that this 
amendment will pass, because the women of the 
southern part of the State are foremost in advocating 
the change, and as the convention is to be held in their 
part of the State, they will probably have a good 
working majority to carry anything they want. 

Tli inking women in high places of clubdom affirm 
that the women's club for culture is raising up a bar- 
rier between husbands and wives, and that in the fu- 
ture, unless the men are taken into the clubs, that 
they will not be companionable for the women who 
read and study and discuss everything under the sun. 
In the civic clubs, the claim is made that, as a matter 
of duty, men and women should work together, each 
being equally interested in the well-being of the com- 
munity. The up-to-date club women say that the 
ideal club, and the only rational one, and the one 
which is surely coming is that in which men and 
women will study and work and play together. 
* * * 

Unless all signs fail, the co-operative club-house is 
going to be a fact, but if so, it will be built and han- 
dled in a way quite different from the original plan. 
At first, the real estate men, invited to assist in the 
matter, said that they could get some capitalist to 
put up the $150,000 or more for the site and the build- 
ing, and then he would rent the rooms and halls to 
a score or more clubs for long leases. That plan had 
to go through, because the clubs are not all incor- 
porated, and so are not good risks. The officers 
are responsible during their term of office, but with 
the popular rotation-in-office rule, the owners of the 
club-house would have a hard time putting his finger 
on the responsible one in case the rent was not forth- 
coming. 

The new plan is for the women to form themselves 
into a stock company and build the house. Experts 
say that $200,000 will have to be raised, which, con- 
sidering the number of clubwomen in this city, they 
think quite an easy matter, arid regard the matter 
as good as settled. The stock will be $10 a share, and 
others than clubwomen will have the opportunity of 
purchasing blocks. 

Those who are advocating the new plan think that 
the proposed club-house will be a paying investment. 
Such buildings in other cities have been popular, be- 
cause they have paid such a liberal per cent on the 
income. Within two weeks the matter will come 
again before the Committee of Presidents, when they 
will be able to report back from their respective or- 
ganizations whether or not they will go into the 
scheme. It is quite likely that even if the clubs do 
not, as a whole, go into the building business, that 
the plan will be carried forward by a limited number 
of women and men of large means. 

If you require a dainty piece of lacquer-ware to 
decorate a cozy corner, you will find a rare collection 
at Geo. T. Marsh & Co.'s, 214 Post street. 



BOOTH'S DRY GIN 



FOR 

COCKTAILS, 
FIZZES 

and 
RICKEYS 
Hilbert Mercantile Co. 

Sole Agents for Pacific Coast 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Commands ;he 
highest price In 
London, and Is 
recognized e. s 
the Best Dry 
Gin the world 



THE CALL 



Has the Largest ar)d Best Honne Circulation 

The SHORT STORY SERVICE in the magazine section of the 
Sunday Call is unsurpassed. There are also NUMEROUS 
CHATTY ARTICLES by the best writers on topics of interest 
to everybody. 

The PICTURES given away with the Sunday Call, absolutely 
free of charge, are art gems, and are framed, preserved and 
sold in nearly every art store. All this in addition to a SUPER- 
IOR NEWS SERVICE, both local ana foreign. 

Subscriptions, Daily and Sunday, by carrier, 75 cents per mouth. 

Yearly by mail, $8. Sunday edition, $2.50 per year. The 
Weekly, $1.00 per year. 



"BABJ"' 



EPICURIAN RESTAURANT 

323 LA'RKI/^ STREET 



T5he James H. Babcock Catering Co. 

409 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASERS' GUIDE 



BERGEZ RESTAURANT— Rooms for ladies and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

POODLE DOG RESTAURANT— N. E. Cor. Eddy and Mason 
streets. Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone, Pri- 
vate Kxchange 429. A. B. Blanco, Proprietor. 



NOTARY PUBLIC. 



MARTIN ARONSOHN, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. 

Office, 682 Market street, room S (opposite Palace Hotel), San 

Francisco. Tel. Black 5541. Loans on any security at lowest 

terms; no commissions. 



BOILER MAKERS. 



P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works. 314, 316, 318 Main 
street. Iron work of every description designed and con- 
structed. 

H. ISAAC JONES, M. D. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Office— Starr King Building, 121 Geary street, San Francisco. 
Rooms 303, 304, 305. Hours. 10 a. m. to 1 p. m., 2 to 4 p. m. Sun- 
day by appointment. Telephone. Private Exchange. 216. Resi- 
dence, corner 5th avenue and 16Lh street, Oakland. Tel. East 36. 



OUR STANDARDS 



Sperrys Best Fhmily. 

Drifted Snow. 
Golden Gate Extr*a.. 



February 4. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»7 








REMEMBER. 

Br E. H. S-.thero In Harper*! We.'kly 

The time may come in 1 lint far-fabled land 

Which we are taught Death opens to our view 
When I, with tearful eves, shall vainly sue 

For the dear touch of a familiar hand. 

The I cm >k of eyes that ever understand, 

The kiss from lips whose ki-s and word are true. 
1 ' grant me this — when I shall call to you, 

In loneliness, from that SO distant strand; 

If you should hear me in the hush of eve. 

Breathe something tender for me to the night, 
E'en if your heart has now forgot me quite; 

For I. so far away, must needs believe. 

Then, in my darkness. I shall see a light, 

Your love for me — and I shall cease to grieve. 

THIEVES. 

Randolph Forbes in The Smart Set 

( Hit of the gleaming casket of the years, 

We stole one golden day; 
How could we know that with unnumbered tears 

Stern Time would make us pay? 

Beloved, we have wept since those white hours 

We filched, as lovers may. 
But, oh, the dream, the dream of youth and flowers, 

'lime cannot take awayi 

BY THE EVENING FIRE. 

By E S. Martin in Scribner's 

If mothers by their failings were condemned, 

1 >h, what an orphaned planet this would be! 
That's not its fate. Their loving makes amend 

For all the tale of their deficiency. 
Though tempers by the long day's care are tried, 

And sharp words sometimes fall, and tears ensue; 
Though hasty tongues unseasonably chide, 

And little faults look bigger than is true — 
Comes evening and anew with strength equips 

Love's steady current strenuous to bless. 
Smoothed, then, Care's lines by childish finger-tips ; 

Cured the heart's pangs by childhood's warm 
caress. 
Clasped in the mother's arms, close to her breast, 
Wrapped in her love, the restful child finds rest. 

THE REFLECTION. 

By Edith M. Thomas in Cosmopolitan 
So deep the bank, the drooping boughs so dark, 

That all unknown had yonder stream slipped by, 
But that its ripples held one tremulous spark — , 

The star, the mirrored star, that watched on high ! 

So dark were all my being but for thee ! 

My life to death had crept in one dull dream, 
Had not thy splendor chose to shine in me — 

Thou, both my heaven and its star supreme ! 

LOVE'S TEST. 

By Susie M. Best in Good Housekeeping 
Absence is not love's true test, 

Nor is the flail of adverse fate ; 
The love that's faithfulest and best 

Is that whose ardors ne'er abate 
Thro' all the petty, jarring strife 
Of daily comradeship in life. 



CRAND CLEARANCE SALE OF 

Oriental Rugs 

at 40 per Cent Discount 
on our Sale Prices 



To make an effective clearance sale and realize 
cash, we are giving actual 40 per cent discount on 
every rug. 



MIHRAN'S, 205 Post St. 

The oldest and most reliable rug house. 



THE REASON WHY 



So many San Francisco houses ad- 
vertise in the 



Oakland Tribune 



is because it reaches thousands of fam- 
ilies who depend entirely upon THE 
TRIBUNE for all the news of the 
day. 




TOM 

DILLON 

SCO. 

OPPOSITE 

PALACE HOTEL 

HAT ORDERS 



SANTIAGO ARRILLAGA 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Tuesdays and Fridays at Studio 

308 POST STREET, Byron Mauzy Piano Warerooms 

Wednesdays at Residence 

5734 TELEGRAPH AVE., OAKLAND 



Dr. H. J. STEWART 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 



Pianoforte. Organ, Harmony and Composition 
Special course for singers desiring church ap- 
pointments. 



STUDIO: 1105 BUSH ST. 



PRIVATE BOARDING SCHOOL AND 
KINDERGARTEN, 

No. 2514 Pine St., near Pierce. 
'Phone Steiner 3171. 

DANCING, FRENCH, DELSARTE. 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 

Lessons in Painting, Drawing, Sketching and Illus- 
trating. Life classes, $3.00 per month. 

927 MARKET STREET 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 4, 1905. 





"Crothers is a liar, and he knows it." 

Tims Thomas G. Garrett. 

"I shall expose him and his methods in a manner 
which he will never forget. 

"When I turn my batteries on Crothers and his 
associates, it will be a fight to a finish." 

Gentlemen, with impatience we await the on- 
slaught. "Lay on, Macduff, and (in this case, doubly 
damned) be him who first cries :'Hbld ! Enough !' " 

Crothers said the Post was about to be sold to Abe 
Ruef for $150,000. Garrett replies by calling Crothers 
a liar. There is the issue. Now, we who know the 
town, may agree without wasting time on the accu- 
mulation of evidence with Garrett's first proposition, 
to wit: "Crothers is a liar!" There we have a state- 
ment, firm in its assertion, and general in its appli- 
cation. It may be admitted that the statement was 
made with reference to a particular assertion emanat- 
ing from Crothers, and that the latter may. therefore, 
take exception to the assumption that it was intended 
to be general in its application. But, on the other 
hand, while, prima facie, it may appear that Garrett 
meant to say merely that Crothers lied in this par- 
ticular instance, it is not going too far to assume that 
if Crothers was false in one thing, he is false in every- 
thing. This brings us back to the original assump- 
tion that the assertion: "Crothers is a liar," applies 
to Crothers in all his dealings and relations. For the 
sake of argument, therefore, it may be presumed that 
Garrett intended no limitation as to time, place, cir- 
cumstance, when he said : "Crothers is a liar." It is 
necessary to have this point established before pro- 
ceeding further with an analysis of the counter 
charge of Barrett's. It being deemed settled, then, 
to the satisfaction of all men of unprejudiced minds, 
and without consideration of petty technicalites, 
which go merely to cloud the main issue, thaf'Croth- 
ers is a liar," we may take up the second clause of the 
first charge, to wit: "And he knows it" 
* * * 

We fear the proponents of this allegation will have 
more difficulty in proving it than in proving the first 
assertion. In fact, of some things no proof is neces- 
sary. For instance, courts will take judicial notice — 
that is, will admit without proof — of our system of 
government, of the days of the week, the division of 
the vear into months, and of other things established 
by custom so long maintained that the memory of 
man runneth not to the contrary. So, neighborhood 
custom, and the customs of merchants, have devel- 
oped into laws. Likewise, courts recognize the na- 
ture of animals fierce by nature, and of the condi- 
tion of human beings not able, either, by reason of 
their tender years, or because of the absence of a 
moral sense, to tell right from wrong. If such a one 
were to give testimony, and it should be shown that 
for years he had not been considered worthy of lie- 
lief by his neighbors; that he was considered morally 
irresponsible by those who had had cause to know 
him well, the court would have no hesitation in cast- 
ing aside his statements. This divergence is merely 
to show that in maintaining the assertion that 
"Crothers is a liar," Garrett would have little, if any, 
difficulty. But to prove that Crothers knows it — 
that is to say, that Crothers is mentally capable of 
obtaining and retaining knowledge — that is a more 
serious proposition. Now, "to know," is to be con- 
scious of perceiving truly" ; knowledge is the intel- 



lectual recognition of, or acquaintance with, fact or 
truth : the condition of knowing. 

Here, then, is a problem presented in maintaining 
the assertion : "he (Crothers) knows it"; first, it must 
be shown that Crothers is conscious of perceiving 
truly ; secondly, that he has the power of intellectual 
recognition of the truth when he encounters it. If 
( larrett is able to prove to the satisfaction of a com- 
petent jury that Crothers has an intellect, that he 
uses that intellect for the purpose of acquiring know- 
ledge — which is truth — and that, having knowledge, 
he knows it as such — he will overcome obstacles be- 
fore which a less strenuous man would retire. Again, 
it would be necessary for Garrett to proceed back- 
wards with his order of proof; that is, not to show 
that Crothers knows the truth (for some things are 
outside the realms of possible proof), but to prove 
that he knows he lies. The poet sings that "All the 
world loves a lover" ; to a simular extent, all the world 
knows a liar. But how are we to show that the liar 
knows he lies? Some men there are who, from 
force of association, from moral degeneracy, or from 
long-continued prevarication, know not when they 
lie. The opium smoker thinks he sees the houris of 
Elysium ; the drink-crazed brain of the sufferer from 
delirium tremens conjures up before the terror- 
stricken gaze of the sufferer afrits and hobgoblins: 
scientists tell us that little children are unworthy of 
belief because their imaginations are unrestrained by 
moral conception. Yet the opium-smoker and the 
drunkard and the little child are unaware that their 
fears are creatures of their fancies. They lie, not 
knowing they lie. How, then, can proof be estab- 
lished in a scientific way that when they lied. th°y 
knew they lied? If they know, they know not that 
they know, and, says the philosopher: 

"He who knows, but knows not that he knows, 

He is a fool — beware of him. 
He who knows, and knows that he knows 

He is a wise man. 

The foregoing part of the argument brings us to 
the conclusion, which we reach with a graceful hop, 
skip and jump, that Crothers knows he lies, but he 




PIERCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO., Inc. 

STOR-AGE. MOVING. PACKING and SHIPPING 

V\ AREHOUSE, EDDY ST., near Fillmore 

Separate built rooms for the Storage of Household Furnilurt 

Office : Eddy and Fillmore Sts, 'Phone, West 828. 



February 4. 1905. 

■t that he know 

rum an inherent inabil 
rt of intellectual strabismus. The 1 
in 1! >f the philosopher. I , who has 

iish powders. Bui the law makes i>p 

I he wise men, 
learned in the law, hold thai a man i- responsible noi 
only for knowingly ntti . but also for utter- 

ing with due solemnity a~ a truth thai which he does 
not know t.i be true. Hence, it Follows thai everything 
by Crothcrs i^ either false, because of his occa- 
il glimpses of almost human intelligence, which 
permits him to preceive Ihe truth, and therefore to 
avoid it : or else, he does not know that what he says 
is true. In either case, as Justinian might have said, 
the accused "is in the vocative." There remains now 
to consider only what may happen when Garrett 
turns on Crothers the batteries of the Post, and ex- 
poses the schemes of the Boughton Bulletin. If the 
batteries don't set clogged, they will not have to work 
overtime to hatter down the walls of the opposition. 
"All hail, then," say I. "for this fight to a finish." 

* * * 

Jimmy Britl says that "mutual friends" have in- 
duced him to withdraw his suit for libel against 
Jimmy Coffroth. Such "mutual friends" should be 
suppressed. They have prevented the only real ex- 
position of fake boxing of which we have had prom- 
ise. 

* * * 

Have you heard any one express sorrow over the 
passing of the late Police Commissioner Hutton? 
Precarious is the political existence of a man who 
lives in a glass house. Hutton won some notoriety 
some years ago, as the attorney for the so-called 
Baroness Turkheim, who was a friend of D. M. Del- 
mas. He also gained some passing fame as a lawyer 
for the Sailors' Union. He was hardly the man to 
lead a crusade for either moral or civic reform. 

* * * 

Some Xew York physicians have gone on strike 
hecause the price for autopsies has been reduced from 
$25 to $10 by the county authorities. They should 
join the Hackmen's Union, which refuses to bury the 
dead without the prior payment of blackmail. 

* * * 

Executor White is having a hard time explaining 
his management of the estate of the late Thomas J. 
Clunie. He admits that he keeps no returned checks 
to prove his payments of money of the estate ; he ad- 
mits that for certain rooms in the Clunie Building he 
charges no rent to a friend of his co-executor, and he 
admits that General Clunie "presented" to him a 
fine desk and a lot of office furniture. Before he gets 
through, Mr. White may admit something about that 
trip of General Clunie's to Jeffrey's place in the 
Santa Cruz mountains some years ago, of which I 
have made mention heretofore. It was at Jeffrey's 
that little Jack Clunie was having a vacation ; and 
there General Clunie went. He was very sick at that 
time, and was attended by a man named White. Now, 
White, the executor, has a brother, and Andy Clunie 
complained bitterly in court the other day that he 
was prevented from seeing his brother, the General, 
during his last illness, by the machinations of the 
Whites. Executor White may make more admissions 

before the case is finished. 

* * * 

Dr. Lyman Abbott says that if, from the day of his 
birth, say 6,000 years ago, until the present time, 
Adam had saved $10 a day, he would not now be as 
rich as Cornelius Vanderbilt was when he died. Why, 
of course not. Adam was a farmer. He never saw 
the streets of Cairo. He knew nothing of frenzied 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 
That lack of kno 



in apples, 
•"''I was Forced out of l>u? ,„ u .. 



A sailor in 

w ho attar; 

of manslaughter in tin 
mendation for leniencx 



Honolulu killed a negro prize-fighter 
lim. iv found 1 

third degree, with 

I h. Judge lined til. 



one dollar. That sailor. ||, ,,,) ,| 1;|( | m |„ ( . 

should he brought up here quick, Wc need tl, 

* * » 

Peter C. Hedvall, the mate of the steamer North- 
land, not knowing the difference between the li-l«t - 
at Point Pinos ami Santa Cruz, sent the steamer 

ashore. In suspending Hedvall's license for a 

Supervising Inspector Bermingham says he thinks 
Hedvall should have at least thai time to devote to 
an uninterrupted study of the Pacific Coast Pilol 
Rules. And there are others, Mr. Bermingham. 

* * * 

'Pile young men at Berkeley are again in trouble. 
I hey row propose putting on a clownish burlesque of 
Hamlet at the Macdonough Theatre, the main pur- 
pose of the production being to hold up to public 
ridicule various members of the faculty. Well, wdiat 
more can be expected from Berkeley? No doubt, 
Mr. Wheeler can prove to the satisfaction of the 
mutual admiration society, of which he is the 
front and center, that the performance is a proper one. 
He can also show that the University needs half a 
million dollars from the State, so that it may have 
greater opportunities of showing the public to what 
extent foolishness is rampant at Berkeley. Great is 

the University, and Wheeler is its prophet. 

* * * 

The W. C. T. U. is after the women. It is said our 
women swear too much ; not ox-driving swearing, 
you know, but only genteel cussing, which, though 
in itself innocuous, yet shows degeneracy, and an 
endeavor to use stronger language than is necessary. 
Particular exception is taken to "My Heavens!'' and 
"My Lord!" The W. C. T. U. says such expletives 
are bad in themselves, and worse for those that utter 
then; they have a bad efifect on the young, contami- 
nate others, and aid in the propagation of crime and 
the spread of desolation. I think the W. C. T. U. 
is on the wrong track. The women of the twentieth 
century are just 1900 years ahead of Eve. They 
smoke, chew gum, swim, sail, ride, drive, bowl, golf, 
gamble, bubble, have their own clubs, their own 
papers, their own magazines, their own work, and 
their own separate existence. They may find their 
emancipated condition rather strenuous, and if they 
want to swear a little — why, let 'em. They are 
twenty-one and white, and entitled to full considera- 
tion, without regard to their previous condition of 
servitude. 



When you are looking for the best, first look at the 
reputation of the company that handles it. A. P. 
Hotaling & Co.'s whiskey is the best on the market. 

The best materials for tailor-made shirts are used 
by John W. Carmany, Chronicle building. Shirts to 
order is his specialty. 



Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. 

& Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Cooper 



® 



MRS. SOLLY WALTER 

Consulting House Furnisher and 
Floral Decorator 



1326 POLK ST. 



Tel. Sutter 3241 



30 



BANKING 



Wells Fargo & Co., Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. February 4, 1905. 

_^^_^___ Bfce Minister Of Foreign Affairs 



:$i6,ooo,ooo 



Capital, Surplus and Undivided 
Profits 

Homer S. King, President; F. L. Lipman, Cashier; Frank B. 
King, Assistant Cashier; Jno. E. Miles, Assistant Cashier. 

BRANCHES— New York; Salt Lake. Utah; Portland. Ore. 

Correspondents throughout the world. General banking busi- 
ness transacted. 

The S&n Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco. 
James K. Wilson, President; Wm. Pierce Johnson. Vice-Presi- 
dent; C. K. Mcintosh, Vice-President; F. W. Wolfe, Cashier; 

C. L. Davis. Assistant Cashier. 

Capital, $500,000. Surplus and undivided profits. $180,000 

Directors— William Pierce Johnson, Wm. J. Dutton, Geo. A. 

Pope, C. S. Benedict. George Aimer Newhall, W. H. Talbot, H. 

D. Morton. C. K. Mcintosh, James K. Wilson. 

Agents— New York— Hanover National Bank. Chemical National 
Bank. Boston— National Shawmut Bank. Philadelphia— Drexel 
& C'o. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— Mechan- 
ics' National Bank. Denver— National Bank of Commerce. Kan- 
sas Citv— First National Bank. London— Brown. Shipley & Co. 
Paris— Morgan. Harjes & Co. Johannesburg— Robinson South 
African Banking Co., Ltd. 

The Ca.na.dian Bank of Commerce 

With which is amalgamated the Ban«t of British Columbia. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 
Paid-up Capital, $8.7000. Reserve Fund, $3,500,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $90,000,000. 
HON. GEORGE A. COX, President. 
B E WALKER. General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlln, Cranbrook, 
Fernie. Greenwood, Kamloops. Ladysmith. Nanaimo. Nelson, 
New Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland. Seattle and Skagway (Alaska). 
Also 92 other branches, covering the principal points in 
Manitoba. N.W. Territories and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, the Bank of 
Scotland. Lloyd's Bank, Ltd. The Union of London and Smiths 
Bank. Ltd. 
\GENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 

San Francisco Office 325 California Street. 
A. KAINS. Manager. Bruce Heathcote, Asst. Manager. 

London. Paris and American Bank. Ltd. 

N W COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital. $2,500,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund. $1,100,000. 
Head Office — 40 Threadneedle St, London, E. C. 
AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London. Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank. Limited. No. 10 Wall street. N. Y.: Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits Issued. 

SIG GREENEBAUM. Manager; H. S. GREEN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank. Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— IS Austin Friars, London. E. C. 
Capital Authorized, $6,000,000 Paid-up. tl.50ii.noo 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buvs and sells exchange and bullion. 

'IGN STEINHART. P. N. LILIENTHAL. Managers. 
T. FRIBDLANDER, Cashier. 



Security Savings Bank 



222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS— William Alvord, William Babcock, S. L. Abbot, 
O. D. Baldwin. L. F. Monteagle, Warren D. Clark, E. J. McCut- 
chen, R. H. Pease, J. D. Grant. 

4 1-2 Per Cent Interest PeJd 

Phoenix Savings B. ©. L. Association 

Pays 4 1-2 per cent Interest on ordinary savings accounts. Inter- 
est compounded semi-annually, and 5 per cent on term ac- 
counts of $100 or more, Interest payable semi-annually. 
616 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

Subscribed Capital $8,000,000 

Paid-in Capital 1,250,000 

Guarantee Capital 200,000 

Real estate loans made o- improved property, principal and 
interest payable in monthly installments similar to rent. 
DIRECTORS 

A. A. Watklns, Charles R. Bishop, S. Prentiss Smith, George 
C. Boardman, Charles E. Ladd, Gavin McNabb. Clarence 
Grange, managing director. 



It transpires that but for the 

The Holy Synod influence of the Holy Synod of 

Conspiracy. the Russian State Church, the 

Czar would have received a 
delegation from the nobles and common people, and 
heard a petition for reforms in the conduct of the 
several bureaus. The Holy Synod has always 
frowned upon schemes for the elevation of the people 
to higher levels of liberty and intelligence. It pro- 
tested against the emancipation of the serfs, and has 
never ceased to point out the error of that procla- 
mation. It is autocratic to the last degree, and be' 
lieves the Czar's person is sacred and his judgment 
infallible, except when lie if led astray by listening 
to the tales of woe of his people, and next to its 
function as the keeper of the Keys of Heaven, the 
Synod's chief business is to intrigue against a public 
school system, and stand by the Emperor as against 
the people in all efforts to restrict the exercise of his 
divine authority and to better their own conditions 
of existence. With the Holy Synod, the end justifies 
the means. That the Synod is urging the several bu- 
reaus to deal without mercy with those who are de- 
manding reforms in the conduct of the affairs of the 
Empire, there is no reason to doubt ; nor is there any 
reason to doubt that the Grand Ducal party and the 
Synod are in perfect accord. The one. argues with 
the logic of shotted guns, and the other kindles the 
fires of religious superstition. Together they form 
a mighty conspiracy against human progress in Rus- 
sia, and a vampire upon the aspirations of the people 
for larger fields in which to plant the seed and har- 
vest the golden sheaves of reason, personal liberty 
and individual effort. The Grand Ducal set and the 
Holy Synod of Russia are the embodiment of every- 
thing that is hateful to truth, justice and moral 
worth. 

Rut this combination of political tyranny and 
church villainy has over-reached itself, nor could 
one measure the possible consequences of its bru- 
tality. By its connivance, the British Vice-Consul at 
Warsaw was assaulted some days ago on the ground 
that he represented a nation that Russia hated. That 
act of itself was the equivalent of a deliberately 
planned insult to Great Britain; but that is not all 
the Grand Ducal set and the Holy Synod caused to be 
done in Moscow at the same time. The Chief of 
Police (if that city placarded the streets with a print- 
ed announcement that Great Britain's secret agents 
in Russia were the direct cause of the existing up- 
rising, lawlessness and protests of the people against 
the peace and dignity of the Empire. The signifi- 
cance of these acts will be better understood when 
it is said that the Police Department of Russia con- 
stitutes a separate bureau, and that the several chiefs 
of police are generals of the army, who are known 
to be men of iron wills, small hearts and no con- 
sciences. Thus, the British Vice-Consul at Warsaw 
was, in fact, assaulted by the Government, as was 
the posting of the insult to England in Moscow an 
act of the Government. It has been the belief in 
European diplomatic circles for some lime that Rus- 
sia's only way out of her East Asia difficulties was 
the humiliation of defeat at the hands of Japan, while 
the world looked on and smiled, or to try to embroil 
all the nations in a world-wide war, and on settle- 
ment day merely intrigue to save her prestige and the 
good name of her army. But during the last month 
or so, the political combinations of Europe have 
been materially changed, and very much to Russia's 



February 4. 1905. 

hurt. 1 1 iricnd 

>"'! ml and glove with the Angli 

• defcnscli n and 

iiirn in Si irg, because the) were conducting 

i;il>i>r das 
.ir that tin- Kaiser would not 
dare attempt t<> employ the army in Russia's behalf. 
And the substantially inn- of Italy and 

Spain. The situation is now such that it seems like 
insanity on the part of Russia to iiiMilt any nation, 
especially Great Britain, for the purpose of forcing 
a world-wide war. This, however, is true, and 11 
.n enormous power over her own sub- 
jects; the military is perfectly willing to shoot into 
gatherings of people. Apparently the army is loyal 
to the Czar, and so long as it is. the nation has noth- 
ing to fear from within, though Russia was never 
weaker as a resisting force against attack from with- 
out. But Russia's greatest weakness lies in the ab- 
surd and contradictory role the genius of the Empire 
obliges the Czar to assume, that of the vicar of the 
Lord Christ on earth, and the murderer of good and 
honest people, whose only sin is the asking for better 
opportunity for intellectual growth and more personal 
comforts. 

The startling despatch 
On the Firing Line. from General Kuropatkin 
a few days ago, in which 
he bombastically announced that he had about de- 
molished the left wing of the Japanese army on the 
Hun river, turns out to be something more of a 
misstatement that he was supposed to be capable of. 
The official report shows that his attack not only 
failed of its purpose, but that he was defeated and 
driven back several miles beyond his starting point, 
and that his loss in killed and wounded was more 
than 10,000 of his best troops. However, it is pretty 
generally believed that he was ordered by the Czar 
to advance and engage the enemy in force, and in 
any event, report a great victory for the good effect 
such news might have upon the people by diverting 
their minds from the St. Petersburg massacre. It is 
reported, also, that the recent arrivals of soldiers 
have greatly weakened the esprit de corps of the army 
by reciting the conditions at home and the unrest of 
the people, about which those at the front had been 
kept in ignorance, and that Kuropatkin does not have 
as much confidence in the loyalty and enthusiasm of 
the army as he did a little while ago. On the other 
hand, only good and cheering news reaches the Jap- 
anese camps, and they are correspondingly enthusi- 
astic and anxious to engage the enemy, but a great 
battle when the cold is several degrees below zero is 
hardly to be expected. But however mighty, vigor- 
ous and successful the Japanese have been in Manchu- 
ria and on the high seas, their greatest victory was 
won in St. Petersburg two Sundays ago when the 
Grand Duke Sergeus caused his soldiers to open 
fire upon thousands of unarmed Russians for no of- 
fense other than an effort to present a petition to the 
Emperor praying for conditions that would relieve 
them of unnecessary burdens that have unwisely been 
put upon them by the Bureaucrats and other officers 
of the State. 

Great Britain's diplomacy is 

Britain's Sharp gradually winning Italy and 

Diplomacy. Spain over to the side, should 

sides have to be taken, of the 
Anglo-Saxon. These two nations are inclined to 
seriously consider such an understanding for the 
near future, because France is already in harmony 
with England and the United States concerning com- 
plications growing out of the Russo-Japanese war. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Spain ami Italy see thai their int. 

to have tl : integrit) • •!' < hina . and 

Japan rccogni ■ 

Russia and Germany join in a land grabbii 

and seize the richer pitn ini I 

tl.it events are arraying the nations into 
tt. ns; the one. England, tin- United Stat. 

Italy and Spain, standing for the integrity of ill the 
rati. uis an, I open door tor commerce; and Russia ami 
Germany, the other, standing for territorial expan- 
sion and exclusiveness in commercial advantages, 

especially in Asia. Above all things, the international 
compact that England is trying for would be strong 
enough to command that peace and the spirit of ar- 
bitration prevail. It is hinted that it will be the 
province of this international combine to see to it 
that sometime the kingdom of Greece shall include 
most of the European part of the Turkish empire. 

Japanese art goods, portierres, and draperies of ex- 
clusive design and complete assortment, may be found 
at George T. Marsh & Co.'s, 214 Post street. 

BANKING . 

Sa.r\ Francisco Sa.vings Union 

532 California St., cor. Webb St.. San Francisco. 

E. B. POND. President; W. C. B. DeFREMERY. ROBERT 
WATT. Vice-Presidents; LOVELL WHITE. Cashier; R. M. 
WELCH. Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— E. B. Pond, W. C. B. DeFremery. Henrv F. Allen, 
Wakefield Baker, Jacob Barth, C. O. G. Miller, Fred H. Beaver, 
William A. Magee, Robert Watt. 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co.. or by checks 
of reliable parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsi- 
bility of this savings bank commences only with the actual re- 
ceipt of the money. The signature of the depositor should ac- 
company the first deposit. No charge is made for pass book 
or entrance fee. 

Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday evenings, 6:30 to S. 

Deposits. June 30, 1904 $33,940,132 

Guarantee Capital, Paid-up 1.000.000 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 976,109 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

710 Market St., opposite Third. 

Guarantee Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 565.000 

Deposits, over 9,500,000 

JAMBS D. PHELAN. President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Presi- 
dent; JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President; GEORGE A. STORY, 
Cashier; C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, C. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Moffitt, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent on postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,474,518.82 

Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, December 31, 1904 37.281,377.60 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann; 
Ign. Steinhardt, Emil Rohte, H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herr- 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Continental Building S, Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA. 

301 California St., San Francisco, Cal. .„„„„,„ 

Subscribed Capital ''IS?™ 

Paid-in Capital S 'S2S'22S 

Profit and Reserve Fund • 450.000 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. „„,♦„-,, 

Dr. Washington Dodge. President; William Corbin, Secretary 
and General Manager. 



Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. «»„„„„„« 

Authorized Capital tSk'doo 

P 5!2£8r£S lt S! SS? STE^ ' Adminisira^; " Guard« 
Trustee. Check Accounts solicited Legal depository f°»' ™™g 
In Probate Court proceedings. Interest paid on Trust Deposits 
and Savings. Investments carefully selected. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 4, 1905. 




wm 




Ihe Fireman's Fund, the pride of all Californians, 
and one of the largest nre insurance companies of the 
world, makes another annual statement, that is in 
itself a commendation of its strength and the ability 
of its management, and also of the strong hold it has 
on the confidence of the insurers, not alone of its 
home State, but of the United States. It passed 
through the Baltimore conflagration and others in 
1904, and shows that in spite of retrogression, it made 
decided progress. Its growth is of the steady kind, 
which warrants permanence. This is shown by the 
following comparative table of assets, reinsurance 
reserve and net surplus: 



|an. 1 Assets 

1880 $741,487.72 

1885 1,520,894.77 

1890 ....2,431.717.79 

1895 ....3,240,861.14 

1900 . . . .3,884,381.08 

1904 5,858,820.37 

1905 6,526,439.82 



Re-ins. R's've 
$244,603.64 
407,998.68 
797,618.97 
1 ,222,299.42 
1,316,-823.19 
2,336,242.1 1 
2,875.7iS-34 



Net Surplus 

$153,172.13 
208,331.90 

484.438.25 
846,267.8] 

1,312,720.64 
2,156,118.80 
2,233,911.58 



which shows the record of a great company. Its of- 
ficers are: William J. Button, President; Bernard 
Faymonville, Vice-President; Louis Weinmann, Sec- 
retary; George H. Mendell, Jr., Asst. Secretary; J. 
Lcvison, Second Vice-President and Marine Secre- 
tary; F. W. Lougee, Treasurer; Robert P. Fabj, Gen- 
eral Agent. In all departments in the Fast or West, in 
Europe or in the Islands, the company shows pro- 
gress. Its strength was won through the confidence 
of the insurer, obtained by fair dealing and prompt 
paying, combined with the ability of its management 
and the loyalty of its rank and file, have made it wdiat 

it is — as good as the best. 

# * # 

The Pacific Coast Casualty Company, E. F. Green, 
President, has secured handsome new offices in the 
new Merchants' Exchange Building. It had outgrown 
its old quarters and needed more room. In 1903 the 
company reported a premium income of $102,771. In 
1904, it increased its premium income to $135,712. Its 
investments are of the most select character. Its 
management is energetic, yet conservative, and its 
promptness in settlements has won it confidence from 
client and agent. It is a purely home company, and 
may be said t" be the leading California company of 
its class. 

It confines its business to liability insurance, and 
writes employers . general, workmen's and elevator 

insurance. 

# * * 

At the recent annual meeting of the Underwriters 
Fire Patrol of San Francisco, John Scott Wilson was 
elected President, succeeding Wm. Macdonald. 15. 
Faymonville was elected Vice-President, succeeding 
Mr. Wilson. Rudolph llerold, Jr., was, for the sev- 
enteenth time, re-elected secretary and treasurer. 
The old Hoard of Directors were elected, with the 
exception of Colonel Wm. .Macdonald. in whose 

place Carl A. Henry was elected. 

# * * 

There is a well-defined rumor that the National < f 
Ireland is to reinsure and retire from this country. 
The National of Ireland does not do any business on 
this coast. The reinsuring company mentioned in 
connection with the deal is the National of Hartford. 



The United States Casualty Company, which is 
about entering this State, has secured the services 
of the Honorable R. B. Armstrong, Assistant Secre- 
tary of the United States Treasury, who will become 
President of the Casualty Company in March. The 
present President, Mr. Andrew Freedman, will re- 
tire in his favor, and assume the position of the 
chairmanship of the Board of Directors. 

* * * 

The Calumet Fire, the new Chicago company, is 
to enter California. The Eagle of New York is flying 
this way, and several others are reported as being 
en route. The thirty-seven per cent loss ratio of 
California looks appetizing to those of our Eastern 
brethren, who have, through force of habit, become 
used to a fifty per cent ratio, and there is a general 
desire manifested to come and browse in the pastures 
where the grass grows green all the year round. 

It is not any nor every company that can come 
into this State and maintain the average loss with the 
average income. To do this needs the experience to 
get the income and then to select the business. It 
requires a California trained underwriter to do this. 
The new-comer is handicapped by his lack of know- 
ledge of the conditions, and the only hope of the 
new-comer is to select the best talent available as 
managers, and let them manage. 

The best underwriter in the field cannot manage 
an Eastern company in this field if the Eastern mana- 
ger knows more about the business than the man he 
trusts to manage. There has been example after ex- 
ample on the street of this kind of business, and they 
usually end in retirement. 

* * * 

The Investigator's computation is too modest. The 
coupons are practically valueless, and it will not be 
long ere the Insurance Commissioners of the dif- 
ferent States take up the matter and put a stop to 

it. 

* * * 

The papers engaged in this idea, and the company 
issuing the policy, might hnd a refuge from payment 
in the recent decision of the California courts in the 
case of Blunt vs. the Fidelity and Casualty Insur- 
ance Company, which is to the effect that "an insur- 
ance company may insert in its policy clauses not 
mentioned in the application." 

* # * 

The British offices are going to have the opportu- 
nity to become acquainted with some of California's 
leading fire insurance lights. Mr. Charles D. Haven. 
resilient secretary of the London and Liverpool and 
Globe, has left to visit the home office of his corn- 




Fine 



PLUMBING 



Goods 



Our new Show Rooms are open 
to the public. You are invited to 
call and inspect our display of 

MODERN PLUMBING 
FIXTURES 

unequalled on the Pacific Coast. 
GEORGE H. TAY COMPANY 
49-53 First St. San Francis.- 1 
Send lo Booklet "MODERN BATH ROOKS. ' 



February 4, 1905. 



S/.N FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



J3 



party. Mr. K"lla V. \\ att. . 
the 

pond t" 
intinent. 
Tin- Federal Council of the Unit Fraternal 

jrue, is in the hands of a receiver, upon the rc- 
the Insurance Commissioner of Illino 

Tin urc. now in session at Sacramento, 

up to the present writing lias been -" busy doing 
other things that it has apparently overlooked any- 
thing of serious moment in regard t" insurance. The 
deposit bill is too ridiculous t>> a sensible man to be 
worth explanation, and it will, as it should do, slum- 
ber away in the committee. 

The other fool hill aimed at a restriction of the 
privileges of a lire insurance company to do business 
in its own way and at its own price, bears all the 
evidence of a flagrant and crude cinch hill. it might 
as well lie made to apply to railroads, grocery store-. 
sugar and Standard I >il Trusts. If passed, it will he 
class legislation, and unconstitutional, and the man 
who votes "aye" will register himself down on the 
roll among the no-nothings who know nothing about 
what they are voting for. if the interests of their con- 
stituents be considered. — G. C. France. 



INSURANCE 



Picture Frames. 
An immense variety of mouldings for framing pic- 
tures to order; also ready-made frames in all the new 
shapes and every tint and color of mat hoards and 
binding papers made. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Mar- 
ket street. 



Dr. Decker 



Dentist. 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless teeth 
extracting. 



Clean carpets are a great source of satisfaction. There's 

only one proper way to have them cleaned, and that's by send- 
ing them to Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama 
street. They will come back looking like new, being thoroughly 
cleaned without any Injury to the fabric. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only $7.50 

per ton; half-ton. $4; quarter ton, $2. Full weight guaranteed. In 
economy, cleanliness and heat producing qualities. Briquet' es 
are superior to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th 
and Channel. Phone South 95. 




a good 

for a 

doll ar.ui , h alf 



Centemeri 

109 Grant Ave.BetGeary&PostSts. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of JOHN GIBBOUS, deceased. Dept. 8 No. 31549 
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, M. J. HYNES, Public 
Administrator of the riiv and Co >nty of Ban Francisco, and Admin- 
istrator of the estate nf JOHN OIBKONS. deceased, to the creditors of. 
and all persons h i\ing claims ugainst the said deceased, to exhibit 
them with th.< necessary vouchers, within four mouths after the first 
publication <>f this notice, to ihe said Administrator, at room 668. 
Parrott building. Nos 825 to 855 .Market street, the same being his place 
for the transaction of the business of I he said estate m tne City and 
County of Man Francisco. Slate of California. __„,„ 

M. J. HYNES. 

Adninistrator of the Estate of JOHN GIBBONS, Deceased. 
Dated at San Francisco. January 14. 1905. 

CTJLLINAN Jb HICKEY. Attorneys for Administrator, rooms 567 
668 and 669, Parrott building. Sau Francisco. Cal. 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $5,850,000 

Foniiil, ,1 A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OP PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Pnld-up Capital J3 000 000 

Surplus to Policy-holders 6,022'oie 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 202 Pine St., 8. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 
Capital Paid-up, S3.446.Mfl. Assets, J24.662.o43.3S 

Surplus to Policy-holders, JS.030,431.41. Losses Paid, over 1134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager, 501 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 5,340,136.94 

Surplus to Policyholders.. 2,^14,921.16 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH. Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 216 Sausome Street 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 



British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital ■ 16,700.000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co.. Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

if Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Agt, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 

Cash Capital, $200,000. Cash Assets, $394,164.15 

PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA. 
Head Office, Merchants Exchange Building, San Francisco 
The only local company writing liability insurance exclusively. 
The only company confining its attention to liability insurance. 
Officers— Edmund F. Green. President; John C. Coleman, Vice- 
President; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. xjorel & Co., Treasurers; 
F. P. Deering, Counsel. 

Directors— A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edw. L. Brayton, Jno. C. 
Coleman, F. P. Deering, B. F. Green, I. W. Hellman, Jr., Geo. 
A. Pope. Henry Bosenfeld. A. A. Son. Win. S. Tevis. 

Organized 1853. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Capital $3,000,000 

Gro-s Cash Assets 17.300.000 

Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere in United states. Canada and Mexico. Insurance againsl 
loss by Fire, Lightning. Windstorm or Tornado. Indemnity for Loss 
of Eental Income by Fire or Lightning. 
H. L. BOFF. General Agent. 
GEO. M. MITCHELL, Metropolitan Manager. 
210 8ANSOME STEEET. SAN FEANCISCO. CAL. 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Corner Seat 



One of the prevalent traits of mankind much in 
evidence among all classes of humanity, is the unfail- 
ing endeavor, often unconscious, to procure certain 
seats, whether in car, carriage or any place where 
tired limbs may be temporarily rested. The coveted 
seat is always a corner one, and it is invariably the 
case that the four corners of a car will be occupied, 
even though rows of vacant seats stare one in the 
face. It has been said that the manifestation of this 
instinctive desire is due to the partial survival of 
the old fighting instinct, which, in primeval times, 
caused a man to place his back against a wall, and 
bid defiance to his foes. This seems a logical, if 
curious, reason for the fact that exists to-day, that 
ninety-nine men out of every hundred wUl seek a 
corner, if left to themselves. The people who occupy 
corners have a look of being in a state of defensive 
siege, and often it takes a warlike person to beard 
them in their den. The penchant of couples for cor- 
ners is well known. Perhaps, in their case, it is 
moral support which is needed. The trait has been 
carried into metaphor, as used in phrases of modern 
slang. "A corner in wheat," or "He's in a corner." 
The "survival of the fittest" finds its beginning and 
apotheosis in the "corner man." 
* * * 

Apropos of the above, an amusing incident occurred 
a few days ago. A solitary passenger on one of the 
principal street car lines had his attention attracted 
by a tiny pool of shining oil which had evidently 
dripped from an unlighted lamp above. It was on 
the corner seat, and was not visible to the casual 
glance, so when the second passenger — a woman, 
handsome and well-gowned — entered and seemed 
directly making for the fatal seat, the solitary man, 
not wishing to see such splendid raiment come to 
untimely ruin, and deadly afraid that lie might not 
be in time, suddenly yelled, excitedly: "Don't sit 
there — all oil there." The lady looked startled, 
glanced quickly at the perspiring man, murmured 
sweetly: "Oil? How distressing!" and swept her dra- 
peries into the farther seat. 

The third passenger entered. His fellow travelers 
were human ; so on seeing him about to sit in the spot 
of doom, lost embarrassment in dire expectancy, and 
chorused in unison: "Don't sit there; all oil there!" 
The man, being quick of wit and nimble of move- 
ment, grasped the situation, and elevated his some- 
what portly form just in time to escape the imminent 
catastrophe. All corners, save the "corner in oil," 
were now taken and the car was rapidly filling. As 
each one came in, the chorus was repeated, but when 
all the seats were occupied save "the" one, the last 
comer made a bee line for it. As one man, the pas- 
sengers, hugely enjoying the situation and thankful 
for their own escapes, screamed with a will the famil- 
iar words: "Don't sit there; all oil there!" but the 
man, who had a weary, "glad to get a seat" expres- 
sion, dropped, notwithstanding the chorus of protes- 
tations, directly into the fatal spot. A pained expres- 
sion gradually stole over his features, as he tried to 
grasp the evening news from the paper, and in a few 
minutes he arose and gently examined the back of 
his coat. The pained expression had not subsided 
when he left the car, but the conductor, on his rounds, 
was moved to remark : 

"Chorus didn't seem to work that time?" 
The passengers listened expectantly. The biggest 
man answered : "No ; wonder why !" 

"Ought to have poked him ; he's deaf as a post," 
was the "man of fares" laconic reply. 




February 4, 1905. 

HIGH 

CLASS 
WALL 
PAPERS 

AT ALL PRICES 

Interior 
Decorating 
Ideas and 
Estimates 
Furnished 

L. Tozer & 
Son Co. 

Retail Salesroom 

110 GEARY ST. 

2nd Floor 

Wholesale Department 

762-764 Mission 
Street 



REMOVAL NOTICE 



PATRICK & CO.. have moved to their new 
quarters 111-113 8AN80ME STREET, where a 
complete line of Rubber Stamps, Stencil*. Seals, 
Metal Checks. Box Brands, etc, can be found. 




MISS LOUSE MANNING, Manager 

MRS. CLARICE COHEN, President 



House and Church Wed- 
dings. 

Receptions, Lunch eons, 
Dinners, and Funerals. 

Supply and care of flowers 
for offices. 

Choicest cut flowers. 



246 StocKton St 

Corner PoBt 
TELEPHONE MAIN 847 



MR. 


ALBERT 

ARCHITECT 


FARR 


REMOVE!? 




120 SUTTER ST. 



Phoue Folsom 3102 


Res. Phone Church 2C1C 


R. W. 


NcDANIEL 




Patent Chimney 




CHIMNEY TOPS. 


SMOKEY CHIMNEYS 


CURED 


1719 MARKET STREET, S. F. 





Red Eyes and Eye- 
lids. Gran u 1 a t e d 
Eyelid* and other 
Eye troubles cured 



MURINE EYE REMEDY 



February 4, 1905. 

TARTAR IS A TARTAR 

' spongy. Nnsdltvo r-m* rank 
te/tar accumulation. It should b« lefnortjd 

■ by y - -r denttil a:. J thereafter pr*- 
vmtad by the use of 

SOZODONT 

TOOTH POWDER 

And its complement. SOZODONT Liquid 
The Powder Is slightly abrasive, is abso- 
lutely free from grit and acid, and is Jusi 
the thin? '<" those who have an Inclination 
for the niceties cf every-day life 

3 FORMS: LIQUID. POWDER, PASTE. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



35 



VALUABLE RECIPES FOR 

THE USE OF NON-MEAT 

EATERS. 

THE NO MEAT DIET. 

There is a general cry all over 
the world for a practical daily 
menu for the no-meat dietarians. 
The News Letter will publish, 
from week to week, a set of recipes 
that will cover the needs of the 
people under any and all condi- 
tions without the use of meat. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

FOR 6 PERSONS— 2 ozs. of flour; 2 ozs. 
of cheese (Parmesan or mild Cheddar); 1 
oz. «»f lard; 1 oz. of butter; 1 gill of water; 
pepper and salt. 

Take 2 ozs. of flour; 2 ozs. of cheese; 1 
oz. of lard; 1 oz. of butter; mix into a light 
paste with a little water. Cayenne and 
salt, roll out the paste very thin, cut into 
straws and bake in a quick oven. 




J)OES a considerate host serve 
guesswork drinks to his 
guests? Of course not. 

CLUB COCKTAILS are pre- 
ferred because of their uniformly 
high quality, and readiness at all 
times. They're made from choi- 
cest old liquors, blended in ex- 
quisite proportions and aged to 
perfection. Just strain through 
cracked ice. CLUB is the original 
brand— specify the name to get 
the genuine. 

Seven kinds — Manhattan, Martini, 
Vermouth, Whiskey, Holland Gin, Tom 
Gin and York. 

G. F. HEUBLE1N & BRO., Sole Proprietors 

HARTFORD NEW YORK LONDON 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

8POHN-PATRIGK COMPANY 

Ban Francisco. Los Angeles. 
Denver, Bait Lake City, Seattle. 



- 






PTRAMU m 

* of nui nronl; i 

h. 1 < 

■ 

I Mil I.. | 

•rlth .1 \«>ry 
»m*ll oni,»n .in. I mm palt in Uu 
drain It vail; imiko a thick irhlti 

nd salt 
to lnp(. 

•n It, then one "f muk 
•o on till you h mt; sprinkle 

iml put Into the oven 
i.. brown. 



ftlACARuNI WITH ToMATo S.\l « "K 

FOR .. PBR80NS :-: lb. <>r macaroni; 

l oi. or batter; l onion: 2 i-i on, of grated 
Gruyen L-1 on of grated Par- 

n suspicion of nutmeg; i-l' tea- 
spoonful of papper; s.iit to taate; I tablo- 
spoonfuls of cream. 

Boil half a pound of macaroni in water 
with a I'ini i* «if butter, an nnlon, 2 cloves 
and salt; when dona, drain the macaroni 
and place to a saucepan with 2 1-2 ozs. of 
grated Qruyei and 2 1-2 oas, "f 

grated Parmesan cheese, a little grated 
nutmeg, soma coarse black pepper, 6 
tableapoonfula of en-am or top milk; toss 
and stir well until the cheese becomes 
thick ami stringy. Dish up with tomato 
sauce in the middle of the dish. 

RICE CHEESE 
Is made the same way, only using rice 
instead of macaroni, and the onion may- 
be omitted in both If not liked. 
SCALLOPED SALSIFY. 

FOR 2 PERSONS.^ roots of salsify; 
1-2 lemon or 1 gill of vinegar; 1-2 oz. of 
salt; 1-2 pint of milk; 1 tablespoonful of 
flour; 1 oz. of butter; 1 tablespoonful of 
fried crumbs of bread; 2 scallop shells. 

Scrape some roots of salsify, cut them 
into short lengths and throw them into 
cold water with either lemon juice or vine- 
gar in it; boil them till VERT tender in 
well-salted water; when cooked, drain and 
put into thick white sauce, to which you 
have added a little pepper; put them 
into scallop shell and sprinkle bread- 
crumbs on them. Serve very hot. 



ONIONS AU RIZ. 
Put four onions into a frying-pan with 
butter enough to fry; when getting brown, 
shake in 3 tablespoonfuls of rice (boiled 
and very dry, and each grain separated); 
add pepper, salt, a LITTLE mace, 1 or 2 
cloves, a teaspoonful of sugar, and another 
of vinegar (plain or Tarragon). Shake up 
well and serve very hot. 



POTATOES A LA MAITRE D'HOTEL. 
Slice boiled potatoes and put the slices 
Into a stewpan with a little white sauce, 
2 ozs. of better, chopped parsley, pepper 
and salt, and a spoonful of lemon juice. 
Toss until well mixed and serve. 



CURRIED MACARONI. 
Boil the macaroni until tender, and pour 
the following sauce over it: Slice 6 large 
onions, and stew over a slow fire in 2 ozs. 
of butter; add 2 sliced apples, and stew 
till these are mixed; then add a teaspoon- 
ful of vinegar, 2 ozs. of flour, some salt 
and sugar; moisten with a quart of milk 
or water, or milk and water mixed. Boil 
till it is thick and stir through a tammy. 



CURRIED POTATOES. 
Slice -oiled potatoes hot, and pour the 
same curry sauce over them as above. 



CHEESE SOUFFLES. 
2 ozs. of bread crumbs; 1 oz. of grated 
cheese; 1 oz. of butter; small pinch of bi- 
carbonate of soda; pepper and salt to 
taste; sufficient milk to moisten. Mix all 
the ingredients well together, butter some 
souffle tins, put mixture In, half filling 




The Easy 
Back Action 

of President Rtupendart »Wi'« nn iuijn«tmwtt 
Mint rsspondi la ercry body ftmant. Thin 

bUBlranUMnaationu 1 N-v-.thI any other rroUo 

and nn tfiB Qfl OQ man an ngnlat aaatan, 

PRESIDENT 

Suspenders 

are made only of tin- best Quality new, fresh 

elastic webbing. Their pattern! nn- exr.inshm 
ami their Berrlce absolutely ijimrantwd— the 

greatest HiiapemliT value in t.lie world. Price 
60c. and $1.«>, every Store everywhere or mailed 

postpaid, 

THE C. A. EDGARTON MFG. CO., 
Box 318. Shirley, Mass. 



them. Bake in a quick oven till a light 
brown, and serve at once very hot. 



GRATED CHEESE 
On rounds oi bread fried in butter makes 
a nice dish. 



BREAD SAUCE. 

One cupful of bread-crumbs; one cupful 
of milk; one teaspoonful of butter; one 
small onion ; three peppercorns ; salt to 
taste. 

METHOD.— Boil the milk and bread- 
crumbs and onion together for fifteen min- 
utes, then add the peppercorns and cook 
for another fifteen minutes, or till the 
bread is thoroughly swelled ; If too stiff, 






)^H^*tt 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 

Bear the script name oi Stewart 

Hartshorn on label. 
Wood Rollers. Tin Rollers. 




add a little more milk to make it the 
proper consistency, adding the butter 
about five minutes before taking off the 
fire. Stir constantly the whole time to 
prevent us burning. Remove the onion be- 
fore serving. 



MOCK WHITE FISH. 

Put 1-2 pint of milk on to boil and thicken 

with rather more than 1 oz. of ground 



BETH ES DA 



THE GREAT AMERICAN 
MINERAL WATER ■ "i 



LOUIS GAHEN a SON. 

I WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

418 Sacramento St., San Francijc* 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 4, 1905. 



ATHLETES 

TO KEEP IN GOOD TRIM 
MUST LOOK WELL TO THE 
CONDITION OF THE SKIN. 
TO THIS END THE BATH 
SHOULD BE TAKEN WITH 

HAND 

SAPOLIO 

All Grocers and Druggists 



rice to make a little stiffer than for rice 
mould. Add a lump of butter, salt, a little 
grated onion, a salt-spoonful of mace, and. 
let all cook together for ten minutes, stir- 
ring frequently. Boil 3 potatoes and put 
them through masher, and whilst hot, add 
it to the rice, or it will not set well. Pour 
into dish to stiffen, and when quite cold 
cut into slices, roll in WHITE of eggs and 
white bread-crumbs, fry, and serve with 
parsley sauce. The mixture must be 
STIFF, for frying softens the rice again 
a little. The oil or butter used for frying 
must be BEYOND boiling point, and the 
cutlets will then be quite crisp and free 
from greasy flavor. This dish is appre- 
ciated everywhere, and is specially recom- 
mended. 



MACARONI CUTLETS. 
Boil 1-4 lb. macaroni in water, not mak- 
ing it too tender, add 6 ozs. of bread- 
crumbs, some chopped fried onions, a tea- 
spoonful lemon thyme, a couple of to- 
matoes fried in saucepan after onions, and 
1 WHITE of egg to bind. Mix, roll in (lour, 
shape into cutlets, fry in oil or butter un- 




.V.V.V.V.W. 

15 



*v.v.*r.v.v.v*r.v.v.ir.tr.M.MVir.vv.ir.v.tr.Kini 

? StylJsh5ir 50 
Suits 

Dressy Suits $20 ,; 

Pants $4.50 S 

i My $25.00 Suits are the£ 

best in America. jt 

1 1 P Per Cent Saved by get-g 
JL ting your suit made byS 

JOE POHEIM I 

TIE TAIISS k 

1110-1112 Hurket St $ 
201-203 Montg'y St., S. F.S 




§\ ALL THE YEAR 
' ROUND TOURS 

v $/ Travel by Sea 

Exccllaat Service. Low Rites, Including Berth and Meali 

Los Angeles San Diego Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Tacoma 

Victoria Vancouver Etc. 

And to those desiring longer trips to 
Alaska and Mexico. 

For Information regard I ne sal Unit dates etc., obtain folder 

SAN PRANCICSO TICKET OFFICES 
4 New Montgomery St. (Palaoe Hotel) 
10 Market St. , and Broadway Wharves. 

O. D. DTJNANN, General Passenger Agent 
10 Market Street. San Francisco 



til crisp and brown. Serve with the fol- 
lowing sauce: Melt 1 oz. butter, stir in 1 
dessert-spoonful of flour until free from 
lumps; add a teacupful of milk and stir 
until it boils, color it brown with some 
browning. Finally add 20 to 30 drops of 
Tarragon vinegar. 



BREAD CUTLETS. 
Cut some neat slices of brown or white 
bread half an inch thick. Remove crust 
and cut into large Angers; soak them in a 
mixture composed of milk, a little flour 
and sweet herbs and seasoning, and fry 
crisp either in butter, PREFERRED, or 
oil. 



ENNENS 



BORATED 
TALCUM 



sfe^lLET 



4.tei«Rj 



Bef- 



ft M emn.cn 'i (the original), 



<rFor 
| CHAPPED HANDS, CHAFING, 

f all afflictions of the ?t^ "A link 
higher fn price, perhaps, thin <axirthless 
substitutes, but a reason for It." De- 
llebtful abet shaving. Sold everywhere, or 
mifld on rtcdpt o! 25c. 
OERHARD MENNEN CO.. Newark. N. J. 



MACARONI AND TOMATO PUDDING. 
Boil some macaroni and mix with it 3 
ozs. of grated cheese, 4 peeled and sliced 
tomatoes, and half a tea-cupful of milk. 
Place in a pie-dish, and cover with a thick 



layer of fine bread-crumbs and a few 
knobs of butter; season with pepper and 
salt; bake until nicely browned. A grated 
onion is considered an improvement by 
some people if it is added. 

(To be Continued.) 



-"V rf~*i\. Train* leave and ire rta« 
/v^ktttt^TX to arrive at 

f^ L^^\ ±\ SAN FRANCISCO. 

I \A — y=r — it ' I Fbom Januabt 15, 1905 
VOX. JEEiVC// 
Vi^f/ Fkkrt Depot 

tf**- »P » J>^ (Foot of Market Street > 

LKAVH - MAIN LINE. - ARRiri 

7-ODa Vrtctivlllu, Win tern, Ruinaey 7 50p 

7.00a Renlcla. Elmlraand Sacramento . 7.20P 
7.30a Vallejo. Napa, t/allatoga. Santa 

Koaa, Martinez. Sun Iltinion 6 20p 

7 30a Nlles, Tracy. Latbrop, Stock:on,.,, 7 20p 

8 00a Shasta Express— (Via Davis). 

Williams, Wlllowa, fFruto. Red 

Bluff. Portland, Tacoma, Seattle 7.50p 

8 00a Davis. Woodland, KntghtB Landing. 

Marys vllle. Orovllle 7-SQp 

8-30a Martinez, Antloch. Uyron, Tracy. 
Stockton, Newman. Loa Banoa, 
Mendota. A run ma, Han ford. 
Vlsalia. Portervllle ... 4.20P 

8.30a Port CoBta, Modesto. Merced, 
Fresno, Ooshen Junction, Han- 
ford, Vlsalia, rtak'Tsiield 4.50p 

8 30 a Nlles, San .lose, Llvermore. Stock- 
ton, (tMllton). lone. Sacramento, 
_ Marysvllle. Chlco. Ked muff .... 420p 

8. 30a Oakdale. Chinese. Jamestown. So- 

nora. Tuolumne ami Angels 4-20p 

9.00a A tlnntle Express— Ogden-ind East. 620P 

9.30A Richmond, Martinez nnd Way 

Stations 6 BOP 

10.00a The Overland Limited — Ogden. 
OmntiH, Chicago. Denver, Kansas 

City 620p 

10.00a Vallejo 12.20p 

10.00a Los Angeles Passenger — Port 
Costa. Martinez. Byron, Tracy, 
Liitlirop. Stockton, Merced, 
Kayinond. Fresno, Goshen Junc- 
tion. Hun ford, Lemoore, Vlsalia. 

Bnk"rsfleld, Los Angeles 7-20p 

10.00a Kl Push, Kausas City, St Louis 

b> Chicago ....; 7.20P 

12.00m Hay ward. Nlleeand Way Stations. 3.20p 
iI.OOp Sacramento River Slcainera rll.OOp 

3.30p Ben Ida. Winters, Sacramento, 

Woodland. KnlgUta L I lug, 

Marysvllle and orovllle 10 50a 

3.30P Hay ward. Nlles and Way StallunB.. 7-50P 

3 30p Port CuatH. Marline/. Byron, Tracy, 

Latlimp. btOCkton, M ml e 8 to, 

Merced. Borenda nnd Fresno... 12-20p 

4.00p Marline/.. Nun Itiiinoil, ValleJo.Napa, 

Cnllsloga, Sun tn llosa 9 20a 

4 00p Nlles. Tracy. Stockton 10-20a 

4. 30p Hayward. Nlles. Irvlngton, San t t3.B0A 

Jose. Llvermore | ! I 1.50a 

t OOP The Owl Limited— Newman, Lob 
Banoa, Menduta, Fresno, Tulure, 
Bake rail eld, Loa Angolas 8-BOa 

B.00P Gulden Stale Limited — Kl Paso, 
Kansas CHv. 81. Louis and 

Chicago 8-60A 

16 30p Hayward. Nlles ami sun Jose 7.20a 

6. 00p Hayward. Nlles and San Jose 9.50a 

G.OOp Eastern BsprvBa— tnnatia. Chicago. 
Denver. Kansas City. St. Loula. 
Marilue/,. Stockton. Sacramento. 
Colfax, Reno, Sparku, Muntello, 
O -'■!-■ ii 12.60P 

B.OOp Vallejo. dally, except Sunday... I 7 Rfl _ 

7 OOP Vallejo, Sunday only f '■ou p . 

7.00P l.khinoml. san Palilo, Port Costa, 

Martinez and Way Slatlous 11.20a 

7-OQp Kcuu Puss.-nger— Pun Custa Be- 
ulcia. suisnii, Elmlra. Dixon, 
Davis, Siieramcni... sparks. Tuno- 
pah. do dlli-ld hikI Kccler 7.50a 

8. 06p Oregon & California Express— Sac- 
rainenlo, Marysvllle, Redding, 
PortlaiKl, Pugel Hound ami Kaet. 8. 50a 

8.1 Op Hayward, Nlles ami San Jose (Sun- 
day only i . 11 -50a 



Coast Line 

Narrow Gauge I 

(Foot of Market Street) 

6.16a Newark. Oentervllle. San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Sautu 

Cruz and Way Stations B 65p 

t2.16P Newark, Centervllle. San Joae. 
New Almaden, Los Onto*. Felton, 
Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz and 
Principal Way Stations HO 55a 

4. 16p Newark. San Joae. Loa Gatoe... ■} ^3 55^ 
a9-30P Hunters* Train Saturday only)— 

San J.-se and Way Slut Ions 17 2jp 

COAST LINE (Brmid t.niige). 
g ar (Third and To wi i^ cml Streeta.J 

6 10a San Jose ami Way Stations 63Tp 

7.00a San Jose and Wny Stations 540p 

8.00a New Almaden <Tues., Frld.. only). 4.10p 
8 00 a The Coaster — San Jttse, Sal I hub, 
San Ardo, Paso Rubles, Santa 
Margarita, Ban Luis Obispo, 
Guadalupe. QuvlotO, Santa Bar- 
bara. San Buenaventura.Oxnurd, 

Burlmnk. Loa Angeles 10-30p 

8.00A Gllruy. HoIllBter. Castrovllle, Del 
Monte, Paelllc Grove, Surf, Loin- 

poc 1030p 

9.00a San Jose. Tres Plnos.WatsonvlIle, 
Capltola. Simla Cruz, PaclUc 
Grove, Salinas San l.ui» OMspo 

and l'rln.-l|. 1 Why Slutlou 4.1Dp 

1030a Sau Juse and Way Stalloua 1 20p 

11 iCASau Juse and WBJ SUllOUB 7-iO^ 

2 15p san Jose and Way Stations 8 36* 

3 LLP Del Motile Express— Santa Clara, 
San Jose, WatBODVllI e. Santa 
Cruz. Del Monte. Monterey, 
PaclUc Gr^vc 121 5p 

( 3.00p Los Giuob, Wright. Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, via Santa Clara and 

Narrow Gauge +1 0.45a 

330P Vali-ncla St., BoutD San Franelsco, 
Burllnganic, San Jo.-e, Gllroy, 

Holllster. Ires Pinna 10 45a 

4-30p "an Jose and Way Stations +8 00a 

T6.0QP Santa Clara, &aU Juse. l.os Galoa. 

and principal Wm Sh.ti..ns. .. r9.00A 
■',5.3 Op £mn J usi'imd Principal Way Stations {9.40a 
b 4Bp Sunset Express.— Redwood, San 
Jobc Gllroy, Salinas, Paso Rubles. 
San Luis Obispo. Santa Barbara 
Lob Angeles, Iteming. El Paso. 

New Orleans 9 10a 

B.46p El Pflbu, Kansas City, St. Loula, 

Chicago 10.30P 

6.4BP PaJaru. Watsunvlllc, CnpltolB, 
Santa Cruz. Castrovllle, Del 

Monte, Pacific Gmvc 10-30P 

16-16P * hij Maleo.Berefiford.llelmoni.San 
Carlos. Rethvouil. Fair Oaks 

MenloPark. Palo Alto t6.4SA 

6 30p San Jose and Way Stations 6. 36a 

B.OOp Palo Alto and Way StallunB 10.16a 

11 .30p South San Francisco, M Illume. Bur 
.ingame, San Mateo, Belmont. 
Shu Carlos. Kedwoud, Fair OakB. 

MenloPark nnd I'alu Alto t94BP 

01130^ Mayileld. Mountain View, Sunny- 
vale, Lawrence. Satila Clara and 
S.H1 Jnsp I9.4SP 

OAKLANO HARBOR FERRY 

'Foot of Market St.) 
1 7.16 a.m. 9.00a.m. 11.00 a.m. 
1.00 p. m. 3.00 p.m. 6.16 p.m. 

A for Morning P for Afternoon 

1 Sunday excepted I Sunday only 

,<• Saturday only. t> Monday only 

isti.p s at all stations op Snnim 

Tbl UNHP TltANSi Kit COMPANY 
will call for and check imggugc 1 rom botela and rMl- 
denceB Telephone. i'.xctiangeda 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS w,n 55%l« 

Sohmar Piano Agancy 
308-312 Poit St.^an Fraodtc* 



Received Gold Medal— Highest Award World's Pair, St. Louis, 1904. 



Seen at the Tre^ckside 




? 



.... 


^^^^ * ' 


^^ 






*^Bft ^kt ^4m\ 



Watch this pa.ge for Developments 




ESTABLISHED JULY ao. 1856. Annual Subscription, $4.00 



Price per Copy, 10 cents. 

«*vHl 




Vol. LXX. 



SAN FRAN 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER Is printed and published 
srery Saturday bjr the proprietor, Krederlc. Marriott. Halleck 
Building. 13} Sansome ilreet. San Francisco. Cal. 

Entered at San Francisco Postofflcs aa second class matt.r 

New York Office — twhere Information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising)— £M Broadway, C. C. Murphy, 
Representative. 

London office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C. England. George Street A Co. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than t a. m. 
Thursday previous to day of Issue. 



News about spots on the sun is interesting to every- 
body except the man whose male offspring lias the 

measles. 



Barker Beckwith has gone to a promised land 
where there are no promissory notes and no Mrs. 
Chad wicks. 

In stormy weather, it's the wise female who dons 
her finest hosiery and thus makes sure of having 
her "see legs" on. 

San Francisco would like to be amused over the 
idea of Jack London for Mayor of Oakland, but it 
remembers the fiddler and refrains from mirth. 



Marked money has made marked men of four 
statesmen at Sacramento, and one industrious mem- 
ber of the "third house." 



There are several Hochs now in the public eye and 
ear — Hoch of Nebraska, Hoch the Bluebeard, and 
Hoch der Kaiser. 

Hearst appears to think that Roosevelt ought not 
to ride on a pass. Very many people think Hearst 
ought to ride on a rail. 

It is recalled now that the boodle agent in the Sena- 
torial scandal selected for himself in the early days of 
the session the suggestive pen-name of "Long Green." 

With Sergeants at $250 a week and plain patrolmen 
at $40, no wonder the police force has favored short 
terms and rotation in office for the Chinatown squad. 

The esteemed Examiner is making wry faces over 
the doses of "hot Scotch" it is being compelled to 
swallow in the boodle investigation at the capitol. 

The Czar's health was drunk the other day by a 
deputation of workmen. The Czar's officers in Man- 
churia are said to be drunk a large part of the time. 

Fresno County lovers outwitted a cruel parent by 
eloping down a thirty-mile flume. This is refreshing 
intelligence in a time when so many love aflfairs are 
going up the flume to the divorce court. 

The Lodi Sentinel, ably seconded by the Examiner, 
has failed dismally in its effort to convince California 
that the national Government, intended to pull up the 
Yosemite by the roots and transplant it in the vicinity 
of Oyster Bay. 



:bruary 11, 1905. 



Number 6. 



It must be that many "duck dinners" have made 
the lawmakers at Sacramento so expert in dodging 
issues and inquiries. 



Kentucky now boasts of ;• "tree that talks." The 
young people who have done their love-making in its 
vicinity hope that it will not develop a memory, as 
well as vocal organs. 

A Modesto woman, having been badly injured by 
a demonstrative heifer, that town is looking around 
for a prodigal son, so that it may serve a double 
purpose when it kills the calf. 

While the Legislature is looking into the protec- 
tion of game, it might turn its attention to fan-tan, 
lottery, pie-gow and other Chinatown sports, now 
menaced by an unbribed police force. 

The Police Department declares, as one man, that 
it was foolishness that made Sergeant Ellis confess 
that he took bribe money in Chinatown, and sheer 
insanity to hand over most of it to the Grand Jury. 

One hears often, especially around election times, 
of the lie being cast in a person's teeth, but it remain- 
ed for a lady down in the sunny San Joaquin to cast 
lye in the eye of an urchin who was bedeviling her. 

An Examiner editor volunteers the statement that 
he has never trafficked in the estates of dead people 
in the Morgue. His employer will doubtless want to 
know why he has neglected this branch of industry. 



If the New York Legislature carries out its an- 
nounced intentions, it will soon be a crime in that 
State to tip a waiter, but there will still be money 
and honors for the man who can tip a longshot. 

A San Francisco Assemblyman wants the Legisla- 
ture to adopt green and gold as the State's colors. 
The measure will be smashed in the Senate, where 
the mere mention of money, sound or soundless, pro- 
duces shudders. 



In New York, the law has the gamblers and police 
on the run. The uniform of the police is the only dis- 
tinguishing mark between them. Substitute San 
Francisco for New York — but, then, the law against 
crime is in cold storage here. 

Montana sends Tom Carter to the Senate. But 
Montana should not be reduced to a territory for the 
offense because it would make a precedent which 
might operate to practically abolish the United 
States Senate — or Millionaire's Club. 

The 50,000 Japs that forced Stoessel to surrender 
have joined Oyama, and are ready to make life a bur- 
den to Kuropatkin. In the matter of hand-to-hand 
fighting they are the most experienced soldiers in the 
world, and the fellows enjoy fighting. They like it 
better than football. 



[ SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

UNMASKING OF THE EXAMINER. 
By this time, it must be apparent to anybody who 



February u, 1905. 



reads newspapers that the wily Scot, Gavin McNab, 
has been too much and too many for the hired 
schemers of the Examiner office. No matter